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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2018

    
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/3/2018
Pfc. William F. Cavin U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/2018 Tarawa 5/2/2018
Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/11/1945 Germany 4/27/2018
Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 4/27/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum U.S. Army Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/24/2018
Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/23/2018
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2018
Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte U.S. Army Air Forces 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force 8/1/1943 Romania 4/16/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/13/2018
Pfc. John H. Walker U.S. Arny Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry DIvision 11/24/1944 Germany 4/13/2018
Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/10/2018
Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/9/2018
Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser U.S. Marine Corps Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 4/6/2018
Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan U.S. Army Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 4/3/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews U.S. Army Air Forces 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force 5/29/1943 France 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/26/2018
Capt. George Van Vleet U.S. Army Air Forces 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group 1/21/1944 Tarawa 3/22/2018
Sgt. Donald L. Baker U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/20/2018
Col. Peter J. Stewart U.S. Air Force Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing 3/15/1966 Vietnam 3/19/2018
Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/16/2018
Cpl. James I. Jubb U.S. Army Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/10/1950 South Korea 3/14/2018
Sgt. Julius E. McKinney U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 3/14/2018
Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz U.S. Army Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 9/28/1944 Netherlands 3/14/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2018
1st Lt. William W. Shank U.S. Army Air Forces 338th Fighter Squadron 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force 11/13/1943 Germany 3/6/2018
Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 5/30/1945 Japan 2/28/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 2/20/2018
Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile U.S. Army Comapny E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/20/2018
Pfc. Joe Lukie U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 2/16/2018
Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 2/14/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/13/2018
Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/8/2018
Pfc. David Baker U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/8/2018
Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 2/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Pfc. Jack H. Krieger U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/31/2018
Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/31/2018
Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/26/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon U.S. Army Gompany G, 8th Cavalry Regiment 9/5/1950 South Korea 1/19/2018
Pfc. Lamar E. Newman U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/27/1950 North Korea 1/19/2018
1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford U.S. Army Air Forces 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 12/17/1944 Croatia 1/19/2018
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018
Col. Edgar F. Davis U.S. Air Force 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing 9/17/1968 Laos 12/30/2017
 
List posted 05/06/18

 
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.
 
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- There are nearly 83,000 Americans who are unaccounted for, considered POW's or Missing in Action. Saturday, the ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency personnel will be in Louisville, Kentucky, Saturday to meet with Families of loved ones who are ...
 
 
The military's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA, had identified Hellstern's remains. "I started bawling, just started bawling, because I've ...
 
 
In October 2016, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began exhuming those remains. Scientists used dental records to help identify Grimm's ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Navy personnel spent more than two years recovering remains of those lost on the USS Oklahoma.  05/18/18

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 May, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Louisiana Marine Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full
Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore, accounted for on February 12, will be
buried May 26 in his hometown.

Moore, 25, of Chatham, Louisiana, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in
World War II.

His niece, Barbara Norris, of West Monroe, Louisiana, is avaialble for
interviews at (318) 372-5804.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Moore on file.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

In November 1943, Moore was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine
Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against
stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll
of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several
days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors
were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were
virtually annihilated. Moore died on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22,
1943.
 
Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in
the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted
remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Moore's
remains were not identified.

In May 2015, History Flight, Inc., a nongovernmental organization conducted
excavations on Betio, finding osseous remains through various advanced
investigative techniques.  The remains were sent to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Moore's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA, which matched his
family, dental, and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as
well as circumstantial and material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this
mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 72,918 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II. Moore's name is recorded on the Courts of
the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with the
other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate
he has been accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 May, 2018 08:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin Marine Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full
Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Marine Corps Sgt. Elden W. Grimm, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will be
buried May 26 in Neenah, Wisconsin.

Grimm, 26, of Menasha, Wisconsin, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in
World War II.

His niece, Margaret Kersten, of Neenah, is available for interviews at (920)
385-8551.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Grimm on file.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

In November 1943, Grimm was assigned to Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th
Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff
Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the
Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of
intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were
killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually
annihilated.  Grimm died on Nov. 25, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company of
the American Graves Registration Services (AGRS) had recovered remains from
burial sites across the Tarawa Atoll and interred them in Lone Palm
Cemetery.  The remains that could not be identified were designated as
"Unknowns."

In 1947, the U.S. Army began disinterments to bring the remains to Oahu for
identification at the Central Identification Laboratory.  A set of remains
designated Unknown X-150 were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central
Identification Laboratory in Hawaii for analysis.  When the X-150 could not
be identified, they were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the
Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In October 2016, due to recent advances in forensic technology, DPAA began
the exhumation of unknown remains associated with Tarawa from the Punchbowl
and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Grimm's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,
anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his
records, and circumstantial evidence.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership
in this mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 72,918 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II.  Grimm's name is recorded on the Courts
of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from
WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been
accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 May, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Sailor Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full
Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge, accounted for on Nov. 15, 2017,
will be buried May 26, in Ashland, Kansas.

Aldridge, 20, of Sitka, Kansas, was killed during the attack on the USS
Oklahoma in World War II.

His nephew, Raymond Sumners, of Arvada, Colorado, is available for
interviews at (303) 424-8352.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Aldridge on file.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Aldridge was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Aldridge. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Aldridge.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl
for analysis.

To identify Aldridge's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and
anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership
in this recovery.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 72,918 (approximately 26,000 are
assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.
Aldridge's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing the Punchbowl,
along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed
next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 May, 2018 10:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Airman Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full
Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Clarence E. Allen, accounted for on July 26, 2017,
will be buried May 23 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

Allen, 23, of Venice, California, was killed during World War II.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Allen on file.

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National
Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

In mid-October 1944, Allen was a member of the 395th Fighter Squadron, 368th
Fighter Group, and was the pilot of a P-47 aircraft as the lead element in a
dive-bombing mission near Aachen, Germany.  The squadron engaged enemy
aircraft in dogfights in the vicinity of Dusseldorf, and following the
battle, all aircraft except Allen’s returned to the base.  The squadron
Mission Report indicated that a P-47 was seen crashing in the vicinity of
the battle.  Based on this information, Allen was declared missing in action
on Oct. 12, 1944.

Following the hostilities, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC)
personnel searched for and disinterred the remains of American servicemen.
On March 18, 1948, the AGRC team disinterred remains from the community
cemetery of Myhl.  The remains were deemed unidentifiable and designated
“Unknown X-7214,” and buried in the United States Military Cemetery in
Neuville-en-Condroz (now known as Ardennes American Cemetery) in Nupré,
Belgium.

On March 8, 2003, German researchers located aircraft wreckage that
correlated with Allen’s aircraft, in Myhl.  After a thorough historical and
scientific analysis, it was determined that X-7214 could likely be
identified.  After receiving approval, in 2005, Unknown X-7214 was
disinterred from Ardennes American Cemetery and sent to the DPAA laboratory
for analysis.

To identify Allen’s remains, historians from DPAA established a strong link
between X-7214 and historical documentation of Allen’s loss.  Then,
scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used
mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which strengthened the link to Allen’s
family members, establishing a consistent anthropological profile between
X-7214 and Allen.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their
partnership in this recovery.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 72,918 service members
(approximately 26,000 assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted
for from World War II.  Allen’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the
Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands, an
American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from
WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been
accounted for.  Although interred as an "unknown," Allen’s grave was
meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle
Monuments Commission.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 May, 2018 10:01
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Naval Aviator Killed During World War II Accounted For (DeMoss, H.)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Reserve Ensign Harold P. DeMoss, killed during World War II, was
accounted for on May 9, 2018.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1519935/naval-a
viator-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-demoss-h/

In the early morning hours of June 23, 1945, DeMoss was a member of Fighting
Squadron 100 (VF-100), piloting an F6F-3 Hellcat from Naval Air Station
Barbers Point, Oahu, Territory Hawaii. DeMoss was accompanied by two other
squadron aircraft for a night division tactics training flight. Following
the completion of their flight plan, the pilots circled the island. At
Kahuku Point, the northern tip of Oahu, the pilots encountered a layer of
clouds. DeMoss climbed above the clouds and attempted to descend through
them. His aircraft was not seen reemerging from the clouds and attempts to
contact him via radio were unsuccessful. An immediate search for his
aircraft began.

Interment services are pending; more information will be released 7-10 days
prior to scheduled funeral services.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Rick Downes, Coalition Executive Director <rickdownes05@gmail.com>
Sent: 13 May, 2018 21:05
Subject: Bill Richardson Interview

 

A burst of sunlight was brought to remains recovery and other humanitarian issues by former governor/UN ambassador Bill Richardson three minutes into today's MSNBC interview  Please share the link widely!

 


 

Rick

 

Richard Downes, Executive Director
Coalition of Families of Korean & Cold War POW/MIAs
www.coalitionoffamilies.org

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
...noted McNichol. Chuck Prichard, Dir. Public Affairs Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency who aided in recovering McNichol says he was a leader.
 
 
Howard Jack Keil, who survived being shot down over Austria, imprisonment by Nazis, and a brutal forced march, died May 8 at The Waterford at Levis ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 May, 2018 10:01
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Naval Aviator Killed During World War II Accounted For (DeMoss, H.)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Reserve Ensign Harold P. DeMoss, killed during World War II, was
accounted for on May 9, 2018.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1519935/naval-aviator-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-demoss-h/

In the early morning hours of June 23, 1945, DeMoss was a member of Fighting
Squadron 100 (VF-100), piloting an F6F-3 Hellcat from Naval Air Station
Barbers Point, Oahu, Territory Hawaii. DeMoss was accompanied by two other
squadron aircraft for a night division tactics training flight. Following
the completion of their flight plan, the pilots circled the island. At
Kahuku Point, the northern tip of Oahu, the pilots encountered a layer of
clouds. DeMoss climbed above the clouds and attempted to descend through
them. His aircraft was not seen reemerging from the clouds and attempts to
contact him via radio were unsuccessful. An immediate search for his
aircraft began.

Interment services are pending; more information will be released 7-10 days
prior to scheduled funeral services.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
It was a family effort to assist the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to identify the remains and send them back to Diamond. Though she ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says DNA analysis was used to help identify Gifford's remains last July. His body returned to Minnesota ...
 
Of those, 151 American servicemembers – mostly Marines – remain unaccounted for, said Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency spokesman Lt. Col.
 
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - A Minnesota sailor killed at Pearl Harbor will be buried with full military honors Saturday at Fort Snelling National Cemetery.
 
 
Stash spent 22 months in various POW camps in the jungles of South ... as the Vietnamese government was using the POW/MIA issue as leverage at ...
 
 
... the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and in partnership with East Carolina University Archeology Department to locate and identify aircraft lost ...
 
McNichol's remains, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, were buried along with others in a battlefield cemetery on the island after ...
 
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota sailor killed at Pearl Harbor will be buried with full military honors Saturday at Fort Snelling National Cemetery.
 
Hundreds of those remains were dug up nearly three years ago for analysis. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says DNA analysis was used ...
 
 
(AP) - A Minnesota sailor killed at Pearl Harbor will be buried with full military honors Saturday at Fort Snelling National Cemetery.
 
The city of Ashland in southwest Kansas is preparing to welcome home a native son who died while serving in the Navy more than 76 years ago. Navy Seaman 1st Class Willard Aldridge died aboard the USS Oklahoma during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. He was among 429 sailors who ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 May, 2018 09:46
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Ford, G.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on April 30, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1513625/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-ford-g/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ford was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Ford.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ford's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 May, 2018 09:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For Pennsylvania Marine Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Cpl. John V. McNichol, accounted for on Sept. 25, 2017, will be

buried May 14 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

McNichol, 20, of Altoona, Pennsylvania, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Thomas McNichol, of Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, is available for

interviews at (814) 933-9384.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of McNichol on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, McNichol was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. McNichol died on the second day of the battle, Nov.

21, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but

McNichol's remains were not recovered. On Oct. 7, 1949, a military review

board declared McNichol's remains non-recoverable.

              

In July 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA used

advanced investigative techniques to locate further areas believed to

contain the remains of men buried on Tarawa.  The recovered remains were

sent to the laboratory for analysis.

              

To identify McNichol's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 34,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still accounted

for from World War II. McNichol's name is recorded on the Tablets of the

Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with the

others killed or lost in WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 May, 2018 09:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For California Soldier Missing From The Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Albert E. Quintero, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried

May 14 in Long Beach, California.

