rose.jpg (4818 bytes)

AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

red.gif (1122 bytes)

Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2018

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/28/2018
Pfc. Roger Gonzales U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/26/2018
Sgt. James K. Park U.S. Army Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division 11/23/1944 Germany 6/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr. U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Fireman 1st Class Lewis F. Tindall U.S. Naval Reserve USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/6/2018
Pfc. Paul D. Gilman U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/5/2018
Cpl. Morris Meshulam U.S. Army Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/4/2018
Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran U.S. Army Air Forces 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 2/25/1941 Slovenia 5/31/2018
Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 5/31/2018
Lt. Cmdr. Larry R. Kilpatrick U.S. Naval Reserve Attack Squadron One Hundred Five (VA-105) 6/18/1972 Vietnam 5/18/2018
Sgt. John W. Hall U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battlion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 5/16/2018
Ensign Harold P. DeMoss U.S. Naval Reserve Fighting Squadron 100 (VF-100) 6/23/1945 O'ahu Hawaii 5/11/2018
Cpl. DeMaret M. Kirtley U.S. Army Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 5/11/2018
Seaman 2nd Class William V. Campbell U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941   5/10/2018
Sgt. Melvin C. Anderson U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Cpl. Joseph Akers U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Shopfitter 3rd Class John M. Donald U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/8/2018
Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2018
Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/3/2018
Pfc. William F. Cavin U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 5/2/2018
Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/11/1945 Germany 4/27/2018
Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 4/27/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum U.S. Army Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/24/2018
Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/23/2018
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2018
Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte U.S. Army Air Forces 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force 8/1/1943 Romania 4/16/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/13/2018
Pfc. John H. Walker U.S. Arny Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry DIvision 11/24/1944 Germany 4/13/2018
Gunners Mate 3rd Class Marvin B. Adkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/11/2018
Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/10/2018
Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/9/2018
Sgt. Eugene W. Yost U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 9/3/1950 South Korea 4/9/2018
Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser U.S. Marine Corps Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 4/6/2018
Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan U.S. Army Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 4/3/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews U.S. Army Air Forces 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force 5/29/1943 France 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/26/2018
Capt. George Van Vleet U.S. Army Air Forces 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group 1/21/1944 Tarawa 3/22/2018
Sgt. Donald L. Baker U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/20/2018
Col. Peter J. Stewart U.S. Air Force Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing 3/15/1966 Vietnam 3/19/2018
Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/16/2018
Cpl. James I. Jubb U.S. Army Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/10/1950 South Korea 3/14/2018
Sgt. Julius E. McKinney U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 3/14/2018
Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz U.S. Army Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 9/28/1944 Netherlands 3/14/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2018
1st Lt. William W. Shank U.S. Army Air Forces 338th Fighter Squadron 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force 11/13/1943 Germany 3/6/2018
Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 5/30/1945 Japan 2/28/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 2/20/2018
Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile U.S. Army Comapny E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/20/2018
Pfc. Joe Lukie U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 2/16/2018
Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 2/14/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/13/2018
Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/8/2018
Pfc. David Baker U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/8/2018
Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 2/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Pfc. Jack H. Krieger U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/31/2018
Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/31/2018
Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/26/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon U.S. Army Gompany G, 8th Cavalry Regiment 9/5/1950 South Korea 1/19/2018
Pfc. Lamar E. Newman U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/27/1950 North Korea 1/19/2018
1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford U.S. Army Air Forces 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 12/17/1944 Croatia 1/19/2018
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018
Col. Edgar F. Davis U.S. Air Force 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing 9/17/1968 Laos 12/30/2017
List posted 06/30/18

 
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA, has announced that Staff Sgt. Rosenkrantz's remains have been identified and that he will be ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) finally laid to rest Tech Sgt. John F. Brady, Tech Sgt. Allen A. Chandler, 1st Lt. John H. Liekhus, ...
 
Citing practical difficulties, the official said 55 was a “ballpark” figure and that it would require further testing by the Defence POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
According to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the United States conducted 33 joint field activities in North Korea between 1996 ...
 
... but when he rose from his position, "enemy gunfire erupted and Rosenkrantz was killed," according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 July, 2018 10:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Ramos-Rivera, F.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for on July 12.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1576571/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-ramos-rivera-f/

 

In July 1950, Ramos-Rivera was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th

Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against North Korean forces near Taegon, South Korea. As U.S. forces

regrouped after their evacuation, Ramos-Rivera could not be accounted-for

and was declared missing in action on July 20, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in

this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ramos-Rivera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the

Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Ramos-Rivera's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000DtbXREAZ

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 July, 2018 09:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Chinn, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for on July 12.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1576456/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-chinn-l/

 

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent

Chinese attacks in North Korea. Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy

forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war

camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made

by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S.

service members in North Korea.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Chinn's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004lh3EAA

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 12:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Holliday, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday, killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on July 12, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1575652/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-holliday-d/

 

In November 1950, Holliday was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th

Cavalry Regiment, 7th Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

North Pyongan Province, North Korea. Holliday was killed in action on Nov.

30, 1950 and was reportedly buried in the United Nations Military Cemetery

(UNMC) Pyongyang. As the United Nations' situation with North Korea

worsened, circumstances forced UNMC Pyongyang on Dec. 3, 1950, and buried

remains could not be recovered.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Holliday's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Holliday's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004nSaEAI

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, accounted for on

February 12, will be buried July 21, in Inglewood, California.

 

Gibson, 20, of Winchester, Kansas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Thomas Clark, Jr., of Roseville, California, is available for

interviews at (916) 521-4305.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Gibson on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gibson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Gibson. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Gibson.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Gibson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA, as well as

anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Gibson's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Gibson's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XhCNEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:40
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Walter W. Green, accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will be buried

July 20 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Green, 18, of Zanesville, Ohio, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Green on file. 

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In November 1950, Green was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Unsan, North Korea.  Green was reported missing in action as of Nov. 2, 1950

when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

 

Following the war, during an operation known as "Operation Big Switch," when

prisoners of war were returned, returning Americans from Pyoktong Camp 5

reported that Green had been captured and died while at POW Camp 5.  Based

on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on June 30, 1951.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover

American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after

the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North

Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September

and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were

returned. However, Green's remains were not included and he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

In September 1954, a set of remains received from North Korea and reportedly

recovered from the Pyoktong Cemetery were returned and designated Evacuation

(Evac) N-14413 by the Central Identification Laboratory (CIU-Kokura).

However, the remains could not be identified and were interred as Unknown

X-14413 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

In November 1998, the Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii

recommended the disinterment of 15 unknowns, including X-14413.  The remains

were disinterred on January 31, 2001 and sent to the laboratory for

analysis.

 

To identify Green's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, laboratory

analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison,

as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,699 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Green's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the NMCP, along with other MIAs from the Korean War.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, accounted for on March 7, will be buried

July 20 in Riverside, California.

 

Rosenkrantz, 28, of Los Angeles, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Phillip Rosenkrantz, of Placentia, California, is available for

interviews at (714) 401-2715.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Rosenkrantz on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In September 1944, Rosenkrantz was a member of Company H, 504th Parachute

Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, participating in Operation Market

Garden, a ploy by Allied planners to break German defensive lines on the

western front by capturing a highway route through the Netherlands.  On

Sept. 28, 1944, Rosenkrantz' platoon occupied Heuvelhof, a farm, located

south of the town of Groesbeek.  German tanks and infantry launched a major

attack that morning.  The isolated paratroopers hid among sparse trees and

buildings.  As Rosenkrantz rose from his position, enemy gunfire erupted and

Rosenkrantz was killed.  Due to enemy fire and the proximity to enemy

troops, Rosenkrantz' remains could not be recovered. 

 

Between 1945 and 1952, Canadian, Dutch and American Graves Registration

teams were active in the area where Rosenkrantz died.  The Dutch team

recovered identification tags for Rosenkrantz, along with fragmentary

remains.  An American team, acting on the information provided by the Dutch,

followed up and found additional fragmentary remains, but the combined

remains discovered were too sparse to be identified.  Unbeknownst to those

teams, a Canadian team working in the area prior to their arrival had

already collected the remains of service members killed in this area.  As a

result of all of these activities, several sets of unidentifiable remains

recovered from the battlefields around Groesbeek were buried as unknowns in

American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) cemeteries in Europe.

 

After thorough research and historical analysis by DPAA. Aided by Dutch

researcher Mr. Ben Overhand and 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment historian

Mr. Frank Van Lunteren, one set of interred remains, X-1234 Margraten, was

circumstantially associated to the location of where Rosenkrantz was killed.

 

The remains, which were initially recovered by the 2nd Canadian Graves

Registration Unit, were buried at the Canadian Military Cemetery on June 22,

1945, and were listed as an American Soldier.   

 

On June 14, 2017, DPAA disinterred X-1234 from the Netherlands American

Cemetery.

 

To identify Rosenkrantz' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his

records; and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Overhand, Mr. Van Lunteren, the Royal Netherlands

Army's Recovery and Identification Unit and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war. Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Rosenkrantz' name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.       

 
In an interview with Reuters last week, an official with the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Washington never pays any foreign ...
 
 
No wonder the black POW/MIA flags still flutter. If silence is to still rule the day, then there is no means for truth to wend its way into our consciousness.
 
North Korea-US agree to excavate POW/MIA remains ... reinitiate the excavation of the remains of US POW/MIA that perished during the Korean War.
 
Some 5,300 are believed to be in North Korea, according to the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which tracks the remains of fallen ...
 
“It still will take us a number of years, assuming full access,” stated Kelly McKeague, Director of U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. “We've yet ...
 
To identify Green's remains, scientists from Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency accounted for Valley on Jan 11 through DNA, circumstantial evidence and dental and anthropological ...
 
Article 4 of the Trump-Kim agreement states that the U.S. and North Korea “commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate ...
 
That was when Solomon was identified by a scientist from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner system ...
 
South Korean military authorities also returned the remains of a US soldier unearthed in South Korea by way of the US Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
According to the website of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, North Korea has returned the remains of at least 3,200 Americans since the ...
 
“The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified,” the fourth ...
 

https://apnews.com/d70230c6c4164872b5c7cf3d801235bf/Shot-down-in-Germany,-veteran's-remains-returned-to-Idaho    07/13/18

MOSCOW, Idaho (AP) — Seventy-three years after his bomber was shot down over East Germany, Staff Sgt. Charles H. Daman has come home.

It was the spring of 1945 when 21-year-old Daman, a Plummer High School graduate, was killed in action after he and the crew of his B-24M Liberator were shot down over a field just north of Wittenberg, Germany....

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency “gives new meaning to no man left behind,” stated Patricia Farinacci, during a tribute to her uncle, Joseph ...

From: Cheryl Cerbone
Sent: 13 July, 2018 08:35
To:
Subject: Death of our National Commander

 

The Directors, Officers and members of the American Ex-Prisoners of War are saddened by the death of our National Commander Charles Susino, Jr. on Thursday, July 12, 2018 at his home in New Jersey.

As always, he was surrounded by his family and their love.

There will be a very simple one day service on Wednesday, July 18th,

2-6 pm at the Wright and Ford funeral home in Flemington, NJ.  At a later date, TBD, he will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Many of you know his love and passion for veterans, his fellow ex-Prisoners of War and his country.

 

If you wish to reach out to his family, please address cards to his son, Charles Anthony Susino, who will share them with his mother, Lillian, and his family.


Charles Anthony Susino

951 Gates Avenue

Piscataway, NJ  08854

charles.susino@gmail.com

 

We appreciate all the support we have received from the Veterans Service Officers through the years. Thank you.

 

 

 

 

Cheryl Cerbone, Editor

EX-POW Bulletin

23 Cove View Drive

South Yarmouth, MA  02664

 
She died before seeing the results, but in September of last year, Tanner received confirmation that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency had ...

From: Fowler, Michael G CIV DPAA EC (US)
Sent: 12 July, 2018 10:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Notes from DPAA Quarterly Family/VSO Update call

Dear Family Organizations, VSOs, and MSOs,

 We apologize for the delay in getting these notes out to you.   Please see
the attached.  They are also posted on our website at:
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1570677/defense-
powmia-accounting-agency-dpaa-quarterly-familyvsomso-call-notes/

 
... Washington found many sets of remains, which were sent to the US Defense POW (Prisoners of War)/MIA (Missing in Action) Accounting Agency in ...
 
 
... Washington found many sets of remains, which were sent to the U.S. Defense POW (Prisoners of War)/MIA (Missing in Action) Accounting Agency in ...
 
