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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

2017
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2017

    
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
2nd Lt. Richard M. Horwitz U.S. Army Air Forces 716th Bomber Squadron, 449th Bombardment Group 2/28/1945 Italy 7/11/2017
Cpl. Anthony G. Guerriero U.S. Marine Corps Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/21/1943 Tarawa 7/11/2017
Cpl. Raymond C. Snapp U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/11/2017
Sgt. William A. Larkins U.S. Army Battery A, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 7/10/2017
Maj. James B. White U.S. Air Force 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron 11/24/1969 Laos 7/7/2017
Sgt. Richard G. Sowell U.S. Army 295th Joint Assault Signal Company, Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 106th Infantry 7/7/1944 Saipan 6/27/2017
Lt. William Q. Punnell U.S. Navy Reserve VF-14 Fighter Squadron 7/25/1944 Palau 6/26/2017
Sgt. 1st Class Max E. Harris U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/12/1950 North Korea 6/23/2017
Pfc. Gerald F. Wipfli U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 112th Infantry 11/4/1944 Germany 6/23/2017
Cpl. Clarence R. Skates U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 6/22/2017
Master Sgt. George R. Housekeeper U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/12/1950 North Korea 6/21/2017
Cpl. Thomas H. Mullins U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 6/21/2017
Pfc. Charlie H. Hill U.S. Army Battery D, 15th Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Self-propelled Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 6/21/2017
Capt. Robert E. Holton U.S. Air Force 497th Tactical Fighter Squadron 1/29/1969 Laos 6/16/2017
Pfc. Albert E. Atkins U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team 5/23/1951 South Korea 6/13/2017
Pvt. Archie W. Newell U.S. Marine Corps Company C, 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/12/2017
Col. Roosevelt Hestle, Jr. U.S. Air Force 388th Tactical Fighter Squadron 7/6/1966 Vietnam 6/12/2017
Staff Sgt. Gerald L. Jacobsen U.S. Army 134th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division 7/15/1944 France 6/9/2017
Pfc. George B. Murray U.S. Marine Corps Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/9/2017
1st Lt. George W. Betchley U.S. Army Air Forces 429th Bombardment Squadron, 2nd Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 3/22/1945 Poland 6/9/2017
Cpl. Edward L. Borders U.S. Army Dog Battery, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons), 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 6/5/2017
Cmdr. Charles B. Goodwin U.S. Navy Reserve Detachment D., VFP-63, CVW-15 9/8/1965 Vietnam 6/1/2017
Capt. Joseph S. Smith U.S. Air Force Reserve 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 401st Tactical Fighter Wing 4/4/1971 Cambodia 5/12/2017
Cpl. Glen E. Kritzwiser U.S. Army Battery C, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 5/9/2017
Cpl. Henry Andregg, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company C, 2nd Amphibious Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 5/9/2017
Pfc. Sam J. Kourkos U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/21/1943 Tarawa 5/9/2017
Pfc. Lonnie B.C. Eichelberger U.S. Army Company I, 371st Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division 2/10/1945 Italy 5/5/2017
Staff Sgt. Michael Aiello U.S. Army Company G, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment 9/30/1944 Netherlands 5/5/2017
Cpl. John Lane U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/31/1950 South Korea 5/3/2017
Cpl. Frank L. Sandoval U.S. Army Battery A, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 5/3/2017
Cpl. Richard J. Seadore U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 12/14/1950 South Korea 4/28/2017
2nd Lt. George S. Bussa U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/19/2017
Pvt. Walter F. Piper U.S. Army Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 4/18/2017
Seaman 1st Class Milton R. Surratt U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/14/2017
Cpl. Leslie R. Sutton U.S. Army Battery C, 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 4/13/2017
Pvt. Harold S. Hirschi U.S. Army Air Forces Headquarters Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group 11/19/1942 Philippines 4/13/2017
Pfc. Richard A. Lucas U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/26/1950 North Korea 4/13/2017
Sgt. 1st Class Richard G. Cushman U.S. Army Company A, 72nd Medium Tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/5/1950 North Korea 4/12/2017
Technician 4th Grade John Kovach, Jr. U.S. Army Company C, 192nd Tank Battalion 11/19/1942 Philippines 4/7/2017
Ensign William M. Thompson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/6/2017
1st Lt. Ewart T. Sconiers U.S. Army Air Forces 414th Bombardment Squadron, 97th Bombardment Group 1/24/1944 Poland 4/5/2017
Cpl. Freddie L. Henson U.S. Army Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/3/2017
Pfc. Reece Gass U.S. Army Company E, 33rd Armored Regiment, 3rd Armored Division 1/14/1945 Belgium 3/30/2017
Cpl. William R. Sadewasser U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 3/23/2017
Seaman 1st Class Monroe Temple U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/22/2017
Cpl. Daniel F. Kelly U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/26/1950 North Korea 3/22/2017