 

Quintero, 23, of Los Angeles, was missing from the Korean War.

 

His niece, Alice Arviso, is available for interviews at (562) 507-6848.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Quintero on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Quintero was a member of Battery D, 15th

Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Self-propelled Battalion, 7th

Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers

assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed

east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by

overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces.  American forces withdrew south

while the Chinese continued to attack. By December 6, the U.S. Army

evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining

soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because

Quintero could not be accounted for by his unit after reaching Hagaru-ri, he

was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Quintero's name did not appear on any prisoner of war list and no returning

American prisoners reported him as a prisoner of war. Due to the lack of

evidence of Quintero's survival, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of

Dec. 31, 1953.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned 208 boxes of commingled remains

to the United States, which were determined to contain the remains of at

least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. On Dec. 15, 1993, the

Central Identification Laboratory (CILHI, predecessor to DPAA), received 33

boxes of remains, 13 of which were reportedly recovered from the area of

Tongju-Ri, Pyokdong County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea, however in

2015, scientists determined the remains in one box were recovered from the

area of Singhung-ri.

 

In September 2001, a joint U.S./North Korea recovery team excavated a

location in the vicinity of Sinhung Village, Changjin County, North Korea,

and recovered possible osseous remains.

 

To identify Quintero's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, and circumstantial

evidence.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Quintero's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Courts of the Missing in the National Memorial

Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the other MIAs from the

Korean War.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
In 2003, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command disinterred a single casket that contained the partial remains of about 100 crew members from the USS Oklahoma. Aldridge enlisted in the Navy at Great Bend and during his service earned a Purple Heart, Combat Action Ribbon, American Defense ...
 
J.W. “Joe” Brown's father, Warrant Officer Charles D. Brown of the U.S. Army's 31st Infantry Regiment, was interred in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in the Philippines when he made the bracelet for his toddler son. Smuggled out of the camp by a Catholic priest who delivered it to Brown's family, it has ...
The developments at AFDIL have brought a surge of optimism to families of missing soldiers, said Mark Stephensen, vice chairman of the National League of POW/MIA Families. The organization is part support network and part watchdog, committed to pressuring the military into doing everything in its ...
Scientists and researchers for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency positively identified Slapikas' remains in the fall and the Navy is planning an official burial ceremony later this year in his hometown. “It's unbelievable, but I'm very happy to hear it,” Slapikas' niece, Leona Hotko, 88, said. “He was ...
 
“It was total elation, just pure joy,” said Paul Quinn, Sgt. Quinn's nephew, remembering the moment he told his mother that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) had finally identified the remains of a soldier exhumed on Tarawa as her brother-in-law. “Then after a bit, it's kind of bittersweet.”
 
But last year, the Defense POW/MIA accounting agency used advanced ... “It has a gold star there which is the significance of an MIA,” Gibbus said.
 
He survived the Bataan Death March, only to die from dysentery as a prisoner of war in the Philippines. ... But he's no longer on the list of more than 72,000 service members who haven't been accounted for from that war, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which has a $146 million ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 May, 2018 11:15
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For Sailor Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Clifford G. Goodwin, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017,

will be buried May 12 in his hometown.

 

Goodwin, 24, of Diamond, Missouri, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma during World War II.

 

His niece, Mary Putnam, of Joplin, Missouri, is available for interviews at

(417) 623-8013.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Goodwin on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Goodwin was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Goodwin. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Goodwin.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

¬

To identify Goodwin’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental comparisons and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Goodwin’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 May, 2018 11:11
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For Sailor Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Radioman 2nd Class Quentin J. Gifford, accounted for on July 26, 2017,

will be buried May 12 at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minnesota.

 

Gifford, 22, of Mankato, Minnesota was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His brother, Harold Gifford, of Woodbury, Minnesota, is available for

interviews at (651) 730-8790.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Gifford on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gifford was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Gifford. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Gifford.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Gifford's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence and

laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological

analysis.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Gifford's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

              

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 May, 2018 10:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For Sailor Killed During Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class William G. Payne, accounted for on Aug. 9.

2017, will be buried May 11 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific

in Honolulu.

 

Payne, 41, of Springfield, Missouri, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Payne on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Payne was a medical specialist assigned to the 7th

Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, fighting against repeat Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) attacks in the area surrounding Yudam-ni,

North Korea.  Payne was killed during the fighting on Dec. 1, 1950 and was

reportedly buried in a temporary cemetery at Yudam-ni.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover

American remains that had been north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after

the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North

Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September

and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were

returned. One set of remains, marked "Unknown 409," was recovered from a

temporary cemetery near Yudam-ni.  After attempts at identification proved

inconclusive, the remains were and interred as "Unknown X-13409" at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu.

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-13409 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, X-13409 was

disinterred on May 8, 2017 and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Payne's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis,

including anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well

as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Payne's name is recorded on the Walls of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 May, 2018 09:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Torti, N.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on April 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1512183/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-torti-n/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Torti was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Torti.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Torti's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: FW: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Cavin, W.)
Date: Thu, 3 May 2018 07:37:31 -0400
From: moehog@verizon.net
To: 'Moe Moyer' <moehog@verizon.net>

 

Welcome HOME Private First Class Cavin!

 

Salute to HISTORY FLIGHT and all their efforts to account for our Missing in Action!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 3 May, 2018 07:31
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Cavin, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. William F. Cavin, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on April 23, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1511167/

marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-cavin-w/

 

In November 1943, Cavin was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion. 8th Marine

Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Cavin died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943.

 

DPAA is grateful to the History Flight, Inc., and the Department of Veterans

Affairs for their partnerships in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Cavin's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
PENSACOLA, Fla., May 2, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- The research staff at the WFI Research Group was overjoyed when the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announcement that PFC Herman W. Mulligan USMCR had been identified. PFC Herman W. Mulligan had gone missing while serving with ...
 
DELAVAN - A U.S. Marine Corps Corporal who was killed in battle during World War II is coming home at last, and will be buried in Delavan, according to the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). Cpl. Raymond A. Barker will be buried May 5 in Delavan, according to a DPAA news release.
 
 
In 2003, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command disinterred a single casket that contained the partial remains of about 100 crew members from the USS Oklahoma. Advancements in DNA allowed identification of the remains, and family members were sought out. The remains were matched with ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 May, 2018 12:05
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Recently Accounted For Marine Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Harold V. Thomas, accounted for on Nov. 7, 2017, will be

buried May 7 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Thomas, 21, of Columbus, Ohio, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in

World War II.

 

His nephew, Harry Thomas, of Dacula, Georgia, is available for interviews at

(404) 509-3788.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Thomas on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Thomas was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 2nd

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Thomas died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Thomas'

remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to

the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification

in 1947.  By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in

the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the

Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

On March 27, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-087 from the NMCP, sent

the remains to DPAA for analysis.

              

To identify Thomas' remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis,

including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparisons, as well

as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Thomas' name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 May, 2018 10:02
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Farris, K.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris, killed during World War II, was accounted for

on April 23, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1508089/
soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-farris-k/

 

In November 1944, Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th

Infantry Division. Farris’ unit arrived in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany on

Nov. 9, 1944 and immediately began preparing to advance eastward to the town

of Grosshau. Despite continued progress, the regiment’s Soldiers sustained

heavy losses due to enemy artillery fire. On Nov. 28, 1944, most of the

action took place north of Grosshau. According to records, Farris was

wounded by artillery and left the front line for the battalion aid station

that day. His regiment remained in combat for several more days, reaching

the outskirts of Gey, Germany, before being pulled off the front line. When

officers took an accounting of the surviving Company B soldiers, Farris

could not be found. The last any of the survivors knew was that he had tried

to find an aid station. He was listed missing in action when there was no

update on his whereabouts.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Farris’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands, an American Battle Monuments

Commission site along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an

"unknown" his grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the

American Battle Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 May, 2018 07:34
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured and Killed During the Korean War Accounted For (Fuller, T.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, captured and killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for on April 13, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1507887/
soldier
-captured-and-killed-during-the-korean-war-accounted-for-fuller-t/

 

In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army

attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an

area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. After enduring sustained

enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea. It was

during this withdrawal that Fuller was reported missing, as of Feb. 12,

1951.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Fuller's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are

missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 May, 2018 07:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Sappington, O.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington, killed during World War II, was accounted for

on April 23, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1507882/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-sappington-o/

 

In January 1945, Sappington was a member of 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st

Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division. On Jan 10, the

309th Infantry launched a number of attacks in the Hürtgen Forest of

Germany. His company attempted to capture two hills near the Raffelsbrand

sector of the forest. Enemy gunfire and artillery strikes forced the

Americans to fall back. The following day, reinforcements led the attack on

the hills, also sustaining heavy losses. At some point during the two days

of action, Sappington stepped on a landmine. Though he was mortally wounded,

no Soldiers from his unit could reach him during the vicious fighting to

render aid or confirm his death. He was reported missing in action as of Jan

11. 1945.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Sappington’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the

Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Hombourg, Belgium, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette

will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Although interred as an "unknown" in Sappington's grave was meticulously

cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 April, 2018 13:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From The Korean War Accounted For (Ketchum, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, missing from the Korean War, was

accounted for on April 23, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1506969/
soldier
-missing-from-the-korean-war-accounted-for-ketchum-r/

 

In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th

Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry

Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled

into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the

Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers

of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces

withdrew south. The U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members;

the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy

territory. McKinney was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, after he

was last seen in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ketchum's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The same month, the remains of those who died at Tarawa were disinterred so that DNA samples could be taken by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, a government organization tasked with recovering missing personnel who are listed as Prisoners of War or Missing in Action. Paul had gotten in ...
 
... as Marines landed against strong Japanese resistance on the tiny, coral reef-ringed island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands. Approximately 1,000 Marines and sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded. The Pentagon's POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Quinn's remains ...
 
The Pentagon agency responsible for recovering servicemen held as prisoners of war or those missing in action, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, says Quinn's remains will be transferred at Logan Airport in Boston on May 4. “We never thought we'd be bringing him home. It's pure joy,” Quinn ...
 
This undated photo released by the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. David Quinn, who died Nov. 20, 1943, during the battle of Tarawa in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Quinn's remains have been identified and a burial with full military honors will ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 April, 2018 11:41
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For New Hampshire Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve 1st Sgt. David H. Quinn, accounted for on Nov. 7, 2017,

will be buried May 5 in his hometown.

 

Quinn, 24, of Temple, New Hampshire, was killed during the battle of Tarawa

in World War II.

 

His nephew, Paul C. Quinn, also of Temple, is available for interviews at

(603) 924-6173.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Quinn on file.

 

**Please note, a dignified transfer will take place at Logan, New Hampshire

Airport on May 4, with funeral services held at the Congregational Church of

Temple on May 5.  **

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Quinn was assigned to Company C, 2nd Amphibian Tractor

Battalion (C-2d Amp Tr Bn), 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff

Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the

Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of

intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were

killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually

annihilated.  Quinn died on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance the

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Quinn's

remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to

the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification

in 1947.  By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in

the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu.

 

In October 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-115 from the Punchbowl

and sent the remains to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Quinn's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission. 

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Quinn's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 April, 2018 10:57
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement for Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Cpl. Raymond A. Barker, accounted for on Sept. 27,

2017, will be buried May 5 in Delavan, Wisconsin.

 

Barker, 22, of Evanston, Illinois, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in

World War II.

 

His niece, nephew, Philip Wright, is available for interviews at (423)

237-8034.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Barker on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Barker was assigned to Company C, 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd

Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small

island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to

secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa,

approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were

wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Barker died on the

first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Barker's

remains were not recovered. On Feb. 7, 1949, a military review board

declared Barker's remains non-recoverable.

              

In July 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA used

advanced investigative techniques to locate further areas believed to

contain the remains of men buried on Tarawa.  The recovered remains were

sent to the laboratory for analysis.

              

To identify Barker's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his

records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Barker's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others killed or lost in WWII. A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 April, 2018 10:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Soldier Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Billy R. Ball, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried May

4, in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Ball, 20, of Matthews, Missouri, was killed during World War II.