Thanks to the efforts of the newly created Defense POW/MIA agency, Johnson's remains, which had been interred in a grave containing dozens of ...
 
With working-level talks scheduled between North Korea and the US on July 12 for the return of the remains of US POW/MIA from the Korean War, the ...
 
"We have yet to see any specifics from that commitment," said McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).
 
 
However, Kelly McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which tracks the remains of fallen American soldiers ...
According to the Washington Post, Chuck Prichard, a spokesman for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, said that the US has sent North Korea ...

“We have yet to see any specifics from that commitment,” said McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Fortier <
bfortier@usamedia.tv>
Sent: Tue, Jul 10, 2018 7:48 am
Subject: POW/MIA Director Visiting Northeast Asia to Meet with Allies and Partners - Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

 

 

POW/MIA Director Visiting Northeast Asia to Meet with Allies and Partners

By DPAA Public Affairs

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1569768/powmia-director-visiting-northeast-asia-to-meet-with-allies-and-partners/

 

WASHINGTON, July 9, 2018 —Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Director Kelly McKeague is travelling to
 Northeast Asia July 8-18, 2018 to acknowledge the longstanding cooperation of the governments and peoples of Japan,  the Republic of Korea, and the People’s Republic of China in the search for America’s unaccounted-for personnel from past conflicts dating back to World War II.


“Our progress accounting for Department of Defense (DoD) personnel still missing from past wars has been significant,  but it would not be possible without the staunch support and strong collaboration of our host nation partners,” said McKeague.

McKeague stressed that the continued cooperation from Japan, South Korea, and China has been essential in providing the fullest possible accounting for DoD’s missing personnel to their families and the nation. He also said the good will generated in jointly pursuing the Agency’s humanitarian efforts in Northeast Asia has contributed to the respective bilateral relationships in each country.

McKeague will also discuss the development of joint initiatives to help accelerate the Agency’s overall efforts in Northeast Asia.

“We welcome and appreciate assistance from our host nation partners in developing new methods and approaches to increase and improve efforts to account for our service members who made the ultimate sacrifice and provide long-sought answers to their families,”  he said.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country,   visit the DPAA website at 
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

 

 
(Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP). This circa 1940s photo provided Tuesday, July 3, 2018, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
Re
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency say Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. He was wounded on Nov.
... and protracted fight to seize Rhine River crossings into Nazi Germany, according to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA (DPAA) Accounting Agency.

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) said August 30, 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a Joint U.S./ North Korean recovery ...

 

 
Goodwin's remains had been recovered in North Korea in 1998 and were identified last year by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).

 

 
For decades, his family and the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency worked hard to find his remains. Finally, in December 2017 his remains were ..

 

 
Information from the Defense POW MIA Accounting Agency shows 14-hundred Minnesota service members from World War II are still unaccounted for.

 
... T. Ton, Defense Attache of the US Embassy in Hanoi, representatives of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the US MIA Office in Hanoi.

 

 
Three years ago, officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began examining remains at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific ...

 

 
WASHINGTON — The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, ...

 

 
In 2015, members of the defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis. To identify Johnson's ...
 
Information from the Defense POW MIA Accounting Agency shows 1,400 Minnesota service members from World War II are still unaccounted for.
 
His remains were held at an American cemetery in France until they were eventually sent to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for analysis on ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 12:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Elmore, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

July 3, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1568522/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-elmore-j/

 

In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

McDowell could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in

action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the British government and military authorities, as well

as the Korean government for their partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Elmore's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 12:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Jenkins, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Willard Jenkins, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

July 3, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1568524/
soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-jenkins-w/

 

In September 1944, Jenkins was a member of Company C, 307th Airborne

Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division near Nijmegen,

Netherlands. On Sept. 20, 1944, while participating in Operation Market

Garden, the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) was ordered to cross the

Waal River to make an amphibious attack on the bridges. Using borrowed

British assault boats, members of the PIR crowded into boats with members of

Jenkins' battalion. According to historical reports, Jenkins operated the

rudder of one of the boats, and was wounded in the chest by fire, before

falling overboard. Because the area downstream of the river was controlled

by enemy forces, a search could not be conducted. Jenkins was declared

missing in action on Sept. 20, 1944.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission and the

government of the Netherlands for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Jenkins' name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Margraten, Netherlands, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although

interred as an "unknown", his grave was meticulously cared for over the past

70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 08:46
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Michigan Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, accounted for on January 11, will

be buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His brother, Robert Valley, of Gladstone, Michigan, is available for

interviews at (906) 280-9538.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Valley on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Valley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Valley. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Valley.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Valley's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA, as well as circumstantial evidence and dental and

anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Valley's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 08:53
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class James C. Solomon, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017,

will be buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Solomon, 23, of Forestburg, Texas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Harvey Seay, of Bowie, Texas, is available for interviews at

(940) 841-1420.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Solomon on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Solomon was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Solomon. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Solomon.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Solomon's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Solomon's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

Good Sunday Morning Veterans, Advocates, Patriots, Family and Friends of our Missing in Action and Former Prisoners of War!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgiohgqjB3Y

 

The National POW/MIA Recognition Day event, The RIDE HOME, is scheduled to kick off on September 20, 2018 and our base of operations this year will be Warner Robins Georgia. For over 15 years we have invited Former Prisoners of War and Families of those still Missing in Action so we may fulfill the Commander-in-Chief’s Proclamation:

 

“I call upon the people of the  United States to join me in honoring  and remembering all former American prisoners of war and those missing in action who valiantly served our great country.  I also call upon Federal, State, and local government officials and private organizations to observe this day  with appropriate ceremonies  and activities.”

 

Please check out the YOUTUBE link above, provided courtesy of Ann Wolf and then check out the event website - http://www.theridehome.com/home-1.html - on the main menu at the top of the page you will find the Hotels we have agreements with under Lodging - http://www.theridehome.com/lodging-2018.html - and you can see the proposed itinerary for the three day event here - http://www.theridehome.com/itinerary-2018.html -

 

Hero’s Banquet – Friday, 21 September requires a $25 donation per plate if you wish to break bread with our Honored Guest – information here - http://www.theridehome.com/banquet2018.html

All Services are open to the Public.

All escort Rides gathering points to the services will be announced on or about the 10th of September.

 

This is the Largest mutigenerational gathering of Former Prisoners of War and Families of Missing in Action in the country in response to the Presidential Proclamation, so come, be a part of History!

If you wish to Sponsor an Honored Guest, check out the attached Form.

 

Looking forward to see you in Georgia this September!

 

Until they all come home……….

 

moe

Chairman

The RIDE HOME, Inc.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 July, 2018 09:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, accounted for on March 5, will be

buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Shank, 24, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Mark Miller, is available for interviews at (504) 387-1092.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Shank on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank was a pilot with the 338th Fighter Squadron, 55th

Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force, flying

his P-38 on a mission to Bremen, Germany.  Shank was killed after engaging

in fierce enemy action.

 

In June 1948, the American Graves Registration Command recovered partial

remains from a P-38 crash site at Osteressen, Germany, however they were

declared unidentifiable, designated as X-7466 and buried as an Unknown at

Ardennes American Cemetery, Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium.

 

On May 29, 2008, historians from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC,

a predecessor to DPAA) met with a local German researcher, Mr. Werner

Oeltjebruns, who said he could identify Shank's crash site.  The team

visited the crash site in Osteressen, where material evidence of a crash

site remained. 

 

In 2016, a DPAA recovery team conducted an excavation of the Osteressen

site, where they recovered possible osseous material.  Simultaneously, after

thorough historical research and analysis, DPAA disinterred X-7466 from

Neuville.

 

To identify Shank's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well

anthropological analysis and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Oeltjebruns and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their assistance with this disinterment and recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Shank's name is recorded on the Walls of

the Missing at the Cambridge American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments

Commission in the United Kingdom, along with the others missing from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
But three years ago, personnel from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began examining remains at the National Memorial Cemetery of the ...
 
Trump-Kim Deal Raises Hopes for New MIA Recovery Bid ... North Korea since May 2005, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
Taylor's requests to the U.S. government for personnel files on the sailors caught the attention of officials at the Defense POW-MIA Accounting Agency ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Tuesday that Canty will be buried July 10 in Arlington National Ceremony with full military honors.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 3 July, 2018 10:34

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Connecticut Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, accounted for on Dec. 12, 2017, will be buried July 10, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Canty, 22, of Winstead, Connecticut, was killed during World War II.

 

His great nephew, Wayne Brazeau, Jr., is available for interviews at (773) 848-1702.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Canty on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On June 22, 1944, Canty was a member of the 555th Bombardment Squadron, 386th Bombardment Group, IX Bomber Command, aboard a B-26 Maurader on a nighttime bombing mission from Easton Lodge-Essex, England, against targets near Caen, France.  His B-26 was shot down between the villages of Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, France.  All eight crewmembers were killed in the incident.  Because the location of the crash was in German-held territory, U.S. forces were unable to make a detailed search for the crew at the time of their loss. 

 

Following the liberation of France, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who were killed in battle.  Residents of Gavrus recalled that a two-engine airplane crashed just outside the village on June 22, 1944.  An American was recovered and buried in a nearby British cemetery.  In 1945, the remains were exhumed and he was identified as an airman aboard the same aircraft as Canty.  However, no other remains were identified and Canty was declared non-recoverable.

 

In 1986, a French citizen located remains and personal effects recovered from a crash site near Gavrus.  The remains were handed to the Normandy American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, and were later identified as four individuals from the same aircraft as Canty.

 

In October 2014, Mr. Michael Jurd, a British researcher contacted U.S.

authorities that he found remains, as well as personal effects that corresponded to Canty, near Gavrus. 

 

In 2016, a DPAA investigation team surveyed the reported crash site and recommended it for excavation.

 

Between April and May 2017, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site between Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, locating possible remains and personal effects. 

 

To identify Canty's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French Government, Mr. Michael Jurd and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members (approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.  Canty's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Normandy American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 3 July, 2018 10:07
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Idaho Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Sgt. Charles H. Daman, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will

be buried July 11 in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

 

Daman, 21, of De Smet, Idaho, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Wilbur Tanner, of Moscow, Idaho, is available for interviews at

(208) 301-0007.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Daman on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe drew to a close, Allied forces

launched a series of aerial attacks to cripple what remained of the German

air force.  Daman, who was a member of the 714th Bombardment Squadron, 448th

Bombardment Group, 2nd Bombardment Division, was aboard an aircraft on an

attack mission on April 4, 1945, as one of more than 400 bombers to attack

airbases at Parchim, Perleberg and Wesendorf, Germany.  The aircraft, which

held 10 airmen, was attacked by enemy fighter planes in the vicinity of

Hamburg. 

 

Following the attack, the aircraft exploded and crashed, leaving only one

survivor, who was subsequently captured after he parachuted into the town of

Ludwigslust.  Personal effects of eight of the nine missing crewmembers were

found and identified by the surviving airman. 

 

On August 15, 1997, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA)

investigative team travelled to Ludwigslust to locate a possible crash site.

A local helped the team analyze a 1948 site sketch and align it with

present-day landmarks.  With this information, the team found aircraft

wreckage. 

 

In 2014 and 2015, multiple recovery teams excavated the site, finding

osseous material.  The remains were sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Daman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his

records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the German government and the staff of the Ludwigslust

Castle for their cooperation in this recovery mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Daman's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the other

MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
The Joint Recovery Team is made up of the Department of POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), East Carolina University Marine Archeology ...
 
 
"Recovery projects take many years to develop," said Lieutenant Dan Friedman, who led the project for the US Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
 
This circa 1940s photo provided Tuesday, July 3, 2018, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H.
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) has been helped by the French military divers to search the wrecks of downed fighter planes.

 
The Royal Canadian Air Force says the wing came from the 1956 crash of a Silver Star T-33 belonging to the 409 Squadron out of Cold Lake, Alta.
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, in 1998 a witness reported to a joint U.S./North Korean recovery team that human remains ...

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 12:31
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Elmore B. Goodwin, accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will

be buried July 9 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Goodwin, 25, of Norfolk, Virginia, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His nephew, Dr. Stefan C. Goodwin, of Baltimore, is available for interviews

at (410) 235-4985.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Goodwin on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Goodwin was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion,

24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Anju, North Korea.  Goodwin was reported missing in action on Nov. 27, 1950.

When no information regarding Goodwin was reported by returning American

POWs, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

 

On August 30, 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a Joint U.S./ North

Korean recovery team interviewed a witness who claimed to have found human

remains in a cornfield in Kujang District.  On Sept. 6, 1998, the remains

were repatriated to the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory in

Hawaii.

 

To identify Goodwin's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made

by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S.

service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,699 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Goodwin's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
Seventy-five years later, Joe's nephew Dennis Rislove was in Green Bay, Wis., and officials from the POW/MIA Accounting Agency were explaining the ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 08:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris, accounted for on April 23, will be buried July

9 in Dallas.

 

Farris, 19, of Dodson, Texas, was killed during World War II.

 

His sister, Judith Bingham, of Fredericksburg, Texas, is available for

interviews at (432) 230-5263.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Farris on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1944, Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th

Infantry Division.  Farris’ unit arrived in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany on

Nov. 9, 1944 and immediately began preparing to advance eastward to the town

of Grosshau.  Despite continued progress, the regiment’s Soldiers sustained

heavy losses due to enemy artillery fire.  On Nov. 28, 1944, Farris was

wounded by artillery and left the front line for the battalion aid station.

His regiment remained in combat for several more days, reaching the

outskirts of Gey, Germany, before being pulled off the front line.  When

officers took an accounting of the surviving Company B soldiers, Farris

could not be found.  The last any of the survivors knew was that he had

tried to find an aid station.  He was listed missing in action when he could

not be located. 

 

Due to a lack of new information, Farris was declared deceased as of Nov.

29, 1945.

 

Between 1946 and 1950, dozens of unidentified remains were recovered from

the Hürtgen Forest by various graves registration units.  In May 1946,

members of the 6890th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company of the

American Graves Registration Command, recovered an unburied set of remains

in a minefield near Gey, Germany.  The remains were designated as X-2762

Neuville and interred at United States Military Cemetery

Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium- present day Ardennes American Cemetery.

X-2762 was disinterred on Nov. 17, 1948 for reprocessing.  When an

identification could not be made, they were interred at Epinal American

Cemetery in France.  Because no remains had been associated with Farris, he

was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 8, 1950.

 

Following thorough scientific and historical analysis by DPAA historians,

X-2762 Neuville was disinterred from the Epinal American Cemetery on July

27, 2017 and sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Farris’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome

(Y-STR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological, and dental analysis, and

material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.
 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Farris’ name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten,

Netherlands, an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the

other MIAs from WWII.  Although interred as an "unknown" his grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle

Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 09:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Brown, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. Donald E. Brown, killed during World War II, killed during World

War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1565038/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-brown-d/

 

In July 1944, Brown was a member of Company A, 745th Tank Battalion,

fighting in support of the 1st Infantry Division in the European Theater, in

World War II.  Brown was killed in action on July 28, 1944, when his M-4

Sherman tank was destroyed by enemy fire near Cambernon, France. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

assistance in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Brown's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Brittany

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Saint

James, France, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as

an Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery, Brown's grave was meticulously

cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Mark Sauter <markasauter@gmail.com>
Sent: 1 July, 2018 20:12
To: Mark <markasauter@gmail.com>
Subject: Pls share: Best major media report ever on LKA US POWs & DPRK (Gordon Chang on Fox News)

 

 

http://video.foxnews.com/v/5804095133001/

 

Gordon is owed a great thanks for his forceful attention to this topic. I hope POTUS sees it, especially the color video of USAF Major Sam Logan in North Korean hands – they have never returned or accounted for him, along with so many others.

 

My only addition to Gordon’s great interview: At the end of the war, General Mark Clark, top commander of US/UN forces, did indeed publicly say the communists had kept US POWs. What was kept classified for decades was that a year AFTER the war, America’s top Air Force general asked the CIA to rescue American POWs still in enemy hands. See below.

 


Mark Sauter 202-701-9515

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 June, 2018 12:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, accounted for on January 30, will be

buried July 7, in Osage, Iowa.

 

Arickx, 22, of Mitchell, Iowa, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His family, Joan Lonergan, is available for interviews at 507-440-1856.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Arickx on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Arickx was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Arickx. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Arickx.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Arickx's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Arickx's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Arickx's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeK3EAK

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 June, 2018 12:03
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Camery, R)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 28, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1563838/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-camery-r/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Camery was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Camery.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Camery's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Camery's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKcEAK


 
"The grandson took us to the field," recalled Gregory Kupsky, a historian with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. "We had metal detectors and ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 June, 2018 08:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Louisiana Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. John W. Hall, accounted for on June 6, 2017, will be buried July 6

in Houston.

 

Hall, 23, of Jennings, Louisiana, was captured and killed during the Korean

War.

 

His niece, Deidra McKinnis, of Pflungerville, Texas, is available for

interviews at (512) 638-3264.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Hall on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Hall was a member of Headquarters Battery, 503rd

Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division.  On Nov. 29, 1950, Hall's

unit received orders to move from Kunu-ri to Sunchon, North Korea.  The

division received reports that the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF)

had set up fireblocks on several roads, including their planned withdrawal

route.  The division organized a movement into convoys, with Hall in the

eighth convoy.  Hall's battalion began their withdrawal through an area

known as "The Gauntlet."  Hall was reported missing in action on Dec. 1,

1950, in the vicinity of Somindong, North Korea.

 

Following the war, one returning American prisoner of war reported that Hall

had been captured and died on January 26, 1951 at Hofong Camp, or "Death

Valley," part of the Pukchin-Tarigol Camp Cluster.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American

remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war,

administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea

complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and

October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned.

However, Hall's remains were not included and he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (predecessor to

DPAA) and Korean People's Army (KPA) recovery team conducted the 37th Joint

Field Activity in Unsan County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea.

Remains were found in what was believed to have been a secondary burial

site, and were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in Honolulu for

analysis.

 

To identify Hall's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,699 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Hall's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
On Thursday, US Senator Todd Young (R-IN) met with Kelly McKeague, the Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). The two ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 June, 2018 20:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Gonzales, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales, killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for April 4, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1563344/
marine-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-gonzales-r/

 

In late November, 1950, Gonzales was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion,

7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division.  The U.S. X Corps began earnest

operations in the northeast of the Korean Peninsula against enemy units of

the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPFV), which were thought to be

soldiers of the Korean People's Army (KPA).  The X Corps began its

offensive, spearheaded by the 1st Marine Division and the U.S. Army's 31st

Regimental Combat Team, in the area of the Chosin Reservoir.  On Nov. 27,

1950, Gonzales' unit moved northwest from Hagru-ri to Fox Hill at the

Toktong Pass.  In the early hours of November 28, the CPVF attacked and

Gonzales' company sustained heavy casualties.  Gonzales was reported to have

been killed in action on Nov. 29, 1950, and was buried at the base of Fox

Hill.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Gonzales' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Gonzales' personnel file can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000001ZlGYEA0

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5896571/North-Koreans-digging-HOARDING-remains-American-soldiers.html
06/28/18

 

Many North Koreans believe they might get 'good money' for the remains of US soldiers killed during the Korean War between 1950 and 1953.

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), responsible for identifying and repatriating the bodies of fallen service members, has argued that ...
 
... soldiers against a number of federal agencies, including the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), the agency in charge of recovering and ...

 
Because two years ago, Rislove was contacted by the "Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency". “It was a government agency set up with the single ...

 

LifeZette    06/27/18

“The United States and the DPRK [Democratic People's Republic of Korea] commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate ...


 
The official Navy or Defense Department stance on Bibles being included in POW/MIA "Missing Man" table displays remains unclear. However, a ...

 

 
According to a report by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the recently recovered remains of a U.S. Marine from Somerville killed in World ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from the Korean War, are being ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, along with the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, used mitochondrial anthropological analysis to ...

 

 
The attack killed and injured more than 900 U.S. servicemembers, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency website. More than a dozen ...

 

moe note;

I get it, the American Cowboy does not like to be told what to do or that they are wrong but for the sake of ‘international face’ what would be the harm in picking up the remains and making the effort to identify them. If the Cowboy is right, he can sing his  ‘I Told YOU So’ song loud and long on the international radio but due to the stand the Cowboy has taken now, if anyone identifies these specific remains as American, there are NOT enough ladders on the earth to help Cowboy climb out of the ‘loss of integrity’ pit that he dug himself into.

For the sake of a Next of Kin family member somewhere on this earth, swallow the pride pill.

Humility beats arrogance in the public arena.

 
“The United States and the DPRK [Democratic People's Republic of Korea] commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate ...
Because two years ago, Rislove was contacted by the "Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency". “It was a government agency set up with the single ...

06/25/18   Here’s a follow-up to a report you made back in May:

https://www.wbir.com/mobile/article/news/local/military/service-sacrifice-arduous-hunt-for-lost-wwii-marine/51-566544121

(Via WBIR-TV)

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 25 June, 2018 10:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Guisinger, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr., killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on May 22, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1558701/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-guisinger-d/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Guisinger was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Guisinger.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Guisinger's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Guisinger's personnel profile can be seen at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeLSEA0

https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/23/asia/us-north-korea-kia-remains-intl/index.html

68 years after the Korean War, hundreds of US families are still searching for closure

Updated 8:15 PM ET, Sun June 24, 2018

 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Account Agency — a government organization tasked with recovering missing military personnel who are listed as ...
 
BOSTON — Five crewmembers from a B-17 bomber shot down during a mission over Germany in World War II are being buried together at Arlington ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the men will be buried with full military honors. They were identified as Tech. Sgt. John Brady, of ...
 
His remains were identified last year by the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. His nephew and next of kin, Gary Eakes of Tacoma, ...
 
 
A Seoul official said on Friday that officials from the Pentagon and the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency appear to be visiting North Korea, adding ...
 
[Photo courtesy of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency] ... Three crewmembers survived and were taken as prisoners of war, one who was killed ...
 
Johnny Husak and his siblings gave DNA samples in 2000 to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which linked their DNA to the unidentified ...
 
The agency that oversees POW/MIA issues has cited North Korean officials as saying they have as many as 200 sets of remains that have been ...
 
... a military review board declared that Mac Donald's remains were unrecoverable, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).
 
 
A statement from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says a set of unidentified remains were determined to be those of Mathews thanks to ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 7,697 Americans are unaccounted for from the 1950-1953 war. About 5,300 of those are believed to ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 22 June, 2018 09:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Park, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Sgt. James K. Park, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1557528/

\soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-park-j/

 

In November 1944, Park was a member of Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment,

1st Infantry Division, engaged in fierce fighting within the Hürtgen Forest

in Germany. Park was reported missing in action on Nov. 23, 1944, when he

was believed to have been wounded by shrapnel from a shell that struck a

tree above him. Due to continuous enemy fire, Soldiers from Park’s company

were prevented from searching for him. Additionally, no graves registration

teams reported finding his remains. Due to no information regarding his

whereabouts, his status was amended to deceased as of Nov. 24, 1945.

 

DPAA is grateful to American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership with this disinterment.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Park’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in Margraten,

along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown,

Park’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 
The U.S. Army and the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency saw that and asked the university's Family History Department to help identify some of ...
 
... Fort Logan National Cemetery after being positively identified in 2017 by the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, The Associated ...
 
Decades later, in 2015, former Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert Work directed the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to exhume the remains at ...
 
As she began researching the Piepers, Taylor found the brothers' surviving family through information obtained by the Defense POW/MIA Account ...
 
This combination of undated photos released Thursday, June 21, 2018, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows five U.S. Army Air Forces ...
 
 
A World War II airman from Taunton who was killed in 1944 is finally coming home. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said the remains of five ...
 
... Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. His remains were identified last year by the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 21 June, 2018 13:46
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Alabama Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews, accounted for on March 26, will

be buried June 28 in Pensacola, Florida.

 

Mathews, 25, of Andalusia, Alabama, was killed during World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Mathews on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

On May 29, 1943, Mathews was a member of the 422nd Bombardment Squadron,

305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force, participating in a strike

against the German submarine base at Saint-Nazaire, France.  The B-17

Mathews was aboard was hit by enemy fire as it left the target area.

Mathews did not make it out of the bomber before it crashed.  Survivors

believed the aircraft crashed approximately 150 kilometers from

Saint-Nazaire, near the French village of Quintin.  German reports indicated

one casualty was recovered from the wreckage of the plane, though no burial

information was provided.

 

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command

(AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. servicemen in Europe

as part of the global effort to identify and return fallen servicemen.

Remains that could not be identified were designated as unknowns and

interred in U.S. overseas cemeteries.  Beginning in 2010, DPAA and its

predecessors digitized and began to analyze more than 8,000 files for

Unknowns from WWII.

 

One set of unidentified remains, designated X-205 St. James, were

disinterred from a cemetery in St. Brieuc, France, prior to Sept. 16, 1944.

The remains could not be identified and were interred in the American

cemetery at St. James, present day Brittany American Cemetery.

 

In May 2015, a French researcher, Daniel Dahiot, provided DPAA with a page

from the St. Brieuc West Cemetery burial register, showing the names of

Americans who were interred there during World War II, including Mathews.

On April 4, 2017, following thorough historical research and analysis, by

DPAA analysts, of unit records and AGRS recovery reports, X-205 was

disinterred.

 

To identify Mathews' remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner

System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), anthropological analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Dahiot, the French government and the American

Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted

for from World War II.  Although interred as an "unknown" Mathews' grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle

Monuments Commission. Mathews' name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing

at the Cambridge American Cemetery in the United Kingdom, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

Subject: 2018 National POW/MIA Recognition Day Poster Unveiled - Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2018 11:46:17 -0400
From: moehog@verizon.net
To: moehog@verizon.net

 
 
Cpl. Joseph Robinson died a prisoner of war in North Korea in 1951. .... “There is a potential that even the returned POW/MIA's children may not be ...
 
 
"The POW/MIA issue is one very close to the hearts of Korean War Veterans," said Keep. "Their remains need to be located and returned to their ...
 
President Donald Trump says North Korea has returned the remains of 200 U.S. troops missing from the Korean War. Trump made the comment ...
 
 
There are 7,697 U.S. troops still unaccounted for from the war, and about 5,300 of those were lost in North Korea, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...
 
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used chest radiograph comparison, as well as dental and ...
 
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 21-year-old Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak of West was accounted for in February. His remains will ...
 
However, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency was able to tie the unidentified remains to Husak in 2016. They were sent to the agency's lab at ...
 
The agency that oversees POW/MIA issues has said North Korean officials have indicated that they have recovered as many as 200 sets of remains ...
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, 7,800 American service members remain unaccounted for from the Korean War, and about ...
 
The US Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency estimates that there are 7,697 Americans unaccounted for from the Korean War. Among those ...
 
(WJHG/WECP) - According to information from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), more than 400,000 ...
 
We applaud your commitment to restart the POW/MIA recovery effort and to finally provide closure for the families that have waited for so long. We are ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says 21-year-old Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak of West was accounted for in February. Burial will be ...
 
explains 1st Sgt. Kristen Duus with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Duus says Ludwig's remains were disinterred so that he and brother, ...
 
“The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified,” read the ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) estimates that there are 7,697 Americans unaccounted for from the Korean War. Of those ...
 
 
The Trump administration is expecting North Korea to return up to 200 sets of remains believed to be American service members who died during the ...
 
Richard Downes, executive director of the Coalition of Families of Korean & Cold War POW/MIAs, said he has since been told the North may have the ...
 
This undated photo provided by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows Navy Pharmacist's Mate 1st Class John Schoonover, of Port ...
 
This undated photo provided by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak of West, Texas. The remains of Husak, ...
 
... Department facilities in Hawaii and Nebraska to be tested to be identified, a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency spokesperson told the AP.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 19 June, 2018 08:08

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Wisconsin Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Pharmacist's Mate 1st Class John H. Schoonover, accounted for on Aug.

14, 2017, will be buried June 26 in Pensacola, Florida.

 

Schoonover, 39, of Port Edwards, Wisconsin, was killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His son, Robert Schoonover, of Panama City Beach, Florida, is available for

interviews at (850) 233-8947.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Schoonover on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Schoonover was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma,

which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Schoonover. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Schoonover.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Schoonover's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental

comparisons and anthropological analysis.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Schoonover's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

              

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced June 12, 2018 that the remains of Army Maj. Stephen T. Uurtamoa, pictured here and recently ...
 
He and the pilot, identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) as Lt. Vernal J. Bird, were aboard the plane on March 12, 1944, when ...
 
 
The goal was to secure a base for continued U.S. operations against Japanese forces in the central Pacific, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced June 12, 2018 that the remains of Uurtamo a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for ...
 
 
Sue MacPherson was at the state Capitol in 1973 when the Freedom Tree was planted in honor of her longtime friend from Butte, Capt. Robert Holton ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced that the remains of Army Air Forces Staff Sergeant Roy F. Davis of Peterborough, N.H., were ...
 
"We're standing by [but] we haven't officially been asked to do anything," Chuck Prichard, a spokesman for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
 
Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2013 for his bravery in Korea and could become a saint of the Catholic Church. He died in a North ...
 
The joint statement signed by Trump and Kim states, in part, "The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the ...
 
Bob Walker looks over the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's report ... John was not listed as a prisoner of war by German forces and the Army ...
About eight years after that, Elkin went to a Chicago hotel for one of the events the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency holds around the country in ...

 

In 2016, a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency team excavated the crash site and recovered additional remains that turned out to be Davis'. Genetic ...
 

 

... identified by the Department of Defense's POW/MIA Accounting Agency through chest radiograph comparison, circumstantial evidence and dental ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5852503/Remains-RAF-hero-shot-North-Korea-2011-turns-animal-bones.html

Remains of RAF hero shot down more than 65 years ago which were handed over to his family by North Korea in 2011 turns out to be animal bones

  • In 2011 it looked as if Flight Lieutenant Desmond Hinton was heading home
  • His brother had spent years persuading Pyongyang to hand over his remains
  • But what the world was never told was that subsequent DNA tests on the bones identified them as those of an animal

......In 2011, a casket was passed with great ceremony to the then British ambassador to North Korea.

But what the world was never told was that subsequent DNA tests on the bones identified them not as Flt Lieut Hinton's but those of an animal. 

While family members were informed, the media was kept in the dark for fear of damaging relations between North Korea and the UK.

The revelation appears in the memoirs of Thae Yong-Ho, a North Korean diplomat who defected to South Korea in 2016. It came as North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un agreed with US President Donald Trump at their Singapore summit that all remains of US servicemen who died in the Korean War would now be returned.......
 
... of exhaustion, dysentery and probably pneumonia," according to documentation from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency kept by Lou Martin.
 
BOSTON — A U.S. Marine from Massachusetts who died during the World War II Battle of Tarawa in November 1943 is coming home. The remains of ...
 
DNA, anthropological analysis and dental records helped identify the remains in February and the family was notified, the Defense POW/MIA ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 June, 2018 11:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Indiana Soldier Killed During Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. David Baker, accounted for on January 31, will be buried June 23

in Hobart, Indiana.

 

Baker, 18, of Gary, Indiana was captured and killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Angela Wilson, is available for interviews at (708) 203-4499.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Baker on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Baker was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th

Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, positioned in the vicinity of

Yongbyong, North Korea.  Baker's battalion moved north and lost contact with

two other regiments.  On Nov. 25, 1950, 3rd BN met with enemy resistance and

was attacked by Chinese People's Volunteer Force.  The battalion suffered

heavy casualties and Baker was declared missing in action as of Nov. 28,

1950, when he could not be accounted for by his unit.  Later reports

indicate that baker was likely captured by the enemy during battle.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American

remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war,

administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea

complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and

October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned.

However, Baker's remains were not included, and he was declared

non-recoverable. 

 

In December 1993, North Korea turned over 34 boxes of remains, which were

sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in Honolulu.  One box was

reportedly exhumed from Tongju-ri, a village near Prisoner of War Camp 5.

While no returning prisoners of war reported Baker as a prisoner, where the

remains were recovered indicated he had been captured.

 

To identify Baker's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial

evidence.

 

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Baker's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 June, 2018 11:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, accounted for on February 12, will be buried

June 23 in his hometown.

 

Husak, 21, of West, Texas, was killed during World War II.

 

His brother, John Husak, of Haughton, Louisiana, is available for interviews

at (318) 949-4853.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Husak on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In January 1945, Husak was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th

Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division, serving in the European theater.

Husak was killed during a combat patrol on Jan. 30, 1945 in Germany’s

Hürtgen Forest.  The offensive in the forest was one of the longest battles

the United States fought during World War II, lasting for nearly five

months. 

 

Due to the ongoing fighting, Husak’s remains were not recovered by members

of his unit during the battle.  After the war, the American Graves

Registration Command (AGRC) collected hundreds of unknown sets of remains

from battlefields in Germany, and labeled each set with an X-number.  One

set of remains, designated X-1043 Margraten, had been recovered from an area

in the Hürtgen Forest where Husak was believed to have been killed.  The

AGRC was unable to identify the remains and buried them at Margraten in June

1945 as an unknown. 

 

In March 1947, personnel from the AGRC reprocessed the remains but were

unable to associate the remains with any American service members.  They

were again reinterred in Margraten in July 1949.

 

In October 2016, DPAA researchers made a historical association between

X-1043 Margraten and Husak, based on the recovery site of the remains and

where he was killed.  On June 13, 2017, the remains were disinterred and

repatriated to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.

 

To identify Husak’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which

matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Husak’s name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing, the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium.  Although interred as an

"unknown,” Husak’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years

by the American Battle Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 June, 2018 10:07
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Massachusetts Marine Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Pfc. John W. Mac Donald, accounted for on Aug. 15, 2016, will be

buried June 22 in Bourne, Massachusetts.

 

Mac Donald, 19, of Somerville, Massachusetts, was killed during the battle

of Tarawa in World War II.

 

His cousin, Sharon N. Kelley, of Canton, Massachusetts, is available for

interviews at (781) 562-1241.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Mac Donald on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Mac Donald was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Mac Donald died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Mac

Donald's remains were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review

board declared Mac Donald remains non-recoverable.

 

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified

DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the

remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the

battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

 

To identify Mac Donald's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory

analysis, including anthropological analysis and dental and chest radiograph

comparison analysis, which matched Mac Donald's records; as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for their partnership in this

recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Mac Donald's name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or

lost in WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
... according to a news release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which aims to account for servicemen who went missing in war.
 
 
According to a press release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Leroy's remains were recovered from North Korea in 1954 and after ...
 
Researchers at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency have conducted interviews, pored over old maps and scrutinized battle reports to narrow ...
 
"If it's not our son, if it's not our daughter, or our neighbors or relatives, do we care?” said Bob Jones, vice president of the Northeast POW/MIA Network.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced the remains of Army Pfc. Felipe A. Champion of Brownsville will be buried in his hometown ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 June, 2018 11:44
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Felipe A. Champion, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, will be buried

June 21 in his hometown.

 

Champion, 19, of Brownsville, Texas, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Lupita Vera, is available for interviews at (956) 459-7967.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Champion on file.

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

On Feb. 12, 1951, Champion was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 38th

Infantry Regiment, when he was reported missing in action following a battle

with the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the

Central Corridor, South Korea.  After CPVF units withdrew north beyond

Hongch'on in early March, American units began moving forward and found war

dead, however Champion's remains could not be identified.

 

A list provided by the CPVF and Korean People's Army (KPA) listed Champion

as a prisoner of war, and a returning American prisoner of war reported that

Champion died while in custody at the Suan Bean Camp prisoner of war camp in

1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on May

3. 1951.              

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover

American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after

the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North

Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September

and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were

returned. However, Champion's remains were not included and he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered

during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of

at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war.  On May 28, 1992,

North Korea returned 15 boxes of remains reportedly to have been recovered

from where Champion was believed to have died.

 

To identify Champion's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis,

anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Champion's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

site along with the other MIAs from the Korean War.  A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 June, 2018 10:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Storekeeper 3rd Class Wallace E. Eakes, accounted for on Sept. 27,

2017, will be buried June 21 in Denver, Colorado.

 

Eakes, 22, of Caney, Kansas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Gary Eakes, of Tacoma, Washington, is available for interviews

at (253) 255-8087.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Eakes was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Eakes. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Eakes.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Eakes' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Eakes' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

The men were either taken prisoner of war, confirmed killed or declared ... SOURCES: The Korean War Project, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
 
The Defense POW-MIA Accounting Agency says 20-year-old Army Private First Class John H. Walker will be returned to his family and laid to rest June ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on Thursday announced the remains of Army Pfc. Felipe A. Champion of Brownsville will be buried June ...
 
The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified. Given the ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Wednesday that the remains of U.S. Army Pfc. John Walker will be buried June 20 in his hometown of ...
 
 
... 27 April); and an agreement to “recovering POW/MIA remains [from the Korean War], including the immediate repatriation of those already identified.
 
 
Finally, the fourth point, the United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, meaning war dead from the Korean War, including ...
 
The joint declaration signed by President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un included a commitment to “recovering POW/MIA ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 13 June, 2018 07:08
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa Soldier Accounted-For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. John H. Walker, accounted for on April 11, will be buried June 20

in his hometown.

 

Walker, 20, of Morning Sun, Iowa, was killed during World War II.

 

His brother, Robert Walker, of Midlothian, Texas, is available for

interviews at (972) 723-2135.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Walker on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Nov. 24, 1944, Walker was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th

Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in

action after his unit engaged in fierce fighting on Hill 207 near Schönthal,

Germany in the Hürtgen Forest.  With no evidence that Walker had been

captured or survived combat, his status was changed to deceased on Nov. 25,

1945.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) collected

thousands of unknown sets of remains from battlefields in Germany, and

labeled each set with an X-number. 

 

In November 1948, German resident Mr. Bernhard Kueppers found remains in the

woods at the northern edge of the Hürtgen Forest near Langerwehe, Germany,

and notified AGRC personnel, who recovered them the following month.  The

remains were processed at the Central Identification Point in Neuville

Belgium, and designated X-7980 Neuville.  In September 1949, the remains

were declared unidentifiable and were interred at the Ardennes American

Cemetery in Neuville, France.

 

In April 1949, with no association between Walker and X-7980 Neuville, an

AGRC investigator traveled to Schönthal to investigate the loss of Walker,

however no remains could be located.  On Dec. 15, 1950, having received no

further evidence that could lead to the recovery of Walker, he was declared

non-recoverable. 

 

In 2016, a historian from DPAA conducted a study of unresolved American

losses in the northern part of the Hürtgen Forest.  Careful analysis of AGRC

records and unit combat reports indicated a strong association between

X-7980 and Walker. 

 

Based off of that research, and a thorough scientific review of the

biological and dental records, the DPAA and the American Battle Monuments

Commission exhumed X-7980 in June 2017 and transferred the remains to DPAA.

 

To identify Walker’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, as well as dental and anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Kueppers and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership with this disinterment and recovery. 

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Walker’s name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission in Margraten, along with the others missing from WWII.

Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Walker’s

grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, at least 556 Pennsylvanians remain missing on the Korean peninsula — more than 20 had ...
 
 
Most of the missing Americans died in major battles or as prisoners of war, according to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
"The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified," the ...
 
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 June, 2018 08:54
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas Soldier Accounted-For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, accounted for on Jan. 25, 2018, will be buried

June 19 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

 

Baker, 20, of Thornton, Arkansas, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Kaggie Baker, of Cedar Rapids, is available for interviews at

(319) 320-6810.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Baker on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In September 1950, Baker was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th

Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.  He was reported missing in

action on Sept. 6, 1950, as a result of fighting that occurred between his

unit and enemy forces near Haman, South Korea.

 

Following the battle, the  U.S. Army Graves Registration Services (AGRS)

created Field Search Cases (FSCs) to track unaccounted-for service members,

assigning Baker to FSC 182-F.  AGRS teams searched battlefields for remains

and interred recovered remains at temporary cemeteries in South Korea.  FSC

182-F contained 34 associated individuals who corresponded to Baker's unit.

Because of the lack of evidence to verify identity, some of the remains

recovered in late September 1950 were buried as "Unknowns."

 

On January 6, 1951, a set of unidentified remains recovered southwest of

Haman, labeled as "Unknown X-209 Masan," were interred at United Nations

Military Cemetery (UNMC) in Masan, South Korea.

 

In January 1955, the remains were declared to be unidentifiable and were

transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery in the Pacific (NMCP) in

Honolulu, known as the Punchbowl.

 

In 2016, based on research regarding two individuals who remained

unaccounted-for from FSC182-F, analysts from DPAA determined that Unknown

X-209 could be associated with one of the missing Soldiers from FSC 182-F.

DPAA disinterred Unknown X-209 on Oct. 30, 2017 and sent the remains to the

laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Baker's remains, scientists from DPAA used chest radiograph

comparison, which matched his records, as well as dental and anthropological

analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Baker's

name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 June, 2018 11:00
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Illinois Soldier Accounted-For From Korean War To Be Buried With
Full Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Army Maj. Stephen T. Uurtamo, accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be
buried June 19 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

Uurtamo, 32, of Chicago, was killed during the Korean War.

His daughter, Carol Elkin, also of Chicago, is available for interviews at
(773) 575-4774.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Uurtamo on file.

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National
Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

//////

In late November 1950, Uurtamo was a member of Headquarters Battery, 82nd
Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division,
which was engaged in persistent attacks with the Chinese People's Volunteer
Forces (CPVF) near the Ch'ongch'on River in North Korea.  On Nov. 30, 1950,
the Division began to withdraw south along the Main Supply Route, known as
"The Gauntlet."  During the withdrawal, the 82nd lost many Soldiers, one of
whom was Uurtamo who was declared missing in action as of Dec. 1, 1950, when
he could not be accounted for.

Following the war, several returning American prisoners of war reported that
Uurtamo had been captured and died at the prisoner of war transient camp,
known as Hofong Camp, in North Korea in January 1951.  Based on this
information, the U.S. Army declared Uurtamo deceased on Jan. 21, 1951.

In April 2005, a joint U.S./Korean People's Army Recovery team recovered 32
sets of remains from a site south of Unsan, North Korea.  Based on the
recovered material evidence and surrounding conditions, it was determined
this was a secondary burial site. 

To identify Uurtamo's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and
autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as
circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.  Uurtamo's name is recorded on the Courts
of the Missing at the National Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, with the
others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to
his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 June, 2018 12:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: South Dakota Sailor Accounted-For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Reserve Radioman 2nd Class Julius H.O. Pieper, accounted for on Nov.

15, 2017, will be buried June 19 at the Normandy American Cemetery in

Colleville-sur-Mer, France.

 

Pieper, of Esmond, South Dakota, was killed during World War II.

 

Pieper will be buried next to his twin brother, Radioman 2nd Class Ludwig J.

Pieper, who was killed in the same attack.

 

His niece, Linda G. Pieper Suitor, of Green Valley, Arizona, is available

for interviews at (520) 834-6488.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Pieper on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On June 19, 1944, Pieper was a member of Landing Ship Tank Number 523

(LST-523), off the coast of Normandy, France.  The ship exploded and sank

after striking an underwater mine, killing Pieper.  In the years following

the incident, his remains were not recovered or identified.  Pieper's twin

brother, Radioman 2nd Class Ludwig J. Pieper, was also killed in the attack,

but his remains were recovered after the incident and buried at the Normandy

American Cemetery in France. Julius will be buried next to his brother.   

 

Recently discovered records show that in September 1961, French salvage

divers dismantled the LST-523 and turned over potential remains discovered

to U.S. authorities.  The remains, designated as Unknown X-9352, were found

in the Radio Room of LST-523.

 

The remains could not be identified and were interred in Ardennes American

Cemetery in Belgium as an Unknown. 

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-9352 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, on April 11,

2017, Unknown X-9352 was disinterred from Ardennes American Cemetery and

sent to DPAA.

 

To identify Pieper's remains, DPAA used laboratory analysis, including

dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French salvage divers and the American Battle

Monuments Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted

for from World War II.  Pieper's name is recorded on the Walls of the

Missing at the Normandy American Cemetery in France, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site. Although interred as an "Unknown" in Ardennes

American Cemetery, Pieper's grave was meticulously cared for over the past

70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission.  A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: markasauter@gmail.com <markasauter@gmail.com>
Sent: 12 June, 2018 15:15
To:
Subject: surprise from the well-known intelligence reporter (and longtime digger on the POW issue) Bill Gertz at the Free Beacon.

 

This is from a note I sent him weeks ago, but he was on top of it after the results of the summit. M

 

The joint statement also said North Korea and the United States "commit" to recovering remains of prisoners of war and missing in action including the immediate return of those already identified.

POW activists have said North Korea has not accounted for Americans held by North Korea since the 1950s.

"A critical issue between America and North Korea that has received scant media attention involves the fate of Americans last known alive in North Korean hands and never returned at the end of the Korean War, along with those reported shipped during the war to North Korean allies the Soviet Union and China, as well as U.S. POWs reportedly sent from Vietnam to North Korea, which flew jets against American aviators over the skies of its North Vietnamese ally during the Vietnam War," said Mark Sauter, a noted researcher and activist.

http://freebeacon.com/national-security/no-breakthrough-summit-trump-kim/

 
A fact sheet prepared by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) details the locations of former prison camps and other sites, as well as the ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced Tuesday that the remains of Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, 20, of Thornton (Calhoun ...
 
“The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified,” reads ...

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: President Trump, North Korea, the Media & US POWs Last Known Alive But Not Returned
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 14:41:23 -0400
From: markasauter@gmail.com

 

Some of you asked me about the Trump/Kim summit and agreement (see the portion of the agreement about POW/MIA below)

 

 

  • The summit apparently went as we anticipated: President Trump and his team asked only about remains and therefore only got a commitment to recover remains, including the “immediate repatriation of those already identified” (IMO, those the North Koreans have been holding in their warehouse/s to sell back to us)  -- the efforts of the family groups to reach POTUS on the unrepatriated POW issue seems to have failed.
  • Let’s hope the North Koreans keep their word on the remains, which would be great. However, while the recovery of the remains of our heroes is critical, it is not sufficient when we know Pyongyang can account for many Americans last known alive in their hands but never returned. In addition, what nobody talks about is that even if Pyongyang returned 1,000 remains this year, the Pentagon – unless things change dramatically – would take decades to identify them.
  • I listened to the President’s entire press conference. He mentioned remains several times, but never mentioned unrepatriated POWs and, as far as I can recall, never mentioned accounting for the missing (eg, men for whom there are no remains). He did mention Japanese abductees.
  • I imagine this will turn out to be great news for the North Koreans, as there is a good chance we will in effect pay them for the remains, as we have in the past, and there is no sign the President (who probably still doesn’t even realize that Americans were known alive by name, even after the Armistice, and not returned; were shipped to other countries; were reported alive in North Korea decades after the war) has or will raise such issues, and DPAA does not appear to be pushing him on it. IMO, and as many of your family members will agree, the DPAA only wants to deal with the remains issue. As a reminder of one example DPAA almost certainly never told the President about: Gilbert Ashley and four other US aviators confirmed by US intelligence alive and in North Korean hands after the Armistice was signed, but never returned or accounted for by Pyongyang: http://www.kpows.com/confirmedalivetheashleyfive.html Or men such as Major Sam Logan, seen here in color film in North Korean captivity https://youtu.be/CLkj2gs45r8 and his post-capture picture sent round the world by the Soviet news agency, but again never returned or accounted for…
  • Aside from Fox, no major media outlets, as far as I’m aware, have covered the issue of unrepatriated POWs (versus remains) as important to US/North Korea relations. Many if not most have done stories on: Korean-American families in the US who hope to learn what happened to their relatives in North Korea; Japanese abductees; and human rights in North Korea. These are all important stories, but I emailed several people at the Washington Post and asked why they didn’t have room to write about not just Koreans and Japanese last known alive in North Korea, but also American servicemen. I included much of our data, pictures and declassified documents. Not one replied. These gatekeepers are a major reason the White House and American people hear about Japanese abductees but not last known alive Americans in North Korea. The reporters asked POTUS many questions about these topics, but none about Americans last known alive in North Korean hands or the multiple reports of surviving US prisoners in North Korea decades after the war.

 

Bottom line: the North Korean POW/MIA issue has now essentially been defined forever by the President and media as only involving remains, unless something changes.

 

Having studied this issue and its history for 30 years now, I am reminded of the family movement right after the Korean War to gain a full accounting (there were even protests outside the White House.) Back then the families did not have access to the now declassified records we have showing extensive evidence that many US POWs had been retained by the North Koreas, Chinese and Soviets. The families suspected this was all true – and the commander of UN/US forces during the Korean War had stated it publicly -- but the US government denied in public what its own generals and intel analysts were saying behind closed doors. Back in the mid- and late-1950s, the families lost their fight. Yesterday was the biggest opportunity since then to obtain the truth, and once again the opportunity seems to have been lost.

 

 

1.       “The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified.”

Mark

www.powinvestigativeproject.org

PS What to do politically? As an investigative historian, this is not my role. But IMO unless POW/MIA families get in front of the President and perhaps other decision makers (via Hannity? Fox and Friends? A major media and oped push by family groups on the theme that “remains are critical but not enough?” A meeting with President Trump and the family groups arranged by a group of Senators? etc), the DPAA policy will have prevailed and there will never be any real pressure on Pyongyang to account for those last known alive.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 June, 2018 07:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Meshulam, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Morris Meshulam, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

on June 4, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1547691/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-meshulam-m/

 

In late November 1950, Meshulam was a member of Battery D, 82nd

Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons,) 2nd Infantry

Division. The Division suffered heavy losses to units of the Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) between the towns of Kunu-ri and Sunchon,

North Korea. Meshulam was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Meshulam's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.


 
The two sides “commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified,” read the document, which ...

 
According to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, most of the missing Americans died in major battles or as prisoners of war. Others ...
 
 
https://www.newsmax.com/politics/veterans-group-trump-north-korea/2018/06/11/id/865428/

Over 7,000 American service members from the Korean War remain unaccounted for, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
 
https://www.military.com/daily-news/2018/06/11/vets-call-full-accounting-korea-war-missing-trump-kim-summit.html

The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday that the remains of Marine Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn had been positively identified ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 June, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Tindall, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Reserve Fireman 1st Class Lewis F. Tindall, killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1546358/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-tindall-l/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tindall was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Tindall.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Tindall's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 June, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Gilman, P.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Paul D. Gilman, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on May 17, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1546351/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-gilman-p/

 

In November 1943, Gilman was assigned to Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Gilman died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Gilman's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 June, 2018 08:36
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Harris, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Charles H. Harris, killed during the

attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on April 26,

2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1546360/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-harris-c/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Harris was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Harris.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Harris' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 
 
The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Navy Seaman 1st Class Edward Slapikas was buried in his hometown on Saturday ...
 
On May 22, Duran's family was informed by the Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency that his remains had been identified. He will soon ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced earlier this week that Heilman's remains are being returned to his family for burial with full ...
 
Fast forward to May 2017, when the Defense Department's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) partnered with the nonprofit History Flight ...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5822471/Russian-museum-discovers-secret-2014-order-destroy-data-gulag-system.html  06/08/18
 

 

Up to 17 million people were sent to the Gulag, the notorious Soviet prison camp system, in the 1930s and 1940s, and at least 5 million of them were convicted on false testimony.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

National Alliance of Families, April 9, 2005:
 

Information recently provided, by former DPMO Intelligence Research Officer Warren Gray, details a string of failures within DPMO to actively pursue information relating to our POW/MIAs. One of his many concerns was the DPMO failure to investigate a report, known in house, as the “185 Report.”  Could the 185 POWs referred to in this report be the “small number” of POWs mentioned in the conclusion of the Senate Select Committee’s 1993 Report?  We don’t know because DPMO buried the report.
With the recent release of the 5th  Edition of the Gulag Study, this legislation has never been more important.
According to the study;  “Americans, including American servicemen, were imprisoned in the former Soviet Union . . .  "

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Volume III, Number 2                        February 1993

 

This information service is designed to help President Clinton's appointees understand that there are unresolved problems of Americans who were captured alive (POWs) but not released. THE INSIDER is published by a group of current and former intelligence officer who formed in 1981 to look for evidence that would prove, that not all captured U.S. POWs were released at the end of war. What happened to them?

 

                   "The Soviet Connection"

 

   On December 30, 1992 the Washington Times newspaper reported on a State Department cable, dated December 10, 1992, that had been leaked to them. In the cable there was some discussion about the possibility that the Moscow office of the Joint-Russian and American Commission on POWs (prisoners-of-war), which was just set up this last summer, may stop functioning. The cable sited the hostile environment in Moscow by some Soviet counter-parts who were slowing the inquire and there was a feeling that U.S. investigators were not looking for live American prisoners.

 

   It would be a grave and serious mistake to stop looking for Americans who are missing in the former Soviet Union just after the investigation started. Boris Yeltsin, the President of Russia has offered a once in a life time opportunity to try to chase down leads on last known alive Americans who were in Soviet hands on June 12, 1992. On the journey to find out what happened to captured Americans the United States should leave no stone unturned.

 

   To illustrate the usefulness of collection and analysis from completely open source material on the "Soviet Connection" to our missing prisoners, I submit the following review and analysis of facts I have collected while writing a book called "The Missing Prisoners".

 

   As a serious student of the "Soviet Connection" to our missing prisoners (POWs), I have spent the last 10 years researching Soviet and U.S. archives for hard copy documents, reviewing cable traffic sent to and coming out of the U.S. Moscow Embassy, interviewing former prisoners of the Soviet prison system and looking through newly released Soviet records, given freely by the Soviets to the U.S. National Archives. I have meet in Russia with sources who have located Soviet military officers who were involved in the transfer process, that brought captured American prisoners and military equipment to the Russia during and after the Korean War. The Russian military has admitted their role as interrogators of captured Americans in Korea and Vietnam. With the change in leadership in the former Soviet Union, access to records has begun to become more open and U.S. efforts to gain access to these records should not be curtailed or halted while the opportunity presents itself.

 

   Everything I have uncovered in my research supports the conclusion that the Soviets imprisoned Americans from the early 1920's to current times. On August 20, 1921 Dr. Weston B. Estes was released, along with 5 other Americans who were arrested and imprisoned, for 8 months in No.2 Lubiaka prison. Victor Herman, an American, was thrown into a Russian prison in July 1936, for what Soviet authorities called counter- revolutionary activity.  Victor was finally freed in 1976.

 

   One of the Soviets reasons for taking American prisoners was to obtain their "military value" knowledge or other information. The Soviets routinely shot down American aircraft to capture American technicians to squeeze them for their knowledge of America's advanced technology. Moscow is preparing to turn over the remains of Capt. John R. Dunham who was shot down on October

7, 1952 in a B-29 bomber that disappeared over northern Japan after being hit by Soviet fire. A crew of 8 Americans went missing during on this reconnaissance mission. The Soviets also say they have located the remains of Maj. Eugene E. Posa, shot downed on July 1, 1960 in an RB-47, during an electronic reconnaissance mission over the Barents Sea near the Kola Peninsula. Four of the six man crew on board were killed in the shoot down according to U.S. records. Although the former Soviet Union had denied that they captured or held American prisoners from any shot down during the cold war, the surfacing of these two U.S. Air Force specialists indicates that

these Americans fell into Soviet hands. Clearly, some American prisoners were captured and most likely subjecting to interrogation.

 

   The Soviets know much more than what has already been surfaced publicly. On April 8, 1950 a U.S. Navy PB4Y-2 was fired upon as it was near Libau, Latvia and disappeared over the Baltic Sea. On April 25, 1950 a Swedish fishing vessel recovered parts of the missing aircraft 37 miles west of Libau, Latvia. In September 1950 a U.S. citizen John Noble arrived in a Soviet prison camp called Vorkuta where he spoke to another prisoner, a Yogoslavian national who said he had seen and spoken to American flyers who were shot down over the Baltic Sea. He learned that eight of the crew of ten had survived the shot down. Another American imprisoned in Vorkuta, Pvt. William T. Marchuk spoke to a Russian prisoner who claimed to have been with the Soviet fleet that helped rescue the American flyers. The Soviets have always denied that these Americans were captured, who had special talents (electronic intelligence collection skills).

 

   The Soviets kidnapped American's they wanted. Some from West Germany, and some with special knowledge. Pvt. William T. Marchuk and Pvt. William A. Verdine were released by the Soviets on January 6, 1955 along with John Noble. Private Marchuk was kidnapped on February 1, 1949 in Germany and Private Verdine was kidnaped on February 3, 1949 from Germany. Noble, a civilian, was taken by the Soviets from his home in Dresden, Germany on July 5, 1545. Alexander Dolgun, who worked for the U.S. Embassy in Moscow was

kidnapped in 1948 and not freed until 1971. Charles Clifford Brown, an American was reported by a released Italian prisoner who reported the American engineer in Moscow's Lefortskaya prison in January 1948. Clifford Brown was reported alive in Verkhni, Uralsk in November 1953 by Austrian prisoners who were released in June 1955. The Joint Russian-American search has located and released Soviet prison records that indicate that Brown was shot as a spy.

 

     Intelligence officers may believe that there is only a paper trail left behind in Russia that tells what happened to Americans who fell into Soviet hands. The President of Russia however is clearly talked, on June 12, 1992, about Live Americans still on Soviet soil. On November 18, 1992, four Americans, trapped on Soviet soil after World War II, were found alive living in western Ukraine. Bogdan Karishin, Emiliya Shakhrai, Margaret Krivenko and Mikhail Semko were all trapped in 1945 in the Soviet Union and were not allowed to leave.

 

   Adding to the mountain of evidence, that can not be ignored, that points to the facts that some Americans were held as prisoners on Soviet soil, on September 11, 1992, ABC's 20/20 aired a program in which their cameraman strolled into a Russian cemetery near one of the old gulag (prisons) and  found the graves along with supporting documents that five American prisoners-of-war captured during WWII, were buried there. Three of the five Americans have been identified, publicly. All were Americans who were registered in German prison record books as having been held as POWs in WWII (Army Cpl. Lyle Timmerman was in Stalag 3C; Sgt Ted Yates was in Stalag 3C; and, Pvt. R. Larson was in Stalag 3A). Stalag 3C and Stalag 3A were German prisoner-of-war camps that were overrun by the Soviet Army. These three Americans, were clearly, moved to the Soviet Union, where they died and were buried in a Soviet cemetery.

 

   In a new book released in the fall of 1992 called "Soldiers of Misfortune" on page 279 the authors paint the picture that the Soviets did

not return all of the American prisoners they "liberated" from German POW camps:

 

      German Prison      American held     Americans released

        1. Stalag 4G       7,076               520

        2. Stalag 3A       4,894             1,115

        3. Stalag 2D       6,894               258

        4. Stalag 2B       7,087             5,782

        5. Stalag 2A       3,700             2,395

        6. Stalag 3C       2,100             1,420

             TOTAL        31,751            11,490

 

   Thus, the research of Col. James D. Sanders, Mark A. Sauter, & R. Cort Kirkwood showed that 20,261 (31,751-11490) Americans were taken from German POW camps and shipped back to the Soviet Union, were not all released or accounted for.

 

   I set out to set up a private back channel in Russia in 1990 and 1991 to assess how willing and open the Soviets were to the idea of discussing, openly, that they had held American prisoners at one point in time. I testified before a Soviet committee of Peoples Deputies about Soviet control and contact with captured Americans in WWII, Korea, the Cold War, and in Vietnam. I met with 3 Soviet Generals at a Soviet Military headquarters in Moscow including 3-Star Soviet General Vitaly Varennikov, his deputy General Bethehtin, and General Vladimir Iljich Fedchik.

 

   In a private meeting in Moscow on July 23, 1990 between Soviet officials and a delegation of 10 American Vietnam veterans of which I was a member, General Dmitri Volkogonov, the Director of the Institute of Military History made a startling admission about American POWs, through two members of the Supreme Soviet Vladimir V. Finogenov and Pavel V. Shet'ko-"When the Soviets took the German area they captured 76 Americans who were fighting with the Germans. In 1945 the Soviet Army liberated 22,429 U.S. POWs in German camps and took them back to the Soviet Union." General Volkogonov is now the Russian head of the of the Joint Russian-American Commission on POWs.

 

   Thus, the Soviet historical records produced statistics of 22,429 Americans taken to the Soviet Union from German POW camps, match almost identically with German prison records of 20,261 missing Americans who were alive in German POW camps over run by the Soviets that were uncovered by Sanders, Sauter, and Kirkwood and presented in their book "Soldiers of Misfortune". Very clearly the Soviets appear to be serious and ready, willing and able to discuss American MIAs who fell into their hands.

 

   The Soviets directed the interrelation of captured American POWs in Korea and Vietnam. On June 12, 1992 the President of Russia, Boris Yeltsin gave the U.S. Senate a list of 535 Americans who were debriefed by the Soviets. These debriefings were found in the files of the KGB.

 

   In some very specific cases, the Soviets, took some captured American POWs covertly to the Soviet Union, or so the theory goes. The theory is supported, in part, by information taken from three informants files, archived at the State Department.

 

   -1. American officers and soldiers who had been taken prisoners in Korea.
Whereabouts-Camp Potma, Irkutsk, Taiebet & Omsk. "Various people reported seeing American soldiers captured in Korea." Date of Report-January 18, 1955. Informant-John Noble, received from conversations with other  prisoners.

 

   -2. 9 American fliers from Korea with rank of Major and Captain.

   Whereabouts-Kirov Camp. Informant-William Marchuk "received information from Otto Herman Kirschner, German POW not at Potma. Kirschner said he had been in Kirov with these flyers." Marchuk was released with Noble Jan-1955.

 

   -3. At the U.S. Embassy, Brussels on September 5, 1960- "a walk-in Polish refugee said that he was released on May 1, 1960, after seven and one-half years detention, from Soviet prison Camp No.307 near Bulun...he became acquainted in the Soviet camp with two American Army prisoners who were captured in Korea in 1951-a lieutenant and a sergeant."

 

   Soviet reporters and film makers during the Vietnam war reported seeing and meeting with captured American POWs, who did not come home at the end of the war.

 

   -1. Ivan Schedrov a reporter for Pravda published a story along with a post-capture picture of Lt.Col. David Hrdlicka on August 31, 1966. Hrdlicka was shot down over Laos and captured on May 18, 1965. On March 15, 1968 Ivan Schedrov wrote, "I have met David Hrdlicka (and) had an opportunity to talk to him."

 

   -2. Capt. James Grace was shot down over Laos on June 15, 1968. His capture was shown as part of a Soviet propaganda film on prisoners, showing Capt. Grace alive and under guard in 1969.

 

   -3. Lt. David M. Christian was shot down over North Vietnam on June 2, 1965. The wreckage of his A4E aircraft was located but there was no sign of Lt. Christian. In June 1965 Provda described Christian, by name, the color of his eyes, the pictures he was carrying, and the contents of his pockets.

 

   The Soviets ran an effective program of encouraging defection, transferring broken soldiers into Moscow to be used for propaganda purposes. During the Vietnam war 4 U.S. defectors crossed over in Japan, when their ship, "The Intrepid" was docked. They were taken to Moscow where they made anti-war propaganda broadcasts. They were Michael Linder, Craig Anderson, Richard Bailey and John Barlla. Jon Sweeney was taken from Vietnam to Moscow where he made propaganda productions before he was released June 17, 1970.

On May 13, 1968 Phillip Callicoat, Terry Whitmore, Edwin Arnett, Mark Shapiro, and Kenneth Griggs, all U.S. servicemen went on Soviet TV speaking out against the Vietnam war. On May 17, 1968 Joseph Knetz with the USMC went on Soviet TV and denounced the Vietnam war and his American citizenship. The KGB even set up an American city in Russia in which to train its KGB penetration agents to conduct espionage, directed against the United States.

 

   The Soviet system kept all of their actions very secret, so it should not a surprise, to the U.S., that the former employees of the KGB, would not be forth coming with all that they know. Likewise the U.S. who trains its agents to operate covertly behind enemy lines, would not be forth coming with all the secrets that are still hidden away.

 

   The Joint Russian-American Commission on POWs was set up in May 1992, to address the issues surround the question, "What happened to the prisoners who were captured alive but not released?" Task Force-Russia staffed up to support the inquire with documentation collection-consolidation, witness interviews, and was tasked to explore leads in Russia.

 

   Cooperation between two opposing forces is not something that comes easily, expressly when it comes to how secrets are collected and kept hidden. There is some discussion between U.S. intelligence professionals about obfuscation in Russia by some officials close to the investigation. There are some Russian officers that are having trouble adjusting to cooperation and there are limits to which some Russians have tried to restrict the inquire. The U.S. simply needs to work through these restrictions and move the inquire forward.

 

   Some major accomplishments are being achieved as a result of the inquire by joint U.S. and Russian officials.

 

   Unprecedented successes can be outlined in the context of political agreement at the highest levels of the U.S. and Russian governments, who have made the commitment and shown the resolve to look into the last known alive cases where American prisoners were reported in Soviet hands. There are some 90 Soviet prisons that have been identified, where Americans were reported by released prisoners. The U.S. has sent teams to some of these old prison and found prison registration cards and records listing Americans who

were held as prisoners. Some died in prison and some were transferred on to other prisons. One prison registration card bears the name of Robert Lovein, born in 1920 in New York. He was held at Odessa Transit Camp 139. The prison records indicate that he left the camp on March 25, 1945, current whereabouts unknown.

 

   On December 10, 1992 Maj. Butch Burchett a member of Task Force Russia got into the Soviet prison archives at IRKUTSK and located prisoners registration cards on Carl Wever who was born in 1896 in Chicago, Illinois and Murry Fields born in Brooklin, New York in 1919. Maj. Burchett also gained access to the records at the Soviet prison at KHABAROVSK and found the records on Michael Hill or Gill born in New York.

 

   Some Americans located in Moscow, who got stuck in Russia during WWII, have been located and interviewed, but have decided not to return to America. The Joint Task Force moving forward unilaterally in the Russian Republic has found George Green, a former clerk at the Associated Press office in Moscow. Green and his sister Leah were arrested in 1946 and reported by many released prisoners as being held in Vorkuta prison. They are live freely in Moscow today and have stated that they have no desire to leave Russia, according to Maj. Burchett who interviewed them.

 

   For the first time ever, all the public domain records are being summoned together to support the inquire by Task Force Russia. Former prisoners of the Soviet prisons are being brought in and debriefed seriously for the first time. Former-POWs like John Noble and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn are being brought to Washington to be seriously debriefed for the first time ever, about their knowledge of Americans they saw or heard about while imprisoned in the Soviet Union.

 

   John Noble was debriefed by Task Force Russia in January 1993, 38-years after his release from the Soviet prison system, in January 1955. John provided the Task Force with the location of a previously unknown archive in Minsk where he had located his Russian prison records through a Soviet attorney.

 

   I myself was brought to Washington to be debriefed for 6 hours on information I have collected over the last 10 years on the Soviet Connection to captured American POWs. Of particular interests to the Task Force were a collection of Soviet publications, I had collected over the last several years. One story written by Maj. Valerii Amirov on June 30, 1992 in Na Strazhe (a Soviet military newspaper) interviews Soviet 1Lt. Vladimir Roshchin who went to Korea in 1951 with a special group to take an American Saber jet to a Soviet airfield in China. Maj. Amirov had written another story in Na Strazhe on May 9, 1991 about Soviet Lt. Grigorii Matevosovich Dzhagarov who went to Korea in 1952 with the mission of downing American aircraft and capturing on board electronic equipment to be shipped to the

Soviet Union for study. The story also tells how an American was captured by the Soviet forces after they downed the aircraft.

 

   Another batch of documents of particular interest to the Task Force were those I had received from other researchers that related to 3 groups of Americans named in Soviet prisons in documents in the State Departments archives.

 

---The first group of 18 names of Americans were taken from the State Department documents. In June 1955 the Soviets released several Austrian prisoners. The Red Cross obtained statements, from these released Austrian's about Americans who they had seen in specific prison in the USSR. The Red Cross then turned these records over to the State Department.

 

---The second group of 10 names of Americans are from a shoot down on April 8, 1950 of a U.S. Navy PB4Y-2 that disappeared over the Baltic Sea near Libau, Latvia. Two Americans (Noble and Marchuk) released in January 1955 reported information they received, while being held as prisoners inside the Soviet prison system, on survivors of this shoot down as reported by other prisoners.

 

---The third group of 34 names of Americans were given by released German, Japanese, Austrian and Iran prisoners. The State Department kept 51 documents entitled "AMERICAN CITIZENS DETAINED IN THE USSR" that contained  these 34 names. The Task Force had gone to some of these prisons, listed on these State Department records and found prison registration cards on some of the Americans who were named by released former Soviet prisoners.

 

   The Russians, for the first time ever, are permitting record reviews and on site searches, accompanied with interviews with Soviet citizens who talked to and put their hands on the American prisoners who were kept in Russia.

 

   The notion that the search be abandoned, just after the inquire has staffed up and has started to move forward, is very premature in my

judgement. The probe should continue as the families of these MIAs deserve an expatiation as to what happened to their missing loved ones.

 

   Political interference with the production of intelligence has been exposed by those who leaked the secrets State Department cable, dated December 10, 1992. Some may see the finding of answers to questions about missing Americans in Russia, as counter-productive to improving relations between the U.S. and Russia and leaked the cable. There are those who would have their preferred policy bolstered-that the Soviets do not now have any live American prisoners-by leaking this secret cable. These same policy makers have attempted to through water on the progress of the Task Force, by leaking information that shows there are some troubles in the area of total Russian cooperation. And, some U.S. agencies are suppressing intelligence that challenges their views on the "Soviet Connection" to U.S. POWs. The faction within the State Department that does not want the inquire-into Americans who were taken to Russia-to move forward, are as much a challenge to progress as some Russians who are trying to protect their home grown secret knowledge of what happened to the Americans who ended up in the Soviet Union.

 

   I challenge the views of those who want to suppress or derail the inquire into the "Soviet Connection" to captured American prisoners, as shallow minded. Never before in the history of the world has the opportunity presented itself to find out what happened to these missing Americans who fell into Soviet hands. We should continue to try to get to the bottom of the POW questions even if the pace of progress does not meet a Western  vision of expectations. It is our duty to ensure that America's missing, not be ignored and we should not be blind and deaf to the continuing opportunity to collect data inside the Soviet Union that can show what happened to the missing Americans, after they were taken prisoner.

 

   Should any readers of this story possess knowledge of Americans who were imprisoned in the Soviet Union please contact Col. Jerry Parr with Task Force Russia 703-325-1755 so these leads can chase down inside of Russia and a sincere attempt to resolve the issue can continue.

 

   Should anyone have any questions about this material or have anything to

add to the Soviet Connection story, please contact-

 

Michael Van Atta

Director, The POW Educational Fund

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced earlier this week that Heilman's remains are being returned to his family for burial with full ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced the remains Army Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington of Dawson, Oklahoma had been identified.
 
Air Force Master Sgt. Thomas Ricketson, a medic with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency examines a piece of aircraft wreckage during an ...

 
A team representing the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency conducted a mission in Slovenia in July to search for the remains of Sgt. Alfonso ...

 

 
During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in September and October 2004, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, (a predecessor to DPAA) ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 June, 2018 09:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Mason, H.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am

 

Navy Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1540831/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mason-h/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Mason was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Mason.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mason's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 June, 2018 09:25
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia Airman Accounted-For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. John S. Bailey, accounted for on Sept. 18, 2017,

will be buried June 13 in Winchester, Virginia.

 

Bailey, 28, of Woodstock, Virginia, was killed during World War II.

 

His cousin, Julie Sayre, of Saint Helena Island, South Carolina, is

available for interviews at (843) 271-4771.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Bailey on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Jan. 21, 1944, Bailey was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron,

(Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Helen Island,

Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when his B-24J bomber crashed shortly after

take-off. 

 

Following the crash, the squadron's physician recovered the remains of six

individuals who died in the crash and interred them in the Main Marine

Cemetery No. 33 on Betio Island. 

 

Following the war, the U.S. Army's 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and

1947.  Using Marine Corps records, they began the task of consolidating all

the remains from isolated burial sites into a single cemetery called Lone

Palm Cemetery.  The remains of the crew on the B-24J bomber were believed to

be among those moved, however Bailey's remains were not identified and he

was declared non-recoverable.

 

In May 2017, DPAA, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., returned

to Betio to conduct excavations of osseous remains.  The remains were sent

to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Bailey's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, and

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for their partnership in this

recovery mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Bailey's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 June, 2018 09:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Alabama Pilot Accounted-For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Robert Keown, accounted for on Nov. 8, 2017, will be

buried June 15 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Keown, 24, of Scottsboro, Alabama, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, John Keown, of Decatur, Alabama, is available for interviews at

(256) 350-4086.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Keown on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On April 16, 1944, Keown was a the pilot of one of four P-38s of the 36th

Fighter Squadron, 8th Fighter Group, on a mission in a P-38 aircraft to

escort a B-25 medium bomber on an aerial search near the mouth of the Sepik

River in Papua New Guinea.  The escort planes encountered heavy overcast

conditions and charted a course for an auxiliary airfield.  The aircraft

turned toward open ocean to find a break in the clouds, when Keown and his

wingman became separated from the other aircraft.  Keown was reported

missing in action after all four aircraft failed to return following the

mission.  Due to weather conditions, no searches were conducted that day.

 

Due to a lack of information on Keown's status, the War Department declared

him deceased on Feb. 7, 1946.  In August 1949, the American Graves

Registration Service classified Keown as non-recoverable.

 

In April 1999, the Papua New Guinea National Museum and Art Gallery turned

over possible human remains to investigators from the U.S. Army Central

Identification Laboratory, Hawaii.  The remains had reportedly been found

amid wreckage from an airplane crash. In August and September 2015, Pacific

Wrecks, Inc., through a partnership with DPAA, interviewed witnesses and

surveyed a crash site that possibly correlated an account by local farmer

Soka Dodon, who reported finding remains on his land in the 1980s, before

burying the remains in the Torik Village Cemetery.  In the 1990s, Dodon

exhumed the remains and turned them over to a relative, John Bonding, a

resident of Kikiapa Village. 

 

To identify Keown's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Soka Dodon, Mr. John Bonding, the Papua New Guinea

Government and Pacific Wrecks, Inc., for their partnerships in this

recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Quinn's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments

Commission site, in the Philippines, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 June, 2018 08:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Marine Accounted-For From World War II To Be Buried With
Full Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Charles A. Drew, accounted for on Sept. 20, 2017,
will be buried June 11, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C. 

Drew, 29, of Coalinga, California, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in
World War II.

His cousin, John Lund, of Millbrae, California, is available for interviews
at (650) 692-7777.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Drew on file.

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National
Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil


//////

In November 1943, Drew was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine
Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese
resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert
Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense
fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and
more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.
Drew died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration
Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Drew's
remains were not recovered.  On Oct. 7, 1949, a military review board
declared Drew's remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Drew's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and
anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as
circumstantial and material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this
mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II. Drew's name is recorded on the Tablets of
the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in WWII.
A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted
for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420/1169.
  

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 June, 2018 11:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Oklahoma Soldier Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington, accounted for on April 23, will be buried

June 9 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

 

Sappington, 19, of Dawson, Oklahoma, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Gerald Bruner, is available for interviews at (918) 261-1962.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Sappington on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In January 1945, Sappington was a member of 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st

Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division.  On Jan 10, the

309th Infantry launched a number of attacks in the Hürtgen Forest of

Germany.  His company attempted to capture two hills near the Raffelsbrand

sector of the forest.  Enemy gunfire and artillery strikes forced the

Americans to fall back.  The following day, reinforcements led the attack on

the hills, also sustaining heavy losses.  At some point during the two days

of fighting, Sappington was mortally wounded.   Because no Soldiers from his

unit could confirm his death, he was reported missing in action as of Jan.

11, 1945. 

 

In 1947, a German woodcutter found a set of remains that were subsequently

recovered by the American Graves Registration Command.  Unable to identify

the remains, they were buried as Unknown, and designated X-5396.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command extensively

investigated the Hürtgen Forest, but could find no evidence leading to the

recovery of Sappington’s remains.  Unable to make a correlation with remains

found in 1947, he was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 10, 1951. 

 

In 2016, a historian from DPAA conducted a study of combat records and

unresolved American losses in the Raffelsbrand sector of the Hürtgen Forest.

During this effort, the historian determined that the X-5396 remains had

been recovered in the 309th Infantry combat zone and recommended that

officials disinter the remains for scientific comparison to Pfc Sappington.

Based off of that research, and a thorough scientific review of the

biological and dental records, DPAA and the American Battle Monuments

Commission exhumed X-5396 in June 2017 and transferred the remains to DPAA.

 

To identify Sappington’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological, dental and chest radiograph comparison analysis, and

material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Sappington’s name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Henri-Chappelle American Cemetery in Hombourg,

Belgium, an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the other

MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 June, 2018 09:41
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas Soldier Killed During Korean War To Be Buried With Full
Military Honors

Dear Editor,

Army Sgt. Julius E. McKinney, accounted for on March 5, 2018, will be buried
June 8, in Corinth, Missisisppi.


McKinney, 23, of Clay, Arkansas, was killed during the Korean War.

His nephew, William E. Huff, of Iuka, Mississippi, is available for interviews
at (662) 284-5082.

The Department of Defense has no photos of McKinney on file.

For more information, contact:

SFC Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
2300 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C 20301-2300
(703) 699-1420
Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

OR:

Chuck Prichard, APR
Director, Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)
(703) 699-1169
charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

/////

In late November 1950, McKinney was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd
Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700
South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT),
which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was
attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks
continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S. Army
evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had
been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. McKinney was reported
missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after he was last seen on the east side
of the Chosin Reservoir.

McKinney's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning
Americans reported McKinney as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack
of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him non-recoverable on Jan. 16, 1956.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in September and October 2004, the
Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, (a predecessor to DPAA) Recovery Team 2,
conducted recovery operations with elements of the Korean People's Army
(KPA) in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir.  A secondary burial site was
excavated in the vicinity of Twikkae Village, Changjin County.  The remains
of at least five individuals were accessioned to the Central Identification
Laboratory in Honolulu.

To identify McKinney's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, which matched his family, anthropological analysis, which
matched his records, and material evidence.

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea
by American recovery teams.  McKinney's name is recorded on the Courts of the
Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean
War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been
accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website

at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa  or call

(703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 June, 2018 09:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: CORRECTION: Arkansas Soldier Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Please note:

The burial location has been changed to Ravenden, Arkansas.

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton, accounted for on February 5, will be

buried June 8 in Ravenden, Arkansas.

 

Tipton, 20, of Imboden, Arkansas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His half-brother, Kenneth Tipton, of Jupiter, Florida, is available for

interviews at (901) 484-4473.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Tipton on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tipton was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Tipton. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Tipton.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Tipton's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA, as well as

circumstantial evidence and dental and anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,917 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Tipton's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 June, 2018 08:51
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kentucky Soldier Killed During Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Ernest L.R. Heilman, accounted for on Aug. 19, 2016, will be

buried June 8 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Heilman, 19, of Greenup, Kentucky, was captured and killed during the Korean

War.

 

His niece, C. Bernadetta Largent, of Chillicothe, Ohio, is available for

interviews at (740) 773-4826.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Heilman on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Feb. 13, 1951, Heilman was a member of Battery B, 15th Field Artillery

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, and was declared missing in action when

his unit was breaking a roadblock in the vicinity of Hoengsong, South Korea.

 

Reports provided by enemy forces indicated that Heilman was captured and

died at Changsong prisoner of war camp in North Korea.  Based on this

information, the Army declared him deceased on June 8, 1951.

 

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from the prisoner

of war cemetery at Camps 1 and 3, Changsong, North Korea, were sent to the

Central Identification Unit for attempted identification.  The remains were

designated X-14236 and were declared unidentifiable.  They were then

transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the

Punchbowl, in Honolulu and were interred as Unknown.

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-14236 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, X-14236 was

disinterred on June 13, 2016 and sent to DPAA's laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Heilman's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory

analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison

analysis, all which matched Heilman's records; as well as circumstantial

evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,702 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Heilman's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from the Korean

War.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 June, 2018 08:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Duran, A.)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, killed during World War II, was
accounted for on May 22, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1537448/
airman-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-duran-a/

In February 1944, Duran was a nose gunner on a B-24H Liberator, assigned to
the 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air
Force. On February 25, 1944, the final day of Operation Argument, Duran's
aircraft came under attack by German fighters and anti-aircraft fire, while
he was on a bombing mission targeting Regensburg, Germany. The tail gunner
in another aircraft witnessed a direct hit on Duran's aircraft, which tore
off a section of the right wing. Nine of the ten crew members were able to
bail from the aircraft before it crashed. The tail gunner from Duran's
aircraft reported he had last seen Duran alive in the aircraft, but believed
Duran did not bail out. All nine of Duran's crewmates survived the bail out
and were captured and interrogated in Verona, Italy, where they were told
that one body had been found in the aircraft wreckage. The crash site was
reported to be located near Ljubljana, Slovenia, an area then under Axis
control.

DPAA is grateful to the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs,
and Equal Opportunities, the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage
of Slovenia, the residents of Pokojišče, the several private Slovenian
researchers involved, the Office of Australian War Graves Commission, and
the RAAF Directorate of History and Heritage for their partnership in this
recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days
prior to scheduled funeral services.

Duran's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence
American Cemetery in Impruneta, Italy, along with other MIAs from WWII. A
rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted
for.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced Friday that the remains of Navy Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton are being returned ...
 
Statistics compiled by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) indicate some 7,702 Americans remain missing from the Korean War as of ...
 
Then, in 2016, a historian from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency conducted a study of records and unresolved American losses in the ...

 
Remains buried in the Netherlands have been identified as a soldier with Texas Panhandle ties. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said ...

 

 
A nine-person military team from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which has a lab on Oahu, dug through mud and plane wreckage in 2016 ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 May, 2018 10:42
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Adkins, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Marvin B. Adkins, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on April 11, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1536169/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-adkins-m/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Adkins was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Adkins.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Adkins' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Coalition of Families of Korean and Cold War POW/MIAs

 

Media Release

Memorial Day 2018

Missing American Servicemen

Need to be on the agenda for a U.S./North Korea Summit

In 2016, the Coalition of Families of Korean & Cold War POW/MIAs joined the Richardson Center for Global Engagement in talks with North Korea that resulted in an offer to return collected American remains from the Korean War. That offer still stands.

We call on the White House to accept this offer during the proposed U.S./DPRK summit.

We ask the media to help by bringing the issue to the forefront of public discussion. Follow-up talks need to negotiate the return of joint recovery operations to repatriate thousands more American remains buried beneath former battlefields, prisoner of war

camps, and in isolated air crash sites across North Korea. Deeper discussions need to address numerous reports that American P.O.W.s were left behind alive in North Korea following the Armistice.

U.S./North Korea talks offer unique opportunities to honor the nation’s noble promise to leave no man behind. Japanese and South Korean abductees will be on the proposed agenda. Thousands of missing American servicemen should be there as well.

It is high time that, as a nation, we resolve the fate of these missing Americans, who served their country without answers to their stories, or closure for their families.

For more information, or to schedule an interview, please contact the Coalition.

 

coalitionoffamilies.org                                  818.259.9950                   coalitionoffamilies@gmail.com

PO Box 4194, Portsmouth, NH 03802

 

 
With Memorial Day having just passed, the sacrifice of men and women serving our country is still fresh on many people's minds. Many companies find ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced earlier this month the remains of Slapikas are being returned to his family for burial.
 
A North Texas family finally laid to rest a military family member who'd been missing in action in Korea for more than a half century. The funeral service ...
 
 
Heaven Can Wait is one of 30 United States aircraft retrieved by Project Recover, a six-year-old nonprofit that collaborates with the Defense POW/MIA ...
 
The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, the arm of the Pentagon responsible for finding and returning the nation's war dead, faced intense criticism ...
 
In total, 2,341 sailors, soldiers and Marines were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is still working to ...
 
The team will give its findings to the Department of Defense's POW/MIA Accounting Agency. That office seeks to recover the remains of those missing ...
 
In 2016, due to advances in forensic technology, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began to exhume unidentified remains associated with the ...
 
Raymond Smith submitted a DNA sample and on June 2, 2016, according to Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency records, a lower jaw bone and ...

 
 
During research conducted by the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs, information was found in the Central Archives of Russian Ministry of ...

 

 
In this file photo, motorcyclists cross the Memorial Bridge during the 30th anniversary of the Rolling Thunder 'Ride for Freedom' demonstration in ...

 

 
But in 2003, the POW/MIA Accounting Command disinterred a single casket of unknowns from the USS Oklahoma that was thought to contain the ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency confirmed that remains found several years ago by a man while digging on his land belonged to Drake.
 
 
The recovery was the outcome of years of investigation by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency that were triggered by Cushing's determination ...
 
... and his country by continuing my now 20-year inquiry through the government and military Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for his remains.
 
They were finally located by a local man digging on his land several years ago. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency confirmed the remains ...
 
This circa 1940s photo released by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows Marine Corps Pfc. Francis E. Drake, born in Framingham, Mass., ...
 
According to military records, he was fatally struck by enemy fire while attempting to rescue a fellow Marine. He posthumously received a Silver Star for ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used DNA analysis to identify Quintero's remains.
 
Students are educated in a variety of disciplines and work hand-in-hand with the US Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 24 May, 2018 10:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For
(Nichols, C.)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Carl Nichols, killed during the attack on the USS
Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 27, 2018.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1531189/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-nichols-c/

On Dec. 7, 1941, Nichols was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which
was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by
Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which
caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths
of 429 crewmen, including Nichols.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the Nation