Pfc. Jack J. Fox U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/22/1943 Tarawa Atoll 3/21/2017
Pvt. Donald S. Spayd U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 3/16/2017
Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Casto U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/15/2017
Pfc. Robert E. Mitchell U.S. Army Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/13/2017
Lance Cpl. John D. Killen, III U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division 6/30/1967 Vietnam 3/9/2017
Cpl. Runnels, Glyn. L, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division 6/30/1967 Vietnam 3/9/2017
Fireman 1st Class Elmer T. Kerestes U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2017
1st Lt. Robert E. Oxford U.S. Army Air Forces 425th Bomber Squadron, 308th Bomb Group, 14th Air Force 1/25/1944 India 3/6/2017
Capt. John A. House, II U.S. Marine Corps Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 265, Marine Aircraft Group 16 6/30/1967 Vietnam 3/6/2017
Pfc. Manuel M. Quintana U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment 7/27/1950 South Korea 3/4/2017
Capt. James W. Boyden U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Marine Torpedo Bombing Squadron 233, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force 2/14/1944 Papua New Guinea 3/3/2017
Sgt. Willie Rowe U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/25/1950 North Korea 3/2/2017
2nd Lt. Harry H. Gaver, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/1/2017
Capt. Daniel W. Thomas U.S. Air Force Reserve 23rd Tactical Air Support Squadron 7/6/1971 Vietnam 2/25/2017
Fireman 1st Class Walter B. Rogers U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Fireman 1st Class Lawrence H. Fecho U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Seaman 1st Class Paul S. Raimond U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Steward's Mate 1st Class Cyril I. Dusset U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Pvt. William D. Gruber U.S. Army Air Forces 93rd Bomber Squadron, 19th Bomber Group 9/27/1942 Philippines 2/22/2017
Fireman 1st Class Charles W. Thompson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/17/2017
Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/15/2017
Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert L. Pribble U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/14/2017
Muscian 1st Class Elliot D. Larsen U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/8/2017
Seaman 2nd Class George T. George U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/8/2017
Storekeeper 2nd Class Glenn G. Cyriack U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/7/2017
Fireman 1st Class William H. Kennedy U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/7/2017
Gunner's Mate 1st Class Arthur C. Neuenschwander U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/6/2017
Fireman 1st Class Michael Galajdik U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/3/2017
Fireman 3rd Class Robert N. Walkowiak U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/3/2017
Sgt. Donald D. Noehren U.S. Army Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 2/3/2017
2nd Lt. John D. Mumford U.S. Army Air Forces 318th Fighter Squadron, 325th Fighter Group, 15th Air Force 6/6/1944 Ukraine 1/17/2017
Captain Robert R. Barnett U.S. Air Force 8th Bomb Squadron 4/7/1966 Laos 1/13/2017
Sgt. James W. Sharp U.S. Army Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 1/10/2017
2nd Lt. Charles E. Carlson U.S. Army Air Forces 62nd Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force 12/23/1944 Germany 1/9/2017
1st Lt. William J. Gray U.S. Army Air Forces 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group 4/16/1945 Germany 1/5/2017
Mr. Peter W. Atkinson Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 10/25/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. Maax C. Hammer, Jr. Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/22/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. John D. Armstrong Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/8/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
2nd Lt Ernest Matthews U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. James O. Whitehurst U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. Larry Roberts U.S. Marine Corps Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force 11/25/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Gunnery Sgt. Sidney A. Cook U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Cpl. Walter G. Critchley U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Mess Attendant 1st Class Ralph M. Boudreaux U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/3/2017
1st Lt. William C. Ryan U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Marine Fighter Attack Force 115, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force Pacific 5/11/1969 Laos 1/3/2017
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Don O. Neher U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 12/14/2016

      Note:  the above chart is now updated in it's entirety regularly after it was noticed that names were INSERTED in the chart long after the accounted for date, changing the original chart.
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

posted 07/16/2017                       Source:    http://www.dpaa.mil/OurMissing/RecentlyAccountedFor.aspx
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
 
The announcement was made by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Ryan, a Navy yeoman 3rd class, had been serving on the U.S.S. ...

Navy Yeoman 3rd Class Edmund T. Ryan's remains were unidentified for decades

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
But for about a decade his job has been to work for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), whose sole mission is to recover missing ...

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From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 26 July, 2017 10:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Massachusetts Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Yeoman 3rd

Class Edmund T. Ryan, accounted for on Dec. 9, 2016, will be buried August 2

in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Ryan, 21, of Wilbraham, Massachusetts, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma during World  War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Ryan on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ryan was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Ryan. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Ryan.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Ryan's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA

Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched

family members, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis,

to include dental comparisons, which matched Ryan's records.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,046 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Recently, the U.S. Department of Defense's POW/MIA Accounting Agency told Harris' relatives it identified his remains after military search teams ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Bloomington Pantagraph    07/25/17     Elmer Kerestes was a Navy fireman first class aboard the USS Oklahoma
The remainder were buried in 46 plots in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
KARE   07/25/17         Army Private First Class Charles Follese 
According to the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), North Korea returned 208 boxes of human remains to the U.S. from ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
After 65 years the remains of US Army Reserve Cpl. Edward Lee3 Borders, a Korean War MIA/POW will return home on Thursday, July 27, 2017.

 

Burial and funeral services are set for the Harrisburg soldier missing in action for 66 years.

Services for Cpl. Edward Lee Borders will be 11: AM Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the J.M. Weirauch Funeral Home with Rev. Chris Winkleman officiating and interment with full military honors following at Cottage Grove Cemetery east of Harrisburg.....
After 65 years the remains of US Army Reserve Cpl. Edward Lee3 Borders, a Korean War MIA/POW will return home on Thursday, July 27, 2017. Cpl. Borders was a member of the Army Batter D 82nd Anti Aircraft Artilery Automatic Wheapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action of February 13, 1951. Later the communist forces reported he died in a POW camp on December 26, 1951

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Photo By Sgt. Kelly Street | U.S. Service members with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) carry cases...... read more read more.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
To identify Martin's remains, scientists from Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used ...
....It was not until 2001 when Martin’s remains were finally found on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea. The remains were not positively identified until April 2016..... 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
DNAinfo           Pvt. Joseph C. Carbone, who served in the 2nd Marine Division, was killed on the first day of combat in the Battle of Tarawa
... killed almost 75 years ago fighting in World War II, have been found, according to the U.S. Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Mohave Valley News   07/25/17     U.S. Army Cpl. Clarence R. Skates
Family finally getting closure with return of POW's remains ... according to information provided by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency about the ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, with a budget of $112 million, has the bulk of its operations based out of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, ..

.The Pentagon has tapped Navy Rear Adm. Jon C. Kreitz to be the next deputy director for operations of the agency that searches for, recovers and identifies missing American war dead from around the world.

 
However, after Walker did some checking, she found that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) had indeed identified the remains of a ...

U.S. Army Reserve Cpl. Edward Lee Borders

 
But during the annual meeting of the National League of POW*MIA Families in Washington DC, Holton's family received some long awaited news.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 July, 2017 07:40
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Illinois Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Army Cpl. Edward L.

Borders, accounted for on June 5, 2017, will be buried July 29 in his

hometown.

 

Borders, 20, of Harrisburg, Illinois, died as a prisoner of war during the

Korean War.

 

His niece, Phyllis Walker, of Marion, Illinois, is available for interviews

if you would like to contact her at 618-889-7928.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Borders on file.

 

/////

 

 

In early February 1951, Borders was a member of D Battery, 82nd

Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons), 2nd Infantry

Division, when American units began supporting South Korean Army attacks

against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area

known as the Central Corridor in North Korea.  D Battery was part of a group

known as Support Force 21 (SF21) and provided artillery fire support for the

South Korean Army during its attack north on Hongch'on.  On the evening of

Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counter offensive against the

South Koreans, who were forced to withdraw, leaving Borders' unit and the

rest of SF21 behind at Changbong-ni.  The SF 21 marched south along Route

29, fighting through ambushes and roadblocks, to Hoengsong and eventually to

the city of Wonju.  Borders was reported missing in action as of Feb. 13,

1951 when he did not report with his unit in Wonju.

 

A list provided by the CPVF and Korean People's Army (KPA) on Dec. 26, 1951,

reported Borders died while a prisoner of war.  Based on this information,

the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Feb. 3, 1954.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered

during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of

at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war.  Of the 208 boxes,

14 were reported to have been recovered from Ryongpho-ri, Suan County, North

Hwanghae Province, North Korea.  This village is believed to be in close

proximity to the Suan Bean Camp, part of the Suan Prisoner of War Camp

Complex, which was a temporary holding area for a large number of soldiers

captured by the CPVF during the war.  

 

To identify Borders' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mtDNA, Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-SYR)

and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as

anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial

evidence.

 

Today, 7,740 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 July, 2017 07:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Minnesota Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Ageny has announced that Navy Fireman 1st

Class Elmer T. Kerestes, accouunted for on March 5, 2017, will be buried

July 29 in Holdingford, Minnesota.

 

Kerestes, 22, of Holding Township, Minnesota, was killed during the attack

on the USS Oklahoma during World War II.

 

His niece, Janet Klug, of Freeport, Minnesota, is available for interviews

if you would like to contact her at 320-293-2182.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Kerestes on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kerestes was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Kerestes. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Kerestes.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Kerestes' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family members, as well as circumstantial evidence and

laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,048 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
The grant comes through the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which searches for the "fullest possible accounting" for missing U.S. military ...
 
Specifically, Darcy plans to petition the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) to gather the remains into a single site that would then include a ...
 
The effort was coordinated by the U.S. military's Defense P.O.W./M.I.A. Accounting Agency, which is tasked with bringing home remains of lost service ...

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182323/soldier/
Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Seadore)

By | May 15, 2017


Seadore could not be located and was he was reported absent without leave (AWOL.) His status was later amended to missing in action.  ...... Remains were handed over to the agency on May 28, 1992 and sent to the Central Identification Laboratory (now DPAA) for analysis.... 
For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

 

 
In 1997, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began using DNA to test remains, linking bones to families. The Seadore family was notified and ...

 

The Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) staged mass attacks and UN troops were forced south. Positioned about 30 miles north of Seoul, South Korea at Uijong-bu, Richard's regiment was hunkered down on defense. On Dec. 14, 1950, a reconnaissance patrol was sent out, with Company D remaining in defensive positions. The CPVF attacked the unit, in a battle that lasted all night. By morning, Richard's unit prevailed and pushed back the enemy.

But as the unit prepared to move, Richard could not be located. At first he was reported AWOL (Absent With Out Leave), but that report was soon amended to Missing-in-Action (MIA) pending an eye-witness confirmation of death.

.....

On Dec. 26, 1951, a year after his capture, North Korea sent out a propaganda broadcast with a list of soldiers' names of whom they had custody, reporting that Richard died in their camp.

Still the Army waited, because such reports out of the North were often found to be either false or mistaken. Proof was needed that Richard had indeed died. The Army needed a credible person to confirm his death. Until then, Richard was considered MIA.

The Army assumed Richard was a prisoner. They knew of horrific conditions in which the captured soldiers were enduring. Reports from released POWs and other soldiers told of “death marches.” Richard was among soldiers on such a march that took four weeks from Uijong-bu, South Korea to Saun County -- a destination well north of the 38th parallel in North Korea.

...

On occasion, there were prisoner and war dead exchanges. An exchanged soldier who was in a POW camp in Suan County, said he recalled Richard and he had died, inconclusively from Beriberi, a disease caused by a sparse diet and neglect.

When the Armistice was being negotiated in the fall of 1953, the Army released an official list, confirming Richard died on April 19, 1951, a day after his 22nd birthday. He suffered wounds in his arm from shrapnel in a battle before his death.

...

Then in 1999-2000, a U.S. recovery team received permission to go into Suan County, North Korea, where Richard had been held and died. The excavation teams recovered some skeletal remains from the former camp, with the help of hired local villagers. The detailed report shows workers digging at the camp site, which had become a rice paddy.

...

The Seadore family sacrificed two sons to the cause of freedom -- Richard in Korea and Larry in Vietnam.

````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

AND WAITED 60 YEARS FOR PUBLIC ACKNOWLEDGMENT BY DPPA (AND THEIR PREDECESSORS)  THAT HE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR
 


 
   
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA said investigators recovered Gray's remains last year. Two people who saw Gray's plane go down told the investigators where ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 14 July, 2017 08:23
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Guerriero)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Cpl. Anthony G. Guerriero, killed during World War II, has now

been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1247465/marine-

killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-guerriero/

 

In November 1943, Guerriero was assigned to Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd

Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance

on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in

an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at

Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than

2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Guerriero

died sometime on the second day of battle, Nov. 21, 1943.

 

Interment services are pending.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 14 July, 2017 08:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Snapp)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Cpl. Raymond C. Snapp, killed during World War II, has

now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1247467/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-snapp/

 

In November 1943, Snapp was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance

on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in

an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at

Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than

2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Snapp died

sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

Interment services are pending.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 14 July, 2017 11:57
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Minnesota Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that  Army Pfc. Charles

C. Follese, accounted for on Dec. 17, 2016, will be buried July 25 in his

hometown.

 

Follese, 20, of Minneapolis, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His nephew, Michael Follese, of Burrnsville, Minnesota, is available for

interviews if you would like to contact him at 612-850-6192

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Follese on file.

 

/////

 

On Nov. 29, 1950, Follese was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 187th

Airborne Infantry Regiment.  Follese was killed during a mission to recover

casualties from a reconnaissance patrol that had been ambushed the previous

day near Hajoyang-ni, North Korea.  This patrol was also ambushed, following

the battle, Follese could not be accounted for and he was declared killed in

action on Nov. 30, 1950.

              

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned 208 boxes of commingled human

remains to the United States, which we determined to contain the remains of

at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean

documents included in the repatriation indicate that some of the remains

were recovered from the vicinity where Follese was believed to have died.

 

To identify Follese's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA),Y chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family members; as well as

dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records; and

circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,740 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains

that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by

American teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
He was identified on April 7 by analysts from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, which partners with the Defense POW-MIA Accounting ...
On Monday morning, the sisters of John Kovach, Jr., got the opportunity to bury his remains in Port Clinton’s Riverview Cemetery, more than 75 years after his death in the Philippines....
 
DULUTH, Minn. — The remains of a Duluth serviceman killed in World War II are returning home. Marine Sgt. James Hubert will be buried Saturday ..
Marine Sgt. James Hubert will be buried Saturday with full military honors in his hometown, nearly 74 years after he was killed. ...
 
The Navy has been working for years to identify the unknown victims through the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Ray Emory, a Pearl Harbor ...

This year, new DNA evidence identified Navy Seaman First Class Robert "Bobby" Monroe Temple among those lost on the USS Oklahoma in the Pearl Harbor attacks on Dec. 7, 1941. And on Wednesday, family, friends and members of the U.S. Navy laid Robert to rest with full military honors at the National Cemetery of the Pacific....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 13 July, 2017 08:42
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For (Horwitz)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Richard M. Horwitz, missing from World War II, has

now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1246142/airman-

missing-from-world-war-ii-accounted-for-horwitz/

 

On February 28, 1945, Horwitz was a member of the 716th Bomber Squadron,

449th Bombardment Group, along with ten other airmen assigned to a B-24J

Liberator aircraft, which departed Grottaglie Army Air Base, Italy, for a

combat mission. The mission targeted the Isarc-Albes railroad bridge in

northern Italy, which was part of Brennan Route, used by Germans to move

personnel and equipment out of Italy. Following the bombing run,

participating aircraft headed in the direction of their rally point, where

the planes would reform and return to their originating base. When leaving

the Isarco-Albes area, an aircraft was seen heading in the direction of the

rally point, but skimmed the mountain tops with at least two damaged

engines. The plane was last seen near Lake Wiezen in Austria. No parachutes

were seen exiting the aircraft. Based on this information, Horwitz was

reported missing in action.

 

Interment services are pending.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Italian government for their assistance in this

recovery.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Then in May, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said it had identified Sandoval's remains. On Tuesday, as the funeral came to an end, three ...
 

DULUTH, Minn. — The remains of a Duluth serviceman killed in World War II are returning home.

Marine Sgt. James Hubert will be buried Saturday with full military honors in his hometown, nearly 74 years after he was killed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Why not POW/DIC?  Prisoner of war -died in captivity.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 12 July, 2017 10:15
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured During The Korean War Accounted For (Larkins)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Sgt. William A. Larkins, captured during the Korean War, has now been

accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1244586/soldier
-captured-during-the-korean-war-accounted-for-larkins/

 

In late November 1950, Larkins was a member of Battery A, 503rd Field

Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting off persistent Chinese

attacks in the Ch'ongch'on River region of North Korea.  Through a series of

attacks, the Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) pressed 2ID units into local

withdrawals to avoid being outflanked.  On the night of Nov. 25, 1950, the

Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) began relentless attacks which

continued until the end of the month.  On Dec. 1,1950, the 503rd FA BN began

their movement down the Main Supply Route under continuous enemy mortar,

small arms and machine gun fire, toward the town of Sunchon, where Larkins

was reported missing in action.

 

Following the war, one returning prisoner of war reported that Larkins had

been captured and had died at an unknown prisoner of war camp in January

1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on

Jan. 31, 1951.

 

Interment services are pending.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
The call came the day before Bill and his wife, Judy, flew to Washington, D.C. in June for an annual meeting of the National League of POW/MIA ...
 
The Halifax County Historical Society is making a last plea for information before publishing a small book on Prisoners of War (POW) and Missing in ...
 
 
Hawaii News Now   07/11/17
Since 2015, 70 sets of remains at Punchbowl have been positively identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency as sailors who died on the ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 July, 2017 09:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Florida Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Fire

Controlman 3rd Class Robert L. Pribble, accounted for on Feb. 14, 2017, will

be buried July 18 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu.

 

Pribble, 19, of St. Petersburg, Florida, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Robert Pribble, of Jacksonville, Florida, is available for

interviews if you would like to contact him at 904-735-6001.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Pribble on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pribble was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Pribble. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Pribble.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Pribble's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched a cousin, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory

analysis, to include dental comparisons.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 July, 2017 09:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Army Cpl. John

Lane, Jr., accounted for on May 3, 2017, will be buried July 17 in Mountain

Home, Tennessee.

 

Lane, 18, of El Monte, California, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Lane on file.

 

/////

 

In late July 1950, Lane was assigned to Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion,

19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, when the Korean People's

Army attacked the city of Chinju, South Korea. The regiment set up defensive

positions before withdrawing east to regroup. Upon arrival south of Masan

the battalion began accounting for its soldiers and when Lane could not be

accounted for, he was reported missing in action as of July 31, 1950.

 

Following the war, no lists provided by the Chinese People's Volunteer

Forces or KPA listed Lane as a prisoner of war.  Additionally, no returning

American prisoners of war were able to provide any information regarding

Lane's whereabouts.  Due to the lack of information, the U.S. Army declared

him deceased on Dec. 31, 1953.

 

In 1987 Chinju government employees recovered remains believed to be

American while moving graves from an old cemetery for construction purposes.

The remains were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii and

accessioned into the laboratory in June 1987.

 

Upon examination of the remains, it was concluded that there were two

individuals. One set was identified in October 1987 as a soldier known to be

missing in action in the vicinity of Chinju, the last known location of

Lane.

 

To identify Lane's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used circumstantial and anthropological evidence,

including dental and chest radiograph comparison, as well as DNA analysis,

including mitochondrial DNA, which matched a niece and grand-nephew.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the South Korean government for their assistance in

this recovery.

 

Today, 7,741 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains

that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by

American teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Sandoval's remains were part of a box designated “Unknown X-14211,” and were only identified this year by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
KSLA-TV   07/11/17

ABINE PARISH, LA (KSLA) -

A Sabine Parish sailor will be formally laid to rest with full military honors 75 years after his death.

Services for Navy Seaman 1st Class Paul Smith Raimond, of Converse, are set for 11:30 a.m. Pacific (4:30 p.m. Central) Tuesday in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

 

Army Cpl. Frank Luna Sandoval of San Antonio departed for the Korean War almost 67 years ago, saying goodbye to his young wife and two babies.

On Monday, he finally was home. Around three dozen family and friends, including sons Alex and Frank Sandoval, greeted his return aboard Delta Air Lines Flight 2132....

 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, more than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died. At the end of ...
 
There are still 1,607 unaccounted for POW/MIAs from the Vietnam War which include 50 Green Berets in Laos. This is an issue that is near and dear to ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency tested the remains back in 2015. Since then, the families of the sailors decided to rebury the remains at ...
 
About 200 former prisoners of war have been invited to the event dubbed The ... 15, which is National POW/MIA Recognition Day, the POWs will leave ...
 
In 2015 the family provided the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) — the agency tasked with identifying unknown fallen soldiers— with ...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 7 July, 2017 07:48
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Marine Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Marine Sgt.. James

J. Hubert, accounted for on Sept. 1, 2016, will be buried July 15 in his

hometown.

 

Hubert, 22, of Duluth, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in World War

II.

 

His nephew, Jay Hagen, is available for interviews if you would like to

contact him at 218-491-1936.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Hubert on file.

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Hubert was assigned to Company H, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Hubert was killed on Nov. 21, 1943.

 

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in

the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Hubert's remains

were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board declared

Hubert's remains non-recoverable.

 

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified

DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the

remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the

battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

 

To identify Hubert's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA

Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial and Y-Short Tandem Repeat DNA

analysis, which matched a sister, a nephew and a cousin; as well as

circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental

comparisons, which matched Hubert's records.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for this recovery mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 7 July, 2017 07:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Minnesota Soldier Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor, 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Army Staff Sgt.
Gerald L. Jacobsen, accounted for on June 9, 2017, will be buried July 14 in
Fort Snelling, Minnesota. 

Jacobsen, 27, of Little Canada, Minnesota, was killed during World War II.
 
His nephew Brad Jacobsen is available for interviews if you would like to
contact him at 561-331-8872.

The Department of Defense has the attached phot of Jacobsen on file.

/////

On July 15, 1944, Jacobsen was a member of the 134th Infantry Regiment, 35th
Infantry Division, which participated in the siege of Saint-Lô, France.
Jacobsen, who was acting as an artillery spotter, was manning a mortar
command post near La Forge, approximately two kilometers northeast of
Saint-Lô, when he and another service member went missing.  The other
service member’s body was later found near the command post but Jacobsen’s
remains were not recovered and he was reported missing in action.  The U.S.
Army subsequently declared him deceased as of July 16, 1945.
 
On July 22, 1944, the remains of an individual, believed to be a member of
the 134th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division, were recovered from the
battlefields around Saint-Lô, and were interred at the La Cambe temporary
cemetery in France.  The remains were initially identified based on personal
letters found with the body.  However, further investigation showed that the
individual whose letters had been found was not a casualty.  Based on this
information, the remains were re-examined, designated as “Unknown X-481” and
reinterred.  Following additional unsuccessful attempts at identification,
Unknown X-481 was interred at U.S. Military Cemetery St. Laurent, now known
as Normandy American Cemetery.

In July 2016, Jacobsen’s family requested X-481 be disinterred based on the
presence of a laundry mark found on clothing recovered with the remains.
Researchers from DPAA worked closely with the historian of the 35th Infantry
Division to marshal evidence to support a recommendation to disinter X-481.
Scientific analysis of data on file also found sufficient evidence to
support a recommendation to disinter.  After receipt of approval, the
remains were disinterred from the Normandy American Ceremony on Nov. 21,
2016 and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.
 
To identify Jacobsen’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched a
brother and a sister, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, and
historical evidence.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,051 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II.  Jacobsen’s name is recorded on the Walls
of the Missing at an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with
the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his
name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 7 July, 2017 07:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Washington Airman Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Army Air Forces 1st

Lt. William J. Gray, accounted for on Jan 5. 2017, will be buried July 14 in

Kent, Washington. 

 

Gray, 21, of Kirkland, Washington, was killed during World War II.

 

His niece, Janet Bradshaw, is available for interviews if you would like to

contact her at 360-520-3561.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Gray on file.

 

/////

 

On April 16, 1