 

His niece, Carolyn Duncan, of The Villages, Florida, is available for

interviews at (352) 460-7108.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Ball on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 8, 1941, Ball was a member of Headquarters Detachment Philippines

Department, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense

fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9,

1942, and of Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942. 

 

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner;

including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to

Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan

on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Ball was among those reported captured

after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the

Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the

remaining years of the war.

 

According to prisoner records, Ball died on Sept. 28, 1942, and was buried

along with fellow prisoners in the local Cabanatuan camp cemetery. 

 

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel

exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to

a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again

exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them.

Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive

commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of

the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains

were reburied as unknowns in the present-day Manila American Cemetery and

Memorial.

 

In May 2016, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume six

graves associated with Cabanatuan Common Graves 437 and 439.  On May 11,

2017, the remains were sent to DPAA for identification. 

              

To identify Ball's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental

comparisons and anthropological analysis.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war. Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Although interred as an "unknown" in

Manila, Ball's grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by

the American Battle Monuments Commission.  His name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery site along with the other

MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is charged with recovery and identification of America's war dead, has a special project to identify remains from the battle, said Chuck Prichard, the agency's director of public affairs. It has since 2016 identified 106 sets of remains, leaving 444 as of two ...
 
Missouri Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt passed legislation this week to add the Kansas City Liberty Memorial — the nation' official World War I Museum and Memorial — to the list of national memorials that fly the POW/MIA flag honoring American servicemembers who are prisoners of war or ...
 
Management said each resident is only allowed to fly one flag -- and it must be an American flag. Other flags are not allowed. “I felt degraded," Kunkle said. "It's terrible that people like that they don't understand that POW. flags are like the most American flags you can get besides Stars and Stripes."...

 https://www.yahoo.com/news/time-now-enemy-battle-missing-gis-jungles-vietnam-034734547.html 

Time now the enemy in battle to find missing GIs in jungles of Vietnam

 
Jenny VAUGHAN, with Quy Le Bui in Danang

Hanoi (AFP) - When Tycoria Johnson told her family she was going to Vietnam to help recover the remains of an American killed there during the war, her mother was proud -- but anxious.

Seventeen years earlier, Johnson's father died in a helicopter crash on a similar mission to find some of the 1,600 US servicemen and women killed in the Vietnam War whose bodies have still not been located....

 
The funding frustrations are traced back to the defense sequester of 2013, with the Pentagon at one point forced to cut more than a third of its MIA .... It was a trickle-down effect, after the arm of the Pentagon known as the Defense POW / MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) saw its budget cut from 2015 until ...

   

 
At issue is whether exhibits by the Navy, Marine Corps and Army that use the Bible to honor POW/MIA's — prisoners of war and those missing in action — suggest official endorsement of Christianity as a religion. Critics say that would run afoul of the U.S. Constitution and Pentagon regulations barring ...
 
 
Purkapile's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with others missing from that war. A rosette will be placed next to his name, indicating that he's been accounted for, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
 
In recent filings tied to the lawsuit that was filed last May, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) agreed to disinter several graves - including 704 and 822 in the Manila American Cemetery - that are cited in a lawsuit filed by Patterson and six others last May. The graves may hold as many as ...

From the Desk of Mark Sauter, SF Veteran, DMZ Korea, Author, researcher extraordinaire.

 

moe note; Advocates, Activists, Veterans, a few reminders concerning the KOREAN War (not Conflict);

  1. It was a United Nations controlled war
  2. It lasted three years
  3. 58,150 + Killed in Action (almost the same as 10 yrs. plus of Vietnam)
  4. 7,190 Prisoners of War (American) (Ten times the number of Vietnam POWs)
  5. 8,170 + Missing in Action (7,704 still unaccounted for – Five times the number of Vietnam Unaccounted for)
  6. No Peace Treaty – Armistice only since 1953

Similar to WW II, many UN/US Military personnel were left in the hands of the enemy. DoD leadership knew, the Commander-in-Chief knew, but little to no effort was made to retrieve them. US/DoD Files are still classified sixty five years after the fact  - Why?

 

Subject: Unrepatriated US POWs from the Korean War About to Get the Short Stick Again -- Trump/Kim Summit

 

 

It appears the PM of Japan wants the US President to raise the issue of Japanese kidnap victims (as I recall, Japan got President Bush to do this back in the day as well – putting more attention on missing Japanese than missing Americans): https://www.reuters.com/article/us-northkorea-missiles-japan-abductees/japan-pm-to-raise-north-korean-abductions-in-trump-summit-idUSKBN1H607D 

 

A worthy initiative…

 

The US is apparently going to ask for the return of several Americans now known to be detained in North Korea.

 

Critical….

 

And it appears, but to my knowledge not confirmed, that President will raise the issue of repatriating the remains of US POW/MIA in the North (the history, politics and payoffs surrounding which could populate 20 articles).

 

Essential and decades overdue…

 

But there is NO indication President Trump’s advisors are asking him to raise the issue of US POWs known alive at the end of the Korean War but never returned by North Korea and its allies, plus the numerous reports of their survival in North Korea decades after the war – plus declassified information that some American prisoners from the Vietnam War may also have ended up in North Korea. [Then there is also the mysterious case of David Sneddon, an American student who disappeared in China in 2004 and who was then reported a prisoner in North Korea.]

 

In comparison, the South Korean government has acknowledged that many of its soldiers captured around the same time and places, were kept by the North, with hundreds still alive at last report.

 

If there’s ever been a time to update the American people on evidence kept classified from them for all these years about US POWs from the Korean War, it’s now. And even more so if the Trump/Kim talks lead to negotiations for a permanent peace treaty – full accounting for POW/MIAs needs to be on the table (POW/MIA issues delayed signing of the current Armistice Agreement for almost two years during the conflict).

 

www.kpows.com

www.powinvestigativeproject.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
FLANDREAU, S.D. (AP) — The remains of a South Dakota serviceman whose fighter plane was shot down over the Pacific Ocean during World War II will be laid to rest next month. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Navy Reserve Lt. William Punnell of Flandreau will be buried with full ...
 
The remains of a South Dakota serviceman whose fighter plane was shot down over the Pacific Ocean during World War II will be laid to rest next month. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Navy Reserve Lt. William Punnell of Flandreau will be buried with full military honors May 2 in ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 25 April, 2018 10:19
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement for Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Reserve Lt. William Q. Punnell, accounted for on June 23, 2017, will be

buried May 2 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Punnell, 27, of Flandreau, South Dakota, was killed during World War II.

 

His  nephew, Dennis Kelvie, of Caldwell, Idaho, is available for interviews

at (208) 459-7974.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Punnell on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On July 25, 1944, Punnell was the acting commanding officer of the VF-14

Fighter Squadron, departing from the aircraft carrier USS Wasp in his F6F-3

"Hellcat" with several other aircraft on a strafing mission against Japanese

targets on the islands of the Republic of Palau.  The mission was to strafe

the Babelthaup (now Babeldaob) Airbase and the two Arakabesan Seaplane

bases.  Punnell's aircraft encountered intense antiaircraft fire over the

islands of Palau.  His Hellcat was in the lead position when the tail of the

plane was seen taking a direct hit.  He crashed approximately 300 feet from

the northern seaplane base, and his aircraft sank on impact.  The other

pilots on the mission did not witness Punnell bail out from his aircraft.

 

Following multiple unsuccessful attempts to locate Punnell's Hellcat, it was

located by the Project Recover, a nonprofit NGO of volunteers and

professionals who work with DPAA in the Republic of Palau, in March 2014

through use of modern techniques and scuba diving grid surveys.  During a

dive on April 2, 2014, a DPAA forensic anthropologist discovered osseous

remains in the area of the cockpit.  The remains were turned over to the

Palau Historic Preservation Office, and then were received by DPAA and sent

to the laboratory for analysis. 

 

In April 2015, a DPAA Underwater Recovery Team excavated the site and

recovered additional remains and material evidence. 

 

In March 2016, a subsequent excavation was completed by SEARCH, an

archaeological contracting firm, where additional remains and material

evidence were recovered. 

 

To identify Punnell's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), dental and

anthropological analysis, and historical evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Project Recover and SEARCH for their assistance in this

recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Punnell's name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery in the Philippines, along

with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 25 April, 2018 10:02
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Pepe, S.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1502690/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-pepe-s/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pepe was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Pepe.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Pepe's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The directive orders city departments to stop enforcing Jacksonville's sign ordinance as it relates to flying official flags for the United States, the state of Florida, or the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, as well as POW-MIA flags. The suspension of enforcement related to the ...
Technological advancements over the years have made possible the identification of unknown remains previously deemed unidentifiable, as has the work of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which provides the fullest possible accounting of missing American personnel to their families and the ...
LANCASTER, Wis. (AP) - The remains of a Wisconsin serviceman killed in the Korean War and recently accounted for will be buried this week. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Army Cpl. Leonard Purkapile of Potosi are being returned to his family for burial with full military ...
 
The Military Religious Freedom Foundation, (MRFF), a radical group claiming to be protectors of the constitutional rights of those in the military, filed a seven-page complaint about a Bible and “One Nation Under God” placard on a POW/MIA table at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Okinawa, Japan.
 
The United States Navy has rejected a leading secularist group's demands that it remove a Bible on display at a "Missing Man" table honoring prisoners of war and those missing in action at a Naval hospital in Japan. Earlier this month, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation and 26 families in ...
 
She asked if I could reach out to the other family," said Farfan. And after several years, the sailor has finally been accounted for by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Funeral services are currently being planned with the family. But Farfan believes that it's necessary to share this story with others.

Click here for Memorial Dedication...

 
The same policy applies to Medal of Honor recipients, Yates said. Yates said she feels bad that some families ... Kanda Fletcher lamented that officers who never stood on the firing line could get full honors at Arlington, but enlisted former POWs could not. “Shame on you,” she said, directing her anger to ...
 
As we learned a couple of weeks ago, the U.S. Naval Hospital in Okinawa, Japan now has a “Missing Man” table dedicated to prisoners of war or those missing in action. That's perfectly fine, but this particular table included a Bible, suggesting that POW/MIAs were only Christian and that atheists and ...
 
“As one of nine symbolic references on the table, the purpose of the book and accompanying description is not to promote religion, but to commemorate the strength and resolve required of POW and MIA personnel in the most difficult of times,” wrote Rear Admiral P.D. Pearigen of Navy Medicine West in ..
 
Army Sgt. Kristen Duus, spokeswoman for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, said its researchers travel the world to try and ID the remains of American service members from World War II. "It can be difficult, we try to rely on witness reports and we have phenomenal historians and analysts," she ...
 
Now his remains have been identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. They were part of a large set of remains turned over to the United States by ... The prisoners were marched north to the Suan POW Camp Complex. In August 1953, his parents were officially informed that he had died ...
 
A year later, a similar script appeared on the website of the National League of POW/MIA Families, he said. The Air Force adopted the Bible as part of the display in 2001, took it out six years later and then put it back in 2012, according to Weinstein. He said Air Force now makes the “one nation under ...
 
John Dennis Wheeler was a sailor aboard the USS Oklahoma that was sunk in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. His remains have only recently been identified and he will finally be buried next to his mother, father and brother in the Gaither Cemetery. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 20 April, 2018 11:09
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Arkansas Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class John D. Wheeler, accounted for on Aug. 14, 2017, will

be buried April 28 in Harrison, Arkansas.

 

Wheeler, 26, of Gaither, Arkansas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, James Wheeler, is available for interviews at (316) 522-1904.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Wheeler on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wheeler was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Wheeler. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Wheeler.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Wheeler's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial

evidence.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Wheeler's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

              

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 08:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Drumheiser, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser, killed during World War II, has

now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1497088/
marine-
killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-drumheiser-c/

 

In November 1943, Drumheiser was assigned to Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Drumheiser died on the third day of the battle, Nov.

22, 1943.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Drumheiser's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 08:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Kelley, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1497096/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-kelley-j/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kelley was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Kelley.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Kelley's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 08:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For (Walker, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. John H. Walker, missing from World War II, has now been accounted

for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1497103/
soldier
-missing-from-world-war-ii-accounted-for-walker-j/

 

On Nov. 24, 1944, Walker was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th

Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in

action after his unit engaged in fierce fighting on Hill 207 near Schönthal,

Germany in the Hürtgen Forest. With no evidence that Walker had been

captured or survived combat, his status was changed to deceased on Nov. 25,

1945.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Kueppers and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership with this disinterment and recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Walker’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in Margraten,

along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in

Neuville American Cemetery, Walker’s grave was meticulously cared for over

the past 70 years by the ABMC.A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 08:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Politte, V.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, killed during World War II,

has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1497109/a
irman-
killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-politte-v/

 

In the summer of 1943, Politte served as a gunner with the 345th Bombardment

Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. He was

killed while participating in a raid on the Ploesti Oil Refinery complex

north of Bucharest, Romania, during Operation Tidal Wave. The goal of the

operation was to destroy the refineries in the area in order to hamper the

German war effort. During the raid, Politte's B-24 Liberator aircraft was

hit by machine gun fire and crashed. Following the war, his remains could

not be identified.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

assistance in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Politte's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence

American Cemetery Impruenta, Italy, an American Battle Monuments Commission

site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown

in Neuville American Cemetery, Politte's grave was meticulously cared for

over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 11:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Wisconsin Soldier Killed During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile, accounted for on February 12, will be buried

April 26 in Lancaster, Wisconsin.

 

Purkapile, 26, of Potosi, Wisconsin, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His daughter, Delores Hall, of Lancaster, is available for interviews at

(608) 723-7288.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Purkapile on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Purkapile was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion,

35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Unsan, while withdrawing southeast to Yongbyon, North Korea.  Following the

battle, Purkapile could not be accounted for and he was reported as missing

in action on Nov. 28, 1950.  By the end of the war, his status was changed

to deceased and his remains deemed non-recoverable.

 

On November 30, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes

containing remains believed to be U.S. servicemen killed during the Korean

War.  The remains in one box were reportedly recovered in the vicinity of

Okchang-ri, Nyongbyon County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea, which was

less than three kilometers from where Purkapile was last seen. 

 

To identify Purkapile's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial

evidence.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Purkapile's name is recorded on the

Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Prichard, Charles L CIV DPAA OC (US) <charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 April, 2018 17:40
To: Prichard, Charles L CIV DPAA OC (US) <charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil>
Subject: DPAA News Article: U.S. Army Spc. Brings Great-Grandfather Home

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Master Sgt. Finley J. Davis, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, was buried today (April 19, 2018) in North Charleston, South Carolina.  Davis, 39, of Pittsburgh, was captured during the Korean War.

Master Sgt. Davis' return to his family was made even more special because his great-grandson, a U.S. Army Soldier stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, received the remains and escorted them home.

Please see attached and pasted below a DPAA News Article about Spc. Zachary Boney's journey to Hawaii to accompany his great-grandfather to a final honor.

To see and download photos that accompany this article, follow this link to the DPAA website:

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1498841/us-army-spc-brings-great-grandfather-home/

For background also attached is a copy of a previously issued DPAA News Release about Master Sgt. Davis and a file photo of him.

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

 

or

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

////////////////

 

U.S. Army Spc. brings great-grandfather home

April 19, 2018

By U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Mikaley Kline

 

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, HI – He finally returned home from a deployment and wasn’t anticipating being sent anywhere else since he had just gotten back. He called his family, told them to pack because they were moving to settle down permanently someplace else. Then, he received a call informing him he was getting deployed to Korea. He would soon be listed as missing in action and never return home to his family.

            U.S. Army Master Sgt. Finley James Davis was returned to his family following a Chain of Custody ceremony at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 16, 2018. Davis’ great-grandson, U.S. Army Spc. Zachary Boney, traveled to DPAA to receive the remains of his great-grandfather and escort him home to his final resting place.

            “I feel, after going through the tour today and watching the agency video, a great deal of respect for the people who work at DPAA,” said Boney. “Now knowing the process you all have to go through, it’s very comforting to know you all put your time and patience into making sure other families have comfort for whenever you are able to make an identification.”

Davis was listed as missing in action in late 1950. He served in Delta Company, 2nd Engineer Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division when he was captured and became a prisoner of war in Kunu-ri, Camp 5, North Korea. It was a truly special and emotional moment for Boney, who felt honored that his grandmother chose him to escort Davis home, he said. Boney understood just how much this would mean to his family.

            “He was very important to my grandmother because she was only 12 years old when he went missing,” said Boney. “My grandma would always talk about how much she missed him, and I know just how important this is for her. She is 78 years old and it warms her heart knowing that he’ll be coming home before she passes.”

            Even though Boney’s great-grandmother is not around today he understands just how monumental this moment would have been for her as well.

            “I first found out about all of this in early September after my mother had called me,” recalled Boney. “It was after talking to my mom and grandmother that we felt that this was a bit of an unique love story. My great-grandmother never remarried after him because she told my grandmother how he was the only man she wanted to be with and didn’t ever want to be with anyone else.”

Even though it took decades for Davis to return home, Boney had some encouraging words to offer those who are currently have loved ones missing.

“Just don’t lose hope,” said Boney. “It’s a long process, but eventually you will find the individual you’re looking for.”

Boney and his family finally have closure after many years of uncertainty. Most importantly, after 66 years of being separated, his great-grandparents finally get to be together again.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 18 April, 2018 13:48
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Soldier Captured During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Milton M. Beed, accounted for on Dec. 4, 2017, will be

buried April 25 in Norfolk, Nebraska.

 

Beed, 30, of Meadow Grove, Nebraska, was captured during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Suanne Jensen, is available for interviews at (462) 658-2635.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Beed on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In February 1951, Beed was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 38th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army

attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the

village of Hoengsong, an area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea.

After enduring sustained enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to

Wonju, South Korea.  It was during this withdrawal that Beed was reported

missing, as of Feb. 12, 1951.

 

In December 1951, Beed's name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and

Korean People's Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their

custody.  One returning American prisoner of war reported that Beed had died

while a prisoner at the Suan Prisoner of War Camp Complex in North Korea.

Based off of this information, the Army declared him deceased as of Oct. 31,

1951.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the

remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. On May

28, 1992, North Korea turned over 15 boxes of remains believed to be

unaccounted-for Americans from the war. 

 

To identify Beed's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis, dental and anthropological and chest radiograph comparison

analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Beed's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 18 April, 2018 13:42
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Airman Killed During Vietnam War

 

CORRECTION: Please note the correction in the first paragraph of the

attached News Release. 

 

/////

 

Dear Editor,

 

Air Force Reserve 1st Lt. David T. Dinan, III, accounted for on Aug. 7,

2017, will be buried April 25 in Arlington National Cemetery, near

Washington, D.C.

 

Dinan, 25, of Nutley, New Jersey, was killed during the Vietnam War.

 

His brother, Charles Dinan, of McMurray, Pennsylvania, is available for

interviews at (724) 941-2875.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Dinan on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On March 17, 1969, Dinan was a member of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron,

288th Tactical Fighter Wing, 7th Air Force, and was the pilot of the number

two aircraft in a flight of two F-105s on a strike mission over northern

Laos.  During the second strafing pass over the target, Dinan transmitted a

distress message.  The Forward Air Controller then observed Dinan's

parachute enter the jungle, as well as an aircraft crash.  Search and rescue

aircraft conducted an aerial search and located a parachute and confirmed

the death of the pilot, however, due to enemy fire in the area and the

hazardous location, his body could not be recovered.  The U.S. Air Force

subsequently reported Dinan as killed in action.

 

In March 2014, a joint U.S./Lao People's Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team

investigated a site near Ban Khap, Xiangkoang Province, associated with

Dinan's loss, recovering personal effects associated with Dinan. 

 

In June 2016, a joint U.S./L.P.D.R. team excavated the same site near Ban

Khap, recovering osseous remains and material evidence.  The remains were

sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Dinan's remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner

System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), as well as dental and anthropological

analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

The support from the government of Laos was vital to the success of this

recovery.

 

Today there are 1,598 American servicemen and civilians that are still

unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.  Dinan's name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with

the others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 18 April, 2018 12:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Soldier Captured During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pvt. Raymond Sinowitz, accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will be buried

April 23 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Sinowitz, 25, of Bronx, New York, was captured during World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Sinowitz on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 8, 1941, Sinowitz was a member of 454th Ordnance Company, 27th

Bombardment Group, the Far East Air Force, when Japanese forces invaded the

Philippine Islands. Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the

Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of the Corregidor Island on May 6,

1942. 

 

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner;

including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to

Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan

on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Sinowitz was among those reported

captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to

the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during

the remaining years of the war.

 

According to prisoner records, Sinowitz died on Sept. 26, 1942, and was

buried along with fellow prisoners in the local Cabanatuan camp cemetery. 

 

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel

exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to

a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again

exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them.

Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive

commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of

the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains

were reburied as unknowns in the present-day Manila American Cemetery and

Memorial.

 

In May 2016, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume six

graves associated with the Cabanatuan Common Grave 439.  On May 11, 2017,

the remains were sent to DPAA for identification. 

              

To identify Sinowitz' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis,  as well as

circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental

comparisons and anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war. Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Sinowitz' name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, an ABMC site along with the

other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an "unknown" in Manilla American

Cemetery, Sinowitz' grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years

by the American Battle Monuments Commission.  A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 18 April, 2018 12:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Airman Killed During Vietnam War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Air Force Reserve 1st Lt. David T. Dinan, III, accounted for on Aug. 7,

2017, will be buried April 25 in Arlington National Cemetery, near

Washington, D.C.

 

Dinan, 25, of Nutley, New Jersey, was killed during the Vietnam War.

 

His brother, Charles Dinan, of McMurray, Pennsylvania, is available for

interviews at (724) 941-2875.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Dinan on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On March 17, 1969, Dinan was a member of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron,

288th Tactical Fighter Wing, 7th Air Force, and was the pilot of the number

two aircraft in a flight of two F-105s on a strike mission over northern

Laos.  During the second strafing pass over the target, Dinan transmitted a

distress message.  The Forward Air Controller then observed Dinan's

parachute enter the jungle, as well as an aircraft crash.  Search and rescue

aircraft conducted an aerial search and located a parachute and confirmed

the death of the pilot, however, due to enemy fire in the area and the

hazardous location, his body could not be recovered.  The U.S. Air Force

subsequently reported Dinan as killed in action.

 

In March 2014, a joint U.S./Lao People's Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team

investigated a site near Ban Khap, Xiangkoang Province, associated with

Dinan's loss, recovering personal effects associated with Dinan. 

 

In June 2016, a joint U.S./L.P.D.R. team excavated the same site near Ban

Khap, recovering osseous remains and material evidence.  The remains were

sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Dinan's remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner

System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), as well as dental and anthropological

analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

The support from the government of Laos was vital to the success of this

recovery.

 

Today there are 1,598 American servicemen and civilians that are still

unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.  Dinan's name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with

the others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
U.S. Army Master Sgt. Finley James Davis was returned to his family following a Chain of Custody ceremony at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 16th. His great-grandson, U.S. Army Spc. Zachary Boney, stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, ...
 

Subject: Herman Mulligan

 

Lost in Battle, Found by Amateur Sleuths: An ‘Unknown’ Marine

Digitized records and DNA tests are allowing civilian volunteers to pitch in and
help put correct names on unidentified remains in American military cemeteries.

http://www.newser.com/story/258011/japan-reveals-names-of-reviled-wwii-army-unit.html?utm_source=share&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=def
 
 
They Experimented on Live POWs. Now, Names Released
Members of Japan's Unit 731 conducted germ warfare experiments during WWII
By John Johnson,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 17, 2018 7:47 AM CDT
 
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Funeral services are this weekend for a Louisiana soldier captured during the Korean War, whose remains were recovered last year. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 19-year-old Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, of Ferriday, will be buried in Downsville ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, of Ferriday, will be buried in Downsville after graveside services Saturday at Ruggs Bluff Cemetery. He was 19. Walker was a member of Battery B, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry ...
 
Funeral services are scheduled this weekend for a Louisiana soldier declared missing in action during the Korean War whose remains were recovered last year. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, of Ferriday, will be buried in Downsville after graveside ...
 
 
Funeral services are this weekend for a Louisiana soldier captured during the Korean War, whose remains were recovered last year. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 19-year-old Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, of Ferriday, will be buried in Downsville following graveside services ...
 
Nania said the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency made the identification without DNA, using new technology. "Basically, what happened is everybody that joined the military for the Korean War had chest X-rays to see if they had tuberculosis. Well, now with technology, they use the collarbone.
 

Since the Vietnam War, the military has maintained the sacred tradition of setting a separate table in its dining facilities to honor POW/MIAs. The table is decorated with several items, each carrying symbolic meaning used to help remember those who were captured or declared missing. Traditionally, as a ...

 
On April 26, representatives of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency are set to come to Severna Park for a visit with Betty Tucker. Betty is Jubb's niece and his closest living relative. She doesn't remember much about her uncle. She was 2 when he was listed as missing in action. “I grew up listening ...
 
It would take almost 52 years before the Hestle family got some form of closure when in June 2017, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency notified the family that human remains that had been recovered by a farmer in an area near where Hestle's plane went down, had been positively identified as ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 13 April, 2018 12:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Louisiana Soldier Captured During the Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will

be buried April 18 in Downsville, Louisiana.

 

Walker, 19, of Ferriday, Louisiana, was captured during the Korean War.

 

His brother, Roy Walker, of West Monroe, Louisiana, is available for

interviews at (318) 791-6596.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Walker on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

 

or

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Sept. 3, 1950, Walker was a member of Battery B, 82nd Anti-Aircraft

Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was

declared missing in action in the vicinity of Changnyeong, South Korea,

while attached to Task Force Haynes.  Based on a lack of information

concerning his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased and his remains

non-recoverable.

 

Despite the efforts of the Army Graves Registration Services (AGRS) and

Central Identification Unit (CIU) in Kokura, Japan, more than 800 sets of

unidentified remains were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, as "Unknowns," including one

set of remains designated "Unknown X-2026."

 

During the initial recovery of X-2026, the AGRS interviewed several local

villagers who stated that in mid-September 1950, two U.S. prisoners were

brought to their village.  The prisoners reported to the villagers that they

had been captured at the Naktong River near Changnyung.  The witnesses

recounted that the prisoners were killed by enemy forces, then buried by

locals several days later.

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis of information

associated with X-2026, it was determined that the remains could likely be

identified.  After receipt of approval, the remains were disinterred from

the Punchbowl on Aug. 13, 2017, and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Walker's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his

records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Walker's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from

the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 13 April, 2018 07:59
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Pennsylvania Soldier Captured During the Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Master Sgt. Finley J. Davis, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, will be

buried April 19 in North Charleston, South Carolina.

 

Davis, 39, of Pittsburgh, was captured during the Korean War.

 

His daughter, Roseann V. Stonestreet, of Henderson, Nevada, is available for

interviews at (843) 670-0716.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Davis on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

 

or

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late 1950, Davis was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent

Chinese attacks in the Ch'ongch'on River area in northwest North Korea.  The

battle began on Nov. 25, 1950, when the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces

(CPVF) initiated an offensive along the 8th Army front. All 8th Army units

were ordered to withdraw on November 29.  Davis' battalion was assigned to

provide security for the division.  The unit was attacked again by the CPVF

and Davis was reported missing in action as of Dec. 1, 1950. 

 

Several repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Davis died Camp

5.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover

American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after

the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North

Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September

and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were

returned. However, Davis' remains were not included and he was declared

non-recoverable.  A set of remains marked as X-14024 were processed for

identification, but an association could not be made and they were returned

to the United States for burial.

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, DPAA requested the

exhumation of 22 unresolved individuals, including Davis.  Unknown X-14024

was disinterred from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu, known as the Punchbowl, on June 17, 2014 and sent to the

laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Davis' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Davis' name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said a set of remains that had been marked X-14024 were processed for identification in 1954 but an association could not be made and they were returned to the United States for burial. The remains of these "Unknowns" would be sent to Honolulu for burial ...
 
U.S. Navy sailors are being labeled as part of an “extremist” Christian sect for including a Bible and a placard about the sustaining faith it represents on a Prisoner of War/Missing in Action display at a naval hospital in Okinawa, Japan. The Military Religious Freedom Foundation, founded by former Air ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 April, 2018 09:11
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Farfan, I.)

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan, killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 27.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1490186/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-farfan-i/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Farfan was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Farfan.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Farfan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
“We would like to thank the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the other organizations that played a part in Felton's case over the last 50 years,” said Col. Alan Davis, son of Col. Felton Davis. “The journey to bring our father home was long, and with gaps, but their work spans years and we would ...
 
 
The Bible is actually included in traditional POW/MIA tables set in honor of captured and missing soldiers at military balls, chow halls and veterans associations, according to Navy Live, the official blog of the U.S. Navy. “The Bible represents faith in a higher power and the pledge to our country, founded ...
 
JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii – Chaplains from the 25th Infantry Division visited Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on March 29, in an effort to better understand the process of bringing lost American service members back home. The DPAA's ...

From the desk of Patrick Hughes, USMC, Vietnam Combat Veteran, POW/MIA Advocate.

 

moe note: Patrick has a SPECIAL connection to the recovery efforts on Tarawa being conducted by HISTORY FLIGHT,  - http://historyflight.com/nw/ - an NGO under contract with DPAA,;

  1. Patrick is also a Marine – and you know what they say “once a Marine….”
  2. Patrick had the Honor & privilege to spend several months on Tarawa as a recovery team member documenting with his Camera the actual day-to-day operations of a recovery team
  3. Patrick has been an Activist as well as an Advocate for several decades, from embassy protest to Capitol Demonstrations as well as an exorbitant amount of Legislative work, on and off the Hill.

 

For those who are not aware, Tarawa had several hundred KIAs buried there after the early battles in 1942 -43. In recent years leadership at what is now DPAA had told History Flight not to not waste time or money bothering with recovery efforts there, it would not be successful. It’s a good thing History Flight’s  founder and Director, Mark Noah, is as bull-headed as he is committed to the accounting mission of our Missing in Action, for his teams have recovered close to if not more than 200 US Marines over the last 2-3 years. They are by FAR the most active recovery unit in this mission.

 

To Patrick and Mark – Thank YOU for ALL YOU continue to do to account for our Missing in Action!

 

Until they all come home……….   

 

Do NOT forget to click on the YouTube link below to view the Dignified Transfer.

 

From: Patrick ( 1 ) <patrick@patrickjhughes.org>
Sent: 10 April, 2018 10:09
To: Jim 'Moe' Moyer <moehog@verizon.net>
Subject: Fw: Memorial Marker for Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan removed "Today"

 

Morning Moe,

 

Not snowing here Today, as yet!

 

Was at BWI on Saturday for Respectfully, dignified transfer of another Tarawa Marine and his Arlington burial services Yesterday.

Link to DT

https://youtu.be/PcQ4upV2DD0

 

Respectfully,


Patrick

God Bless America

 

Sent: Monday, April 09, 2018 6:52 PM

Subject: Memorial Marker for Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan removed "Today"

 

Please share these images.

 

After leaving Section 60 went to find Pvt Jordan’s Memorial Marker.

 

Just as I got there caught up with Arlington crew that was removing his stone, see attached.

 

Since it states “In Memory Of” there probably will be a new stone placed in Section 60.

Once placed will take a photo and send it along to share.

 

 

 

Have A Safe Trip Home Everyone, Respectfully,

Patrick
God Bless America

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 April, 2018 09:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Sanders, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 26.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1488924/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-sanders-d/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Sanders was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Sanders.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Sanders' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 9 April, 2018 12:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For Naval Aviator Missing From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Reserve Lt. j.g. Irvin E. Rink, accounted for on July 10, 2017, will be

buried April 16 in his hometown.

 

Rink, 25, of Wichita, Kansas, was missing from World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Rink on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Aug. 4, 1943, Rink was a member of Fighting Squadron Twenty Seven

(VF-27), when eight pilots flying F4F-4 Wildcat aircraft took off from the

Russell Islands, Solomon Islands, to escort a Catalina seaplane on a mission

to Enogai Inlet, New Georgia Island.  As the seaplane attempted to land at

Enogai Inlet, the escort aircraft were attacked by Japanese fighter planes.

Following the battle, the element returned to the Russell Islands, however

Rink did not return.  He was reported missing in action on Aug. 4, 1943.

Based on a lack of information regarding his whereabouts, he was declared

deceased on Jan. 8, 2946.

 

In March 2008, Mark Roche, an American diver, photographed an F4F-4 aircraft

inverted on a reef approximately 45 feet under water off the northwest coast

of New Georgia.  He recovered human remains and material evidence from the

wreckage and transferred them to the U.S. Consulate in Honiara, Guadalcanal,

Solomon Islands.

 

In February 2013, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (predecessor to DPAA)

team traveled to the Solomon Islands where they received possible remains

from the crash site.  The remains were sent to the laboratory and

consolidated the remains found in 2008.

 

To identify Rink's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which

matched Rink's records, and historical evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mark Roche for his assistance in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Rink's name is recorded on the Walls of

the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments

Commission site, in the Philippines, along with other MIAs from World War

II. 

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 25-year-old Navy Seaman 2nd Class Frank Wood, of Jackson, Ohio, was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which capsized in the attack by Japanese aircraft. Wood's remains were among those considered unidentified and buried in Honolulu in ...

 

The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Wood was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which capsized in the attack by Japanese aircraft. Wood's remains were among those considered unidentified and buried in Honolulu in the years that followed. In 2015, crews began ...


CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa — The Navy has launched an investigation after a Bible was included in a POW/MIA “Missing Man” table display at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa. Officials were first alerted to the issue Thursday evening, when a complaint was received from the New York-based Law Office of ..
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) is investigating the possibility that human remains and other items recovered from a wartime crash site in Austria last summer may be those of Capt. Dickson. If so, he would be the first of the World War II black aviators known as the Tuskegee Airmen ...
 
The remains of sailor Ora Sharninghouse Jr., whose aircraft crashed in the Pacific in 1944 during World War II, were returned to his sister after 73 years. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency). FINDLAY, Ohio — The remains of a gunner whose plane crashed in the Pacific Ocean during World War II ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 April, 2018 14:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release- Funeral Announcement For USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Frank Wood, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be

buried April 14, in Franklin, North Carolina.

 

Wood, 25, of Jackson, Ohio, was killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma

in World War II.

 

His nephew, Jack Overly, of Colorado, is available for interviews at (970)

586-2559.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Wood on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wood was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Wood. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Wood.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Wood's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory

analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which

matched his records.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veteran's Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,934 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Wood's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others missing from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Richard Downes, president of the Coalition of Families of Korean and Cold War POW/MIAs, said the North had expressed a willingness to return remains as recently as 2016, when he traveled to Pyongyang with a nonprofit headed by Richardson. "If progress is made, even without the remains issue ...

 
According to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency , most of the missing Americans died in major battles or as prisoners of war. Others died along the wayside or in small villages. Many of the losses from aircraft crashes also occurred near battle zones or roads connecting them.

~~~

However, his family never gave up, and through the work of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, his remains were identified using new DNA process in 2017. "they say he was a joker," Hopper's sister Annelle Bowman said. "He liked to tease. All of them were jokers, my brothers. He liked music ...

~~~
CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa — A nonprofit group dedicated to safeguarding servicemembers' constitutional right to religious freedom has lodged a formal complaint with the Navy after a Bible was spotted in a POW/MIA “Missing Man” table display at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa. The complaint was filed ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 April, 2018 21:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: DPAA News Release: Funeral Announcement For Pennsylvania Soldier Missing From Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Master Sgt. George R. Housekeeper, Jr., accounted for on June 15, 2017,

will be buried April 11 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,

D.C.

 

Housekeeper, 28, of Lansdale, Pennsylvania was missing from the Korean War.

 

His son, Danny R. Housekeeper, is available for interviews at

(724)-290-7581.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Housekeeper on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Housekeeper was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion,

31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. The American forces

withdrew south with the Chinese attacks continuing. By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining

soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because

Housekeeper could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle,

he was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950.

 

Housekeeper's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no

returning American prisoners reported Housekeeper as a prisoner of war. Due

to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of

Dec. 31, 1953.

 

In September 2004, a joint U.S. and Korean People's Army (KPA) recovery team

conducted a Joint Recovery Operation at a burial site in the vicinity of

Twikkae Village, Changjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North Korea, on

the east side of the Chosin Reservoir.  The site was consistent with the

31st RCT's location during its withdrawal.  During the excavation, the

recovery team recovered material evidence and several sets of osseous

material.  The remains were sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Housekeeper's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed

Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal

(auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his brother, as well as anthropological

analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,704 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Housekeeper's name is recorded on the

Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
His remains were disinterred in January 2017 and DNA testing at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Laboratory at Hickham Air Force Base, Hawaii finally provided answers. Army Sgt. Christopher ”Ryan” Reynolds accompanied his great uncle's remains on an airline flight Wednesday from Hawaii to ...
 
The remains of a Fort Bragg soldier's great-grandfather have finally come home after nearly 70 years. Sgt. 1st Class Finley James Davis served in the Korean War. He was a Prisoner of War and listed as Missing In Action in December of 1950 and his date of death is reported as of April 30, 1951.
 
Divers recovered the two sailors' remains and immediately turned them over to the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which accounts for Americans who went missing while serving their country. Dr. Scannon said it was a momentous discovery and an emotional experience for all ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced that Davis had been accounted for in August 2017. His remains, originally mislabeled by the North Korean Army, were originally returned to U.S. custody in the fall of 1954, part of a massive swap of each side's dead known as Operation Glory.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 April, 2018 11:54
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Reagan, T.)

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan, missing from the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1484412/
soldier
-missing-from-the-korean-war-accounted-for-reagan-t/

 

In August 1950, Reagan was assigned to Company A, 14th Engineer Combat

Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th

ID's main supply route and the town of Yongsan in an area known as the

Naktong Bulge, in South Korea. Reagan's company, an engineer unit, was

overwhelmed and outmaneuvered by the Korean People's Army, and utilized as

an infantry unit in an attempt to hold open the supply route. On Aug. 12,

1950, the company was able to withdraw to a safe area to account for their

Soldiers. Reagan could not be accounted for and was declared missing in

action.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Reagan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
On Aug. 1, 1943, 2nd Lt. William H. Harth Jr. of Columbia was a bombardier on a B-24D heavy bomber making a run over the Nazi-controlled oil refineries in Ploesti, Romania. It was the first large-scale, low-altitude attack by U.S. heavy bombers on the strategic city. Called Operation Tidal Wave, the ...
 
Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan was among the forces invading the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll in November of 1943, trying to secure a base for further U.S. operations against Japanese forces in the central Pacific, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, a part of the ...

 
The families of 83,000 U.S. service members have never had their loved ones remains returned home, according to the POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA. The Department of Defense agency is tasked with locating the bodies, recovery, and ultimately bringing home veterans who are missing in ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 11:34
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan, accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be

buried April 9 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Jordan, 17, of Pittsburgh, was killed during the battle of Tarawa during

World War II.

 

His niece, Nancy E. Erwin, is available for interviews at (304) 375-6539.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Jordan on file.

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Jordan was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Jordan died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Jordan's

remains were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board

declared Jordan's remains non-recoverable.

              

In July 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA used

advanced investigative techniques to locate further areas believed to

contain the remains of men buried on Tarawa.  The recovered remains were

sent to the laboratory for analysis.

              

To identify Jordan's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his

records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,936 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Jordan's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the others killed or lost in WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name

to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 10:01
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Mathews, P.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews, killed during World War II, has

now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481951/
airman-
killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mathews-p/

 

On May 29, 2943, Mathews was a member of the 422nd Bombardment Squadron,

305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force, participating in a strike

against the German submarine base at Saint-Nazaire, France. The B-17 Mathews

was aboard was hit by enemy fire as it left the target area. Mathews did not

make it out of the bomber before it crashed. Survivors believed the aircraft

crashed approximately 150 kilometers from Saint-Nazaire, near the French

village of Quintin. German reports indicated one casualty was recovered from

the wreckage of the plane, though no burial information was provided.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French government and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mathews' name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Cambridge

American Cemetery in the United Kingdom, an American Battle Monuments

Commission site. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he

has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 10:01
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Bruesewitz, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481936/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-bruesewitz-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Bruesewitz was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Bruesewitz .

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Bruesewitz' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 09:49
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Young, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481917/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-young-r/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Young was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Young.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Young's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 09:41
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Doyle, B.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481903/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-doyle-b/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Doyle was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Doyle.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Doyle's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 09:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Foley, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481891/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-foley-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Foley was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Foley.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Foley's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 April, 2018 09:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From the Korean War Accounted For (Baker, Donald)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, missing from the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1481886/
soldier
-missing-from-the-korean-war-accounted-for-baker-donald/

 

In September 1950, Baker was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th

Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.  He was reported missing in

action on Sept. 6, 1950, as a result of fighting that occurred between his

unit and enemy forces near Haman, South Korea.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Baker's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
 
In January, while trying to identify another unknown Korean War casualty, the POW/MIA Accounting Agency Forensic Team positively identified Sgt. Simon's remains. His remains were returned home to Ohio, where he was finally laid to rest in All Saints Cemetery in Northfield Center. His service was ...
 
 
The remains of a U.S. Marine who was killed during World War II have been returned to his family in Oregon for burial. Marine Corps Pfc. Lyle E. Charpilloz will be buried with full military honors on April 7 in Salem. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency reported Charpilloz, a 19-year-old from ...
 
As the years went on, he and another brother submitted DNA samples to the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in hopes of one day bringing their brother's remains home where they belong. "The family did have a memorial service for him in the church. And we kind of thought, well, that put ...
 
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) - This week has been an emotional rollercoaster for Lisa Bailey, her mother and other family members. On Friday, her mom's cousin's remains were flown to Tampa International Airport with full military honors. Thursday afternoon, Corporal Thomas Mullins was finally laid ...
 
The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used DNA from two cousins to positively identify the Harriman High School student on June 8, 2017, officials said. "As a Tennessee teenager, Tommy bravely answered a call to protect our freedom ...
 
"I mean out of the blue someone from Quantico calls me?" It turns out the Department of Defense had been searching for Tolsono and soldiers like him, too. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) runs a program that searches for missing soldiers, exhumes their remains, and identifies them.
 
Dolores Soltesz, of the Cleveland suburb of Maple Heights, says the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency notified her earlier this year that Simon's remains had been identified. The agency said he was killed in action Sept. 5, 1950. His remains were found the next year but remained unidentified until ...
 
LAS VEGAS (AP) - Military officials say a U.S. Marine from Nevada who was killed in action in the Pacific Ocean battle of Tarawa in World War II will be buried next week with military honors. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Pvt. John M. Tillman of Reno will be returned to ...
 
 
Dolores Soltesz of Maple Heights says the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency notified her earlier this year that Simon's remains had been identified. The agency said he was killed in action Sept. 5, 1950. His remains were found the next year but remained unidentified until this January. Soltesz says ...
 

 

McComb, OHIO (WTVG) - A local sailor killed during World War II will be laid to rest with full military honors. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced Tuesday that the remains Navy Reserve Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Ora H. Sharninghouse, Jr., 22, of McComb, Ohio, were ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Pvt. John M. Tillman of Reno will be returned to his family for burial on April 6 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. Tillman was 21 when he died during fighting against Japanese troops on the small island of Betio in ...
 
Simon's niece, Dolores Soltesz, of Maple Heights, was contacted by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) earlier this year with news that her uncle had been identified. "I was oldest living relative," she said. "It was a big shocker. I couldn't believe it. After 68 years of him being dead, it was a ...
 
 
In February, Kozak's niece was contacted by the U.S. Navy's POW/MIA branch, seeking a DNA sample because they recovered pieces of an aircraft on Palau. Kozak was asked to provide a DNA sample to potentially verify that remains found this year are his uncle, he said. “Please bear in mind that ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Pvt. John M. Tillman of Reno will be returned to his family for burial April 6 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. Tillman was 21 when he died during fighting against Japanese troops on the small island of Betio in ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 12:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Ohio Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Reserve Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Ora H. Sharninghouse, accounted

for on Aug. 10, 2017, will be buried April 7, in Findlay, Ohio.

 

Sharninghouse, of McComb, Ohio, was killed during World War II.

 

His sister, Joan Stough, of Findlay, Ohio, is available for interviews at

(419) 423-1533.

 

The Departmet of Defense has the attached photos of Sharninghouse on file.

 

/////

 

On Sept. 8, 1944, Sharninghouse was a member of the Navy Torpedo Squadron

Eighteen (VT-18), USS Intrepid, on a bombing mission against Japanese

positions on Babelthuap Island, Palau.  As the aircraft reached the target

area, the pilot began a dive near Bokerugeru Point and the crew released its

2,000-pound bomb.  While attempting to pull out of the dive, the bomb hit an

ammunition dump and exploded.  The explosion tore the tail from the

aircraft, causing it to crash off-shore.  Sharninghouse was reported missing

in action.

 

After combat operations in the area ceased, the American Graves Registration

Service- Philippine Command travelled to Palau to investigate and attempt to

recover missing service members.  No record of the crash site was found.

 

In 2005, BentProp Project, a nonprofit NGO of volunteers who work with DPAA

in the Republic of Palau, located a piece of the starboard wing of an

aircraft near Bokerugeru Point.  Subsequent investigations located the main

body of the aircraft offshore.

 

In 2014, possible human remains were located within the main body of the

aircraft, and sent to the Central Identification Laboratory for analysis.

 

In April 2015, a DPAA Underwater Recovery Team excavated the site and

recovered additional remains and material evidence. 

 

To identify Sharninghouse's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed

Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal

(auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family; anthropological analysis,

which matched his records; and historical evidence.

              

DPAA is grateful to BentProp Project for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Sharninghouse's name is recorded on the

Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery in the Philippines, an

American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 12:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Oregon Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Lyle E. Charpilloz, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will

be buried April 7, in Salem, Oregon.

 

Charpilloz, 19, of Silverton, Oregon, was killed during World War II.

 

His sister, Donna Galloway, of Salem, is available for interviews at (503)

363-4567.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Charpilloz on file.

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Charpilloz was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Charpilloz died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but

Charpilloz' remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review

board declared Charpilloz' remains non-recoverable.

              

In May 2014, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA received

remains from a site where Charpilloz was believed to have been buried.  The

recovered remains were sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

On Oct. 17, 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-5 from the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, and

submitted the remains for analysis.  Based on consistent recovery context

and shared DNA, the remains were consolidated with those accessioned in

2014.

              

To identify Charpilloz' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), which matched his

family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as

well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., and the Department of Veterans

Affairs for their partnerships in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Charpilloz' name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the NCMP, an American Battle Monuments Commission

cemetery, along with the others killed or lost in WWII. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 10:04
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Nevada Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pvt. John M. Tillman, accounted for Sept.5, 2017, will be

buried April 6 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Tillman, 21, of Reno, Nevada, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, John Benevides, of San Juan Capistrano, California, is available

for interviews at (949) 493-8304.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Tillman on file.

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Tillman was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 2nd

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Tillman died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Tillman's

remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to

the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification

in 1947.  By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in

the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu.

 

On March 13, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-35 from the NMCP and

sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Tillman's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his

records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Tillman's name is recorded on the Walls

of the Missing at the NCMP, along with the others killed or lost in WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 09:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for South Carolina Airman Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William H. Harth, accounted for on Nov. 3, 2017,

will be buried April 6 in his hometown.

 

Harth, 22, of Columbia, South Carolina, was killed during World War II.

 

His niece, Bonnie Hipkins, of Irmo, South Carolina, is available for

interviews at (803) 361-8616.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Harth on file.

 

/////

 

In the summer of 1943, Harth was a bombardier assigned to the 329th

Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), which was

known as "The Traveling Circus."  On Aug. 1, 1943, he served on a B-24D

aircraft, nicknamed "Hell's Angels," when he was participating in a historic

mission, code-named Operation TIDAL WAVE, which was the first large-scale,

low-altitude attack by U.S. heavy bomber aircraft on Ploesti, Romania. As

Harth's aircraft approached Ploesti, it was hit by German anti-aircraft

fire.  He was declared missing in action when his aircraft failed to return

following the mission.   

 

In the days following the bombing raid, Romanian officials and civilians

recovered and interred the remains of the deceased American Airmen in the

Hero Section of the Bolovan Cemetery.

 

In 1946 and 1947, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) teams

disinterred the remains of Americans killed in the raid, and reinterred them

in the American Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium (now known

as Ardennes American Cemetery).  The AGRC was able to identify 145 Airmen

killed during Operation TIDAL WAVE, including three of Harth's crewmates,

however he was listed as non-recoverable.  One set of unidentified remains

was listed as Unknown X-5192 Neuville.

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-5192 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, on April 11,

2017, Unknown X-5192 was disinterred from Neuville and sent to DPAA for

analysis.

 

To identify Harth's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental comparisons and anthropological

analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Harth's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery in Italy, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the others who are missing from

the World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he

has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 09:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for North Carolina Airman Killed During Vietnam War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Air Force Col. Edgar F. Davis, accounted for on Dec. 19, 2017, will be

buried April 6 in his hometown.

 

Davis, 32, of Goldsboro, North Carolina was killed during the Vietnam War.

 

His daughter, Martha Morton, of Oxford, North Carolina, is available for

interviews at (919) 693-1898.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Davis on file.

 

/////

 

On Sept. 17, 1968, Davis was a navigator aboard a RF-4C Phantom

fighter-bomber aircraft, assigned to the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance

Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing.  Davis and his pilot were on a

night photo-reconnaissance mission over the Lao People's Democratic Republic

(L.P.D.R.) when they were shot down by anti-aircraft artillery fire.  The

pilot ejected out of the aircraft and was rescued, however no contact could

be established with Davis.  Because of this, he was declared missing in

action.  Search and rescue efforts were suspended after failing to locate

Davis or the aircraft wreckage.  Davis was later declared deceased.

 

Between August 2001 and February 2015, joint U.S./L.P.D.R. teams

investigated a crash site six times that correlated with Davis' loss.

Excavations recovered personal effects, but analysis could not confirm

whether Davis was in the aircraft at the time of the crash.  A subsequent

team excavated an ejection seat location associated with the crash.

 

In 2015, a Stony Beach debriefer in Bangkok, Thailand obtained information

from a villager concerning the burial location of a U.S. service member in

Boulapha District, Khammouan Province, L.P.D.R.  The villager claimed that

in 1968, his father came across the remains of a U.S. pilot and buried them

near his house.  The villager turned over bone fragments, which were sent to

DPAA for analysis.       

 

To identify Davis' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as material and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Stony Beach and the government of Laos for their

partnerships in this recovery.

              

Today there are 1,600 American servicemen and civilians still unaccounted

for from the Vietnam War. Davis' name is recorded on the Courts of the

Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along

with others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 08:54
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Goldwater, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am

 

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1476576/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-goldwater-j/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Goldwater was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Goldwater.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Goldwater's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 March, 2018 08:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Florida Soldier Killed During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Roy J. Hopper, accounted for on June 23, 2017, will be buried

April 6, in Dayton, Ohio.

 

Hopper, 21, of Miami, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His brother, Ronald Hopper, of Paducah, Kentucky, is available for

interviews at (270) 442-9090.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Hopper on file.

 

/////

 

In July 1950, Hopper was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company,

2nd Battalion 19th Infantry Regiment.  He was reportedly killed in action on

July 31, 1950, when his battalion, along with another battalion, was engaged

in a fighting withdrawal against North Korean forces in Chinju, South Korea.

The enemy had control of the area following the battle, preventing a search

for his remains.  After the battle Hopper's remains were not identified.  

 

In early 1951, the graves at Masan cemetery were exhumed and the unknowns

were transferred to the U.S. Army's Central Identification unit in Kokura,

Japan.  Remains that could not be identified were transferred to the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, including "Unknown

X-119."

 

After thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-119 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, X-119 was

disinterred on Jan. 9, 2017 and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Hopper's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his brother and sister, as well as dental and anthropological

analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Hopper's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5543759/74-years-later-pilot-crashed-France-returns-home.html
 

 

US pilot Lt. Frank Fazekas was flying a P-47 Thunderbolt when it came down on a French farm 20 miles from the English Channel after being hit by German fire in May 1944...


 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`
 


 

The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) reports Sgt. McAfee was killed during combat in North Korea in late November 1950. He was a member of Company F, 2nd Battallion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force fighting against units of the Chinese ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 26 March, 2018 12:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Arkansas Soldier Missing From Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. William C. McDowell, accounted for on January 10, will be buried

April 4 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

McDowell, 20, of Stuttgart, Arkansas, was missing from the Korean War.

 

His daughter, Debra Burtram, of De Witt, Arkansas, is available for

interviews at (870) 946-3275.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of McDowell on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, McDowell was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

McDowell could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he

was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

McDowell's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning

Americans reported McDowell as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack

of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 15, 1954.

              

On Dec. 1, 1994, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes of remains,

which were purportedly recovered from Hwangcho-ri, Changjin County, South

Hamgyong Province, North Korea.  The remains were accessioned to the Central

Identification Laboratory, a predecessor to DPAA, in Hawaii.

 

To identify McDowell's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, which matched his family, anthropological analysis, which

matched his records, and material evidence.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  McDowell's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) reports Sgt. McAfee was killed during combat in North Korea in late November 1950. He was a member of Company F, 2nd Battallion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force fighting against units of the Chinese ...
 
In 2015, as part of the USS Oklahoma Project, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, through a partnership with the Department of Veterans Affairs, exhumed all of the unknown remains from the USS Oklahoma, and began the lengthy identification process. Recovered remains were sent to the ...
LAKE PRESTON | A South Dakota sailor who died in the Pearl Harbor attack will be buried in his hometown next week. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Porter Rich of Lake Preston are being returned to his family for burial with full military ...
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications are still being made. Corporal Mullins will be laid to rest at the Bay Pines National Cemetery in St. Petersburg on March 29. The service is ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 March, 2018 12:32
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For South Dakota Sailor Killed on USS Oklahoma During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Porter L. Rich, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017,

will be buried March 31 in his hometown.

 

Rich, 27, of Lake Preston, South Dakota, was killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His, niece, Mary Hauck, is available for interviews at (605) 847-4481.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Rich on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Rich was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Rich. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Rich.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Rich's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched

his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to

include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his

records.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veteran's Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Rich's name is recorded on the Walls of

the Missing at the NMCP, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will

be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: FW: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Van Vleet, G.)
Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2018 12:05:51 -0400
From: moehog@verizon.net
To: 'Moe Moyer' <moehog@verizon.net>
 

Welcome HOME Captain Van Vleet!

A Smart salute and a tip of the hat to History Flight - http://historyflight.com/nw/ - for their unwavering commitment to 'Leave No Man Behind'!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 March, 2018 11:59
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Van Vleet, G.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, killed during World War II, has now

been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1474434/
airman-
killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-van-vleet-g/

 

On Jan. 21, 1944, Van Vleet was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron,

(Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Helen Island,

Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when the B-24J bomber aircraft he was a

passenger on crashed shortly after take-off.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., the Department of Veterans Affairs

and the Republic Kiribati of for their partnerships in this mission.

 

Van Vleet's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 March, 2018 11:05
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Pennsylvania Soldier Killed During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon, accounted for on Jan. 11, 2018, will be

buried March 31 in  Northfield, Ohio.

 

Simon, 34, of Grindstone, Pennsylvania, was killed during the Korean war.

 

His great-niece, Brenda Binns, is available for interviews at (216)

392-5684.

 

The family has provided the attached photo of Simon.

 

/////

 

In September 1950, Simon was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in a defense of the

Pusan Perimeter, a large defensive line west and north of Pusan, South

Korea.  Simon was reported to have been killed in action Sept. 5, 1950, but

his remains were not located following the battle. 

 

In May 1951, American Graves Registration Service personnel recovered three

sets of remains after a villager notified them of remains near his village

on Hill 762.  The remains were sent to the Tanggok United Nations Military

Cemetery.  One set of remains, identified as Unknown X-1085 Tanggok, were

later transferred to the Central Identification Unit-Kokura for possible

identification.  However, an identification could not be established and the

remains were declared unidentifiable and interred at the National Memorial

Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In October 2017, based on research and analysis, DPAA disinterred Unknown

X-1085 from the Punchbowl and accessioned the remains to the laboratory for

identification.

 

To identify Simon's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis,

including anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which

matched his records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the South Korean government and the Department of

Veterans Affairs for their assistance in this recovery.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Simon's

name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Courts of the Missing at

the NMCP, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Johnson was born in 1924 and drafted into the Army in 1943 while living in Malvern. He served in the 92nd Infantry Division, the only African-American combat infantry division in Europe, according to a news release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Johnson's unit fought in northern Italy, ...

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency recently matched DNA from the remains with a sample from Johnson's brother Jesse, allowing Johnson's return home to Arkansas and the long-awaited closure provided by Thursday's funeral. Johnson was the oldest of six siblings, and the two brothers and ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 22 March, 2018 10:15
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Tennessee Soldier Captured During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Thomas H. Mullins, accounted for on June 8, 2017, will be buried

March 29 in St. Petersburg, Florida.

 

Mullins, 18, of Harriman, Tennessee, was captured and killed during the

Korean War.

 

His cousin, Lisa Bailey, is available for interviews at (813) 752-6647.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Mullins on file.

 

/////

 

On Nov. 2, 1950, Mullins was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.  He was reported missing in action

on Nov. 2, 1950, following combat between the Chinese People's Volunteer

Forces (CPVF) and his regiment, in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea.

Approximately 600 men were killed, captured or missing from his battalion.

Mullins was subsequently declared missing in action. 

 

At the end of the war, during "Operation Big Switch," where all remaining

prisoners of war were returned, former prisoners were interviewed.  One

reported that Mullins died while being held in POW Camp 5, Pyokdong, North

Korea.

 

On Dec. 14, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes containing

remains believed to be unaccounted for Americans from the Korean War.  The

remains were reportedly recovered from Tongju-ri, Pyokdong County, North

Pyongan Province, North Korea, which was the known location of POW Camp 5.

 

To identify Mullins' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, which matched two cousins, as well as anthropological

analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams. Mullins' name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with the

others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 22 March, 2018 09:09
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For New Jersey Airman Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Frank A. Fazekas, accounted for on Aug. 7, 2017,

will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,

D.C.

 

Fazekas, 22, of Trenton, New Jersey, was killed during World War II.

 

His son, Frank S. Fazekas, of New Hartford, New York, is available for

interviews at (315) 372-5856.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Fazekas on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

/////

 

On May 27, 1944, Fazekas was a member of the 22nd Fighter Squadron, 36th

Fighter Group, when he was returning from a mission over northern France and

his P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft came under enemy fire.  His aircraft crashed

in a field north of the French village of Buysscheure.  His remains were not

recovered and the U.S. Army reported him deceased on May 27, 1944.

 

In July 1946, a British recovery team investigated a crash site associated

with Fazekas' loss.  The team recovered aircraft parts and personal effects,

but his remains were not recovered.  Based on this information, a Board of

Officers of the American Graves Registration Command declared his remains

unrecoverable.

 

On July 16, 2012, a team of historians and an anthropologist from the

Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command

(both predecessors to DPAA) visited the crash site.  The team received

assistance from local residents and officials, as well as research from Mr.

Joss Leclercq, a French historian.  In August 2016, a team from the

University of Wisconsin-Madison, augmented by DPAA, excavated the crash

site, recovering possible remains.  The remains were sent to DPAA on August

31, 2016.

 

To identify Fazekas' remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner

System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), which matched his family, as well as

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial

evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Leclercq, the French government and the University

of Wisconsin-Madison for their assistance in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,048 service members

(approximately 26,000 assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted

for from World War II.  Fazekas' name is recorded on the Tablets of the

Missing at Ardennes American cemetery in Neupré, Belgium, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette

will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

They were held in Italy, sent to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for DNA analysis in 2016 and later identified as Johnson's, the department said. The body was scheduled to arrive at the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport in Little Rock on Tuesday evening. A plane-side honors ceremony ...

They were held in Italy, sent to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for DNA analysis in 2016 and later identified as Johnson's, the department said. The body is scheduled to arrive at the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport in Little Rock on Tuesday evening, officials said. A plane-side honors ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 March, 2018 08:59
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Outland, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1469293/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-outland-j/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Outland was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Outland.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Outland's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A spokesman for the agency contacted me because of a Memorial Day column I wrote in 2013 listing the 15 Anne Arundel County men killed or considered as missing during the Korean War. Interment of Jubb's remains is still being worked out. The POW/MIA agency says it notified his family Tuesday, ...

Nearly three-quarters of a century after he was killed in the ferocious World War II battle chronicled in the 1977 film “A Bridge Too Far,” Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz is coming home to Los Angeles. The U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Thursday, March 15, 2018, that Rosenkrantz's ...

Tulsa County Assistant District Attorney Kevin Gray, standing near memorabilia in his office, talks about the wreckage of the Tulsamerican, a B-24 Liberator bomber assembled in Tulsa near the end of World War II. The plane has been found in the sea off the coast of Croatia. STEPHEN PINGRY/Tulsa ...

They are now accounted for by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. According to his obituary, Wood was born in Jackson, Ohio on November 16, 1916. He enlisted in the Navy in 1940 at the age of 23, and reported for duty on the USS Oklahoma on October 12, 1940. The following year, he and ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 March, 2018 12:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Jubb, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. James I. Jubb, killed during the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1467182/soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-jubb-j/

 

In August 1950, Jubb was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry

Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, his unit suffered heavy losses while

fighting units of the North Korean People's Army in the vicinity of the

Naktong River, South Korea. Jubb was reported missing in action on Aug. 10,

1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit. His remains were later

declared unrecoverable.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Jubb's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at  www.facebook.com/dodpaa  or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 March, 2018 11:43
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Marine Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Manuel Menendez, accounted for on Aug. 30, 2017,

will be buried March 22 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,

D.C.

 

Menendez, 20, of Elizabeth, New Jersey; , was killed during the Battle of

Tarawa in World War II.

 

His niece, Diane Mazur, of Middletown, Maryland, is available for interviews

at (240) 490-7667.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Menendez on file.

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Menendez was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Menendez died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Menendez'

remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to

the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification

in 1947.  By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in

the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the

Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In October 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-168 from the NMCP and

sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Menendez' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched

his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records,

as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veteran's Affairs for their

partnership in this mission

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,948 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Menendez' name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ann Mills-Griffiths, board chair and chief executive officer of the Virginia-based National League of POW/MIA Families, was incensed when told the flags had been removed from Rhinebeck town and village halls. The flag dates to 1970, when an MIA wife and member of the National League of POW/MIA ...

The remains of a U.S. soldier from Michigan who died while in captivity during the Korean War have been identified and are being returned to the state for burial. The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of 22-year-old Army Sgt. 1st Class Harry Harkness of Lansing will be .
 

“His remains were not recovered at the time,” the commission said. “Through the work of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the remains of Cpl. Hopper were accounted for in 2017. His name remains permanently inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.” Hopper was born ...

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System conducted the tests. Harkness will be buried in Lansing on March 17. His family has asked for privacy. Another 7,709 Americans are still unaccounted for from the Korean War. The Defense Department has their ...

 

 
... as U.S. Republic of Korea Army (ROKA) and United Nations Command (UNC) forces were deployed in defensive positions across the South Korean peninsula, according to a news release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. His regiment was located in the town of Yonghyon-ni, and was ...

As DNA technology advanced over the years, the federal government's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has gotten more aggressive in using DNA evidence to identify them. Last year, Abner got his news: the previously unidentified remains known simply as X-14155 were Leroy. He was coming ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]

Sent: 9 March, 2018 12:33

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Soldier Captured During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Harry E. Harkness, accounted for on Oct. 30, 2017, will

be buried March 17 in his hometown.

 

Harkness, 22, of Lansing, Michigan, was captured and killed during the

Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Harkness on file.

 

 

/////

 

On In November 1950, Harkness was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Unsan, North Korea.  Harkness was reported missing in action as of Nov. 2,

1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

 

Following the war, during an operation known as "Operation Big Switch," when

prisoners of war were returned, returning Americans from Pyoktong Camp 5

reported that Harkness had been captured and died while at POW Camp 5

sometime between January and April 1951.

 

On Dec. 21, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 34 boxes containing

remains reportedly to be unaccounted-for U.S. servicemen from the Korean

War.  One set of remains came from Tongju-ri, Pyokdong County, North Pyongan

Province, North Korea, which corresponds to the known location of POW Camp

5, where Harkness was believed to have died.

 

To identify Harkness' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis

which matched his records; and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Harkness' name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the other MIAs from the Korean War.  A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

However, after many years of erosion, the cross reemerged, and can be seen once again. The site has been turned into a memorial to prisoners of war and MIA soldiers everywhere. Known for a time as Iron Cross Park, it was renamed POW/MIA Park in the 1990s. It currently has a viewing platform for ...

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency confirmed this month that bone material and other evidence found in a farm field in northern Germany belonged to the 24-year-old airman from Harrisonburg, Virginia. Chuck Prichard, a spokesman for the agency, said officials will notify his family. He declined ...

There are about 83,000 Americans still missing from past conflicts, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank's U.S. Army squadron was protecting allied bombers flying on a mission to Bremen, in northern Germany, when it encountered 40 to 50 German aircraft.

This week Retired General Robert Foglesong wrote a letter on behalf of the US-Russia Joint Commision on POW/MIA's to the mayor asking for the city council to reconsider. "I believe that the proposed memorial in Elizabeth City will be an opportunity for your fair city to be recognized on the world stage," ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 8 March, 2018 10:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Shank, W.)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, killed During World War II, has
now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1461087/
airman-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-shank-w/

On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank was a pilot with the 338th Fighter Squadron, 55th
Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force, flying
his P-38 on a mission to Bremen, Germany. Shank was killed after engaging in
fierce enemy action.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days
prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Oeltjebruns and the American Battle Monuments
Commission for their assistance with this disinterment and recovery.

Shank's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Cambridge
American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in the United
Kingdom, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed
next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — The remains of a soldier captured during the Korean War will be brought home to his family here in Columbus. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the remains of Army Pfc. Leroy W. Bryant, 22, is expected to be returned to his family here in Columbus, ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 7 March, 2018 10:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Keffer, H.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1460079/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-keffer-h/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Keffer was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Keffer.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Keffer's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 7 March, 2018 10:53
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Mulligan, H.)

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, killed during World War II,

has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1460076/marine-killed-
during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mulligan-h/

 

On May 30, 1945, Mulligan was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd

Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division, engaged in heavy fighting against

Japanese forces on Hill 27, on the northern bank of the Kokuba Estuary,

Okinawa, Japan. A large crypt loaded with ammunition exploded, wounding

dozens and killing Mulligan.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior  to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mulligan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the other MIAs from

 

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

 

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

After almost 70 years, a Columbus family will get a sort of reunion with a long lost loved one. In 1951, 22-year-old Leroy Bryant left to fight in the Korean War. It wouldn't be until 2018 that he would come home to Columbus. His younger brother Abner was 11 years old at the time. He's now the only living ...

 

The operation, led by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), had been years in the making. Back in 2015 and 2016, preliminary investigations of the sunken aircrafts, an F6F-3 Hellcat and a TBM1-C Avenger, were conducted, sparking the excavation to find the long-lost military service ...

When they were students at Southeast Missouri State University, Buck and his wife got POW/MIA bracelets. Buck's first one, Staff Sgt. Russell Bott, a member of the Army Special Forces lost in Laos. His wife got Col William Henderson Mason, who died piloting a blind-bat mission dropping flares along ...

 
The recovery team completed the mission on Feb. 25, but won't release the identity of the human remains until it can verify whose they are and notify the next of kin, the U.S. 7th Fleet said in the statement. The mission was coordinated by a number of teams: The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
But with continuous work by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Harrison's remains were identified late last year. And the search for family led to Sachse, Texas, and John Welnack Sr., 88, his cousin and closest living relative. Which is why a Marine from Detroit, Michigan finally came home to ...

 
To many veterans the POW/MIA flag holds a very significant place in their hearts. This bill would make it mandatory to fly the POW/MIA flag on state property if they have the poles in place to properly display it along with the US and Missouri flags. If they do not have a flag and a local VFW provides one, ...
Marty Eddy, Michigan State Coordinator for the National League of POW/MIA Families and Secretary/Treasurer of the POW Committee of Michigan, reports that native Detroiter and former World War II Prisoner of War Tuskegee Airman Lt. Col. Alex Jefferson (USAF Ret.) visited the Defense POW/MIA ...

 
Headed by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the team worked from aboard the USNS Salvor near Ngerekebesang Island, completing work on Feb. 25. Divers worked seven days a week, often 12 hours a day, in search of remains belonging to servicemembers shot down in aircraft in 1944, the ...


Norwood was a member of the national Korean War Prisoners of War Association, and elected as one of its officers. That group is now virtually inactive, activities ... “I fly the POW/MIA flag, because those were my closest friends and my buddies, and I can't ignore them. I've got to keep their memory alive.”.

FORT SHAFTER, HAWAII—Stars & Stripes reports that human remains have been recovered from sunken World War II–era airplanes off the coast of Palau by a joint underwater recovery team of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and civilians led by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. The remains are ...
 
The U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs, acting with the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, proposed the monument last spring to honor Allied aviators who died in a plane crash in the Pasquotank River in 1945. Soviet aviators were brought to the U.S. to train with Catalina aircraft ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 28 February, 2018 07:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Georgia Soldier Captured During the Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Leroy W. Bryant, accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be buried

March 9, 2018 in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Bryant, 22, of Autreyville, Georgia, was captured and killed during the

Korean War.

 

His half-brother, Abner Bryant, of Blacklick, Ohio, is available for

interviews at (614) 440-8719.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Bryant on file.

 

/////

 

In early February 1951, Bryant was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, as U.S. Republic of Korea Army

(ROKA) and United Nations Command (UNC) forces were deployed in defensive

positions across the South Korean peninsula.  On February 6, Bryant's

regiment was located in the town of Yonghyon-ni, and was tasked to determine

location, position and strength of enemy forces.  Enemy forces attacked,

forcing them to withdraw to new positions.  Because Bryant could not be

accounted for by his unit after the attack, he was reported missing action

as of Feb. 6, 1951, near Yanghyon-ni, South Korea.

 

Throughout the war, the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) and Korean

People's Army (KPA) provided lists of American servicemen held in their

custody.  Bryant's name appeared on a list of Americans who died while in

custody of communist forces, informally known as the "Christmas List."

However, there was no way to confirm this report and Bryant's status

remained listed as missing in action.

 

Following the war, a returning prisoner from Bryant's regiment reported that

friends told him Bryant died while being marched north to prisoner of war

Camp 1, located along the Yalu River, near the village of Changsong.  Based

on this information, the U.S. Army amended his status to deceased.

 

From August to November 1954, the United Nations, Chinese Communist Forces

(CCF) and North Korea exchanged war dead at Munsan-ni, South Korea.  On

Sept. 7, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of war

cemetery at Camp 1 and 3, Changsong, North Korea, were sent to the Central

Identification Unit in Kokura, Japan, for attempted identification.  The set

of remains was designated "X-14155" and was transferred to the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu and

interred as a Korean War Unknown. 

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-14155 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, X-14155 was

disinterred on Jan. 9, 2017, and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Bryant's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental, anthropological and chest radiograph

comparison analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,709 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Bryant's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl in Honolulu, along with the others who are

missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he

has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
The project was headed by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which deployed an Underwater Recovery Team (URT) comprised of U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force service members and Department of Defense civilians that were embarked aboard the USNS Salvor. “It's very labor ...

The recovery project was spearheaded by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA, and was based aboard the USNS Salvor, a Navy rescue and salvage ship operated by civilian mariners. An underwater recovery team consisting of U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force service members performed ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 26 February, 2018 08:23
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Gibson, G.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, killed during the attack

on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1449956/uss-oklahoma-
sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-gibson-g/

 

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gibson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Gibson.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Gibson's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 22 February, 2018 10:40
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Husak, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, killed during World War II, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1447646/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-husak-l/

 

 

In January 1945, Husak was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th

Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division, serving in the European theater.

Husak was killed during a combat patrol on Jan. 30, 1945 in Germany’s

Hürtgen Forest. The offensive in the forest was one of the longest battles

the United States fought during World War II, lasting for nearly five

months.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Husak’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing, the Henri-Chapelle

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Hombourg,

Belgium. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 22 February, 2018 10:27
To: Undisclosed recipients: