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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

 

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2018

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018

2017

Browse records in  that     Search      
 
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Pfc. Albert E. Quintero U.S. Army Battery D, 15th Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Self-propelled Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 12/14/2017
List posted 01/18/18

 
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.
 

 
Nearly 300 people are expected at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., to hear an update about their lost loved ones from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. The agency is charged with finding the remains of members of the U.S. military lost in World War II, ...

 

 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ewart T. Sconiers, 27, of DeFuniak Springs, will be buried in his hometown January 27th. On October 21, 1942, Sconiers was part of an attack to bomb a German u-boat pen in France when the aircraft he was on received ...
 
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL -- (WTVY) A local man who died as a prisoner of war during World War II will return to his family in DeFuniak Springs to be laid to rest. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ewart T. Sconiers, 27, of DeFuniak Springs, will be buried in his ...

 

 
SAN FRANCISCO (BCN). The remains of a U.S. Army soldier missing since the Korean War have been identified as belonging to a San Francisco resident. Private First Class James J. Leonard was reported killed in action while defending the village of Yongdong, South Korea, on July 25, 1950. He was ...
Until his remains were found, Leonard was among the 83,000 members of the U.S. military who have not returned from foreign combat, said Chuck Prichard, a spokesman for the POW/MIA Accounting Agency. About 7,700 of those are from the Korean War. “Our job is to try to find them and to bring ...

 

 
MILLSBORO, Del. (AP) - The recently accounted for remains of a U.S. serviceman who died during World War II are being returned to his family in Delaware for burial with full military honors. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced in a news release Wednesday that Army Air Forces 2nd ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2018 10:07
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (McDowell, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. William C. McDowell, missing from the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.  Army Cpl. William C. McDowell, missing from the Korean War,

has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1418045/
soldier-missing-from-korean-war-accounted-for-mcdowell-w/

 

In late November, 1950, McDowell was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

McDowell could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he

was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

McDowell's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Courts of the

Missing in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along

with the other MIAs from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2018 10:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Missouri Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Reserve Chief Water Tender Paul R. Wright, accounted for on Sept. 1,

2017, will be buried January 25 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Wright, 41, of Meadville, Missouri, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His niece, Janet Phlegar Solosth, of Utah, is available for interviews at

(435) 652-3533.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Wright on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wright was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Wright. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

(NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military

board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable,

including Wright.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Wright's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory

analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which

matched his records.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Wright's name is recorded at the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2018 10:40
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Seaton, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1418102/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-seaton-c/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Seaton was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Seaton.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Seaton's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2018 10:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For New Jersey Sailor Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class John E. Savidge, accounted for on Sept. 1, 2017, will

be buried January 26 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu.

 

Savidge, 20, of Linden, New Jersey, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Edwin Taylor, of Sharpsburg, Maryland, is available for

interviews at (301) 223-6956.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Savidge on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Savidge was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Savidge. 

              

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Savidge.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Savidge's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory

analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which

matched his records.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veteran's Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Savidge's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Died in the hands of his German Captors. 1st Lt. Sconiers was a Prisoner of War from 21 October 1942 until his death 24 January 1944!

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2018 12:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Airman Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ewart T. Sconiers, accounted for on April 5, 2017,

will be buried January 27 in his hometown, on the 74th anniversary of his

initial burial following his death in World War II.

 

Sconiers, 27, of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, died as a prisoner of war.

 

His niece, Pamela Whitelock, of New Albany, Ohio, is available for

interviews at (850) 814-1982.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Sconiers on file.

 

/////

 

On Oct. 21, 1942, Sconiers was a member of the 414th Bombardment Squadron,

97th Bombardment Group, serving as the bombardier on the B-17F Flying

Fortress, during a mission to bomb the German U-boat pens at Lorient,

France.  During the attack, the aircraft received severe damage, but the

entire crew parachuted safely, landing in water near Brest, France, where

they were picked up by a French fishing vessel and turned over to German

forces as prisoners of war.  The Americans were sent to Dulag Luft in

Oberusal, Germany, for interrogation, and on Nov. 11, 1942, Sconiers was

transferred to Stalag Luft II in Sagan, Germany (present-day Zagan, Poland),

where he remained until Jan. 9, 1944. 

 

Sconiers was admitted to the camp hospital in early January after exhibiting

erratic behavior and complaining of severe ear pain following a fall on ice.

He was subsequently transferred to the reserve hospital in Luben, Germany

(present-day Lubin, Poland), where he died on Jan. 24, 1944.  Sconiers was

buried by a detachment of fellow prisoners in grave number seven of the POW

section of the municipal cemetery in Luben/Schleswig on Jan. 27, 1944, near

the remains of five French officers.

 

In April 1948, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRS) conducted a

field investigation in Lubin, but failed to locate Sconiers' burial site,

and were unable to find any records of deaths or burials in the area. 

 

Between 2006 and 2015, there were multiple searches conducted to find

Sconiers' remains, with negative results, including a full excavation in

Allies Park in Lubin.

 

In September 2015, an independent researcher identified a cross with

Sconiers' name in a French military cemetery in Gdansk, Poland.

 

In October 2015, DPAA requested assistance from the French Embassy in

locating records related to the grave.  Historical records revealed there

were no French soldiers who died during WWII with the name Sconiers.

Additionally, documentation revealed that several French soldiers who were

reported to have died in the Lubin region were later reburied in the French

Military Cemetery in Gdansk, possibly linking Sconiers to the new burial

site.

 

In July 2016, the French Government and the Polish Council for the

Protection of Struggle and Martyrdom granted DPAA permission to disinter the

remains at the cemetery.  In September 2016, the remains were disinterred

and sent to DPAA's Central Identification Laboratory Annex at Offutt Air

Force Base, Nebraska, for analysis.

 

To identify Sconiers' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and DNA analysis, which

matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his

records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French Embassy, the French Government and the Polish

Council for the Protection of Struggle and Martyrdom for their assistance in

this identification.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Sconiers' name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Belgium, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
    Stanley Stegnerski
The recently accounted for remains of a U.S. serviceman who died during World War II are being returned to his family in Delaware for burial with full military honors. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced in a news release Wednesday that Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Stanley F. Stegnerski ...

 

 
     Stanley Stegnerski
With a long list of sites to explore, it wasn't until the summer of 2016 when a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency team excavated the crash site, finding possible remains, material evidence and personal equipment. Scientists used mitochondrial DNA analysis to match Stegnerski with family, as well as ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 17 January, 2018 13:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Soldier Killed During the Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. James J. Leonard, Jr., accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will be

buried January 23 in his hometown.

 

Leonard, 22, of San Francisco, was killed during the Korean War. 

 

His cousin, Michael Hart is available for interviews at (650) 255-1149.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Leonard on file.

 

/////

 

In July 1950, Leonard was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry

Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.  In the early hours of July 20, Leonard's

regiment arrived east of Yongdong, South Korea, and began preparing to

assume the defense of the city.  By July 23, Korean People's Army (KPA)

units began attacking American defenses and took control of Yongdong by July

25.  Leonard was reported as killed in action on July 25, 1950.

 

In June 1952, the 392nd Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

searches of the area around Yongdong.  All remains recovered were sent to

the Army Graves Registration Service Central Identification Unit in Kokura,

Japan, but Leonard's remains were not identified.

 

In an effort to account for its own war losses, South Korea developed an

organization known as the Ministry of National Defense Agency for Killed in

Action Recovery and Identification (MAKRI).  In early 2017, a local

construction crew uncovered possible human remains and material evidence

during a road excavation near Yongdong village.  On March 30, a MAKRI

recovery team recovered the remains and sent them to the MAKRI-Central

Identification Laboratory in Seoul.  The remains were subsequently sent to

the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Leonard's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory

analysis, including dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his

records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the South Korean government for their assistance in this

recovery.

 

Today, 7,713 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Leonard's name is recorded at the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 17 January, 2018 12:47
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Airman Killed During World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Stanley F. Stegnerski, accounted for on Aug. 16,

2017, will be buried January 22 in Millsboro, Deleware.

 

Stegnerski, 25, of Chester, Pennsylvania, was killed during World War II.

 

His family member, Janice Tunnell, of Wilmington, Delaware, is available for

interviews at (302) 593-9543.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Stegnerski on file.

 

/////

 

On Nov. 21, 1944, Stegnerski was the pilot of a P-51D Mustang, taking off

from Royal Air Force Base 133 at East Wretham, Norfolk, England, on a bomber

escort mission over Germany.  Over Merseberg, Germany, the American aircraft

were attacked by German fighters.  Stegnerski's group closed in on a group

of 20 German fighters and opened fire.  He was last seen by his wingman as

they prepared to attack the German Focke-Wulf fighters. 

 

A German shoot-down report noted a P-51 Mustang, with a tail number similar

to Stegnerski's, crashed on Nov. 21, 1944 on a road between Dollstedt and

Grafentonna, Germany.  The report stated the pilot could not be identified

and the remains were buried in Grafentonna.  Based on this information and

no information concerning Stegnerski as a prisoner of war, the Secretary of

War declared him deceased on Nov. 22, 1945.

 

Because Grafentonna, Germany was in Soviet control after 1947, the American

Graves Registration Command (AGRC) were restricted in their investigation.

 

In 2008, German nationals Mathias Leich and Hans-Gunther Ploes, provided

information and analysis that led to a U.S. team to investigate a crash site

near Dollstadt and Grafentonna, where the team recovered a piece of engine

cowling matching Stegnerski's aircraft. 

 

In July and August 2016, a DPAA team excavated the crash site, finding

possible osseous remains, material evidence and personal equipment.  The

remains were sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Stegnerski's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which

matched his records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Leich and Mr. Ploes for their assistance in this

recovery mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Stegnerski's name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American

Battle Monuments Commission in Belgium, along with the others missing from

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
DUPONT — The hunt for family of a World War II soldier missing since October 1944 has shifted — and appears to be over. Military officials initially contacted the Nanticoke Historical Society, looking for family of Private Anthony Laskowski, believed to have been a Nanticoke native killed in a massive ...
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency recently recovered remains in that area and are trying to link them with the missing through family DNA testing. The organization recently reached out to the Nanticoke Historical Society to help track down relatives of Laskowski. Chet Zaremba, the group's vice ...

From: John Zimmerlee [mailto:john.zimmerlee@gmail.com]
Sent: 12 January, 2018 17:08
To: John Zimmerlee <john.zimmerlee@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Article on POW/MIA Korean War

 

See attached

This is my latest article

Please feel free to post, edit, critique, respond, pass along, . . . as you please!

John

 

 

Missing Airmen Who Obviously Match Unidentified Remains
by John Zimmerlee

 

The Korean War has been over for almost 65 years . . . or has it?

For the families of any war, we expect our loved-ones to come home or be told when and where they died . . . and when to expect their remains to be returned if possible.  Most of the Korean War families of the Missing were essentially told, “Our government doesn’t know what happened to them, so stop asking questions and forget about him!”

 

Some of us did not accept that answer and we now have the forensic files on more than 800 unknown remains which clearly identify some and will lead to the identification of others.

 

N-17156 was found at location CT126649.  That code narrows down the location within 500 feet. The remains was so badly damage that the race, height and age could not be determined or even estimated.
 

Yet, it was found with aviation parts included. Duh . . . a plane crash! A quick study of air losses in that vicinity indicates that Willie Wall went down within 2.5 miles . . . and Thomas Helton, John Maniatty, and Bernard McManaman all went down within 2 miles of where this remains was found. Perhaps, the families would like to know?

 

N-17152 surfaced from CT869718. There were no ID tags but aircraft parts were included. Remains were Caucasian and over age 30. Only two missing airmen fit location . . . Walter Clinnin and Marce Dunn, but only Walter was over 30. If anyone knows his family, please contact me.

 

N-17157 surfaced from CT154636, Caucasian, age 22-24, no ID tags but AF vest included. Ideal candidates include Robert Gross, Charles Gunther, Ernest Oliphant, Joseph Ratti, and William Roy. Only families of Oliphant and Ratti could be found.

 

N-17121 was found at BU869452.  It was determined to be Caucasian, approx. 68.5” tall, and age 25-30. It was shipped as unknown but an oxygen mask and a/c parts were included. Only two airmen come close . . . Elwood Brey (23 years old) and Joseph Collins (29).

 

N-17110 surfaced from BU467631, undetermined race, but over 30 years old, and included aircraft parts.  Only two come close . . . Lyle Moore (27) and Herbert Smith (35)!

 

N-17111 was found at BU471625.  Just by location that narrowed the candidates down to just Edgar Gray, Lyle Moore, and Herbert Smith. Yet, the age was 30 plus.  Only Herbert was that old and his estimated crash site is less than a mile away from the remains! Like most, I haven’t found any family members to share this with!

 

N-17118 was found at BU729552, Caucasian, 68-70” tall, age 28-32.  There were no ID tags or teeth, but included flying suit and Mae West. Another . . . Duh! That fits Henry Dixon, Robert Finch, or Alan Hoff!

 

N-17134 surfaced from CU021039, Caucasian and over 27 years of age.  Originally associated with Royce Carruth, a Navy pilot, but could not be confirmed. The only other likely candidate is Eric O’Briant. Fortunately, I was able to contact his nephew who is requesting disinterment and DNA testing.

 

N-17124 surfaced from CU494753, Caucasian, age 22-26. Only three are close . . . John Lush, Cordice Teague, and Alfred Ziegler.

 

N-17126 surfaced from CU519528, Caucasian, age 20+, no ID tags, but included flying suit. Closest matches are James Anderle, James Hughes, Richard Jackson, and Harold Podorson.  Unfortunately, I have no family contacts for these.

 

N-17143 surfaced from YC544593, Caucasian, age 30 plus, no ID tags or teeth, but included flying suit and parachute parts.  From the location, only one airman is a logical match . . . Bill Elsom.

 

N-17145 surfaced from YC564859, Caucasian, age 26-30, included flying vest. Robert Lacey and Ray Wilk are primary candidates.

 

N-17146 surfaced from YC564859, undetermined race, age 25-30, major trauma to remains, included a landing light switch. Only two come close . . . Robert Lacey and Ray Wilk. If anyone knows their family members, please contact me.

 

N-17147 surfaced from YC564859, undetermined race, age 24-27, included flying vest. These last 3 all came from the same location. Again Robert Lacey and Ray Wilk are prime for each . . . or anyone with an IQ above plants would deduct one of these is Lacey and another Wilk. The closest third loss would be Curtis Smith or Bill Elsom . . . both about 15 miles away.

 

N-17102 was found at YD364328. It was shipped as unknown but included AF flying suit, crash helmet, parachute line, and Mae West.  That narrows down to just 9 individuals, but it is doubtful that any of the families were told.

 

N-17104 surfaced from YD328567, Caucasian, age 25-30, no ID tags, but parts of a/c included.  Barney Casteel and Marlyn Ford are ideal candidates from location and age. Marlyn’s daughter has been notified.

 

N-17106 surface from YD284553, Caucasian, age 20-23, no ID tags, but included a/c parts. Four men fit this description . . . George Barbiere, Richard Caldwell, Dean Crabb, and Nicholas Palmiotti, yet Palmiotti is the only one for which I have a family contact.

 

Please note my frustration.  The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency calls me a “Hobbyist”. Well, if a Hobbyist can pull together this much information, just think what an agency with a 130 million dollar budget should do!!!!!

 

Please share this with other family members and encourage anyone and everyone to contact me at john.zimmerlee@gmail.com for more information on those missing from the Korean War.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 January, 2018 12:46
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Aldridge, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1413649/
uss-okl
ahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-aldridge-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Aldridge was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Aldridge. 

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Aldridge's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 January, 2018 12:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Morrissey, H.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Harry C. Morrissey, killed during World War II, has now

been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1413641/marine-

killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-morrissey-h/

 

On October 9, 1942, Morrissey was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th

Marines, 1st Marine Division, participating in a main offensive action in

the Battle of Guadalcanal.  After nearly two months of battle, the regiment

completed their action, during this battle Morrissey was killed in action.

Two other marines from Morrissey's battalion were interred in graves atop

Hill 73, alongside him.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Yorick Tokuru, Mr. John Innes, Mr. Ewan Stevenson

and the Solomon Islands government for their assistance in this recovery.

 

Morrissey's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with

the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Pfc. Eichelberger enlisted at a time the Army was segregated and he was assigned to the 92nd Infantry Division, which in 1944 and 1945 fought at the westernmost portion of the Allied line in northern Italy, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, an arm of the Defense Department.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 January, 2018 11:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Quintero, A.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Albert E. Quintero, missing from the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1412283/
soldier-missing-from-korean-war-accounted-for-quintero-a/

 

In late November 1950, Quintero was a member of Battery D, 15th

Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Self-propelled Battalion, 7th

Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers

assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed

east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by

overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces.  American forces withdrew south with

the Chinese continued to attack. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated

approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been

either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because Quintero could not be

accounted for by his unit after reaching Hagaru-ri, he was reported missing

in action on Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Quintero's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Courts of the

Missing in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along

with the other MIAs from the Korean War.  A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

 
Now his remains had been identified at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Lab at Offutt Air Force Base. “I was shocked and ... Fifty years later, a historian with the POW/MIA Accounting Agency studied the file and realized that the remains inside could probably be identified. In April, they were ...

...The body of Ludwig — known as “Louie” to friends and family — was recovered and buried beneath a white cross at Normandy American Cemetery. But no one ever found Julius, known as “Henry.” His body was lost with the ship, which sank to the bottom of the English Channel....

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency worked with his nephew who currently lives in Jefferson Township. Harold Hannon's remains will return to the Philadelphia airport on Wednesday afternoon and he will be laid to rest at Cathedral Cemetery on Saturday. "I never expected it. Not in my wildest ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Friday that the remains of a Waco serviceman recently accounted-for from World War II are going to be returned to his family for burial. Army Pfc. Lonnie B.C. Eichelberger, 20, of Waco, Texas, will be buried Jan. 10 in Houston. In February 1942 ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 January, 2018 08:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: CORRECTION: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement For Pennsylvania Marine Killed During World War II

 

--Please note the adjustement to include History Flight, Inc.'s involvment

in the recovery of Pfc. Hannon's remains.

 

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Harold P. Hannon, accounted for on October 4, 2017, will

be buried January 13, 2018, in his hometown.

 

Hannon, 28, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, was killed during the battle of

Tarawa in World War II.

 

His nephew, William Hannon, of Moscow, Pennsylvania, is available for

interviews at (570) 689-9238.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Hannon on file.

 

/////

In November 1943, Hannon was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Hannon died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted

remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Hannon's

remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to

the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification

in 1947.  By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in

the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu.

 

In July 2017, through a partnership with History Flight. Inc., DPAA used

various advanced investigative techniques and found the remains of men known

to have been buried on Tarawa.  The remains were accessioned into the

laboratory for identification.

              

To identify Hannon's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the History Flight, Inc. for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Hannon's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 January, 2018 14:51
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for Soldier Missing From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Lonnie B.C. Eichelberger, accounted for on May 5, 2017, will be

buried January 10, 2018, in Houston, Texas.

 

Eichelberger, 20, of Waco, Texas, was missing from World War II.

 

His nephew, Cheyenne Eichelberger, of Richmond, Texas, is available for

interviews at (361) 549-4876.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Eichelberger on file.

 

/////

 

In February 1942, Eichelberger was a member of Company I, 371st Infantry

Regiment,  92nd Infantry Division.  In an era of racial segregation, the

92nd ID was the only African-American division to fight in Europe.  The

division fought at the westernmost portion of the Allied line in northern

Italy from November 1944 until April 1945.  As part of Operation Fourth

Term, Eichelberger's regiment fought in the hills near the town of

Strettoia, Italy.  His regiment suffered heavy losses while attacking German

defenses.  Following the battle, Eichelberger could not be accounted for and

was declared missing in action.

 

In July and August 1945, during search and recovery operations, American

personnel recovered a set of remains, later designated as X-193, in the

vicinity of Strettoia, Italy.  Attempts to identify the remains were

unsuccessful and they were buried as "Unknown" at the United States

temporary military cemetery at Castelfiorentino.

 

On Sept. 14, 1948, Unknown X-193 was disinterred and transferred to the

Leghorn Port Morgue, where the remains were declared unidentifiable and

reinterred in Florence American Cemetery in April 1949.

 

Based on analysis of information associating X-193 with two individuals

still unaccounted for from the 92nd ID, the remains were disinterred from

the Florence American Cemetery on June 29, 2016.

 

To identify Eichelberger's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,964 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Eichelberger's name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Sicily-Rome American Ceremony, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
A POW/MIA flag waves during the closing ceremony for the POW/MIA 24-hour run at Schriever Air Force Base, Colo., Friday, Sept. ... It was developed by Kenneth Breaux and his team at the Houston-based M.I.A. Recovery Network, a nonprofit that advocates for missing-in-action servicemembers and ...

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 2 January, 2018 10:31
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Funeral Announcement for North Carolina Soldier Killed During Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Eugene J. Colley, accounted for on Dec. 12, 2016, will

be buried January 9, 2018 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,

D.C.

 

Colley, 48, of Edenton, North Carolina, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Colley on file.

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, Colley was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 2, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining

soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Following

the withdrawal, fighting continued.  Because Colley could not be accounted

for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action

as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Colley's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated

Americans were able to provide any information concerning Colley as a

prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army

declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

 

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted

operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County,

North Korea, based on information provided a Korean witness.  The site was

in the vicinity of Twikkae Village.  During the excavation, the recovery

team recovered possible human remains of at least five individuals.

 

To identify Colley's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y chromosome

(Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial

and anthropological evidence, which matched his records.

 

Today, 7,713 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains

that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by

American teams.  Colley's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an

American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the others who are

missing from the Korean War.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
A U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIA Affairs (USRJC) is making progress toward resolving unanswered questions on personnel missing and unaccounted-for from four separate wars. This positive development is evolving despite frayed nerves between these two nations over serious issues, ...
 
 
On the other hand, we're not proud of Gene Olson and members of the airport authority or their treatment of Vietnam veteran Gary Hall as well as their disdain for families of POW and MIA soldiers. Olson's letter last month referred to POW and Missing In Action soldiers as “outside groups” and the airport's ...

http://secure.campaigner.com/Campaigner/Public/t.show?5uqgo--30z0c-p0t8qg5&_v=2

American POWs in North Korea?
   Award-winning documentary reveals an      unprecedented American tragedy

Watch Online for FREE
 

 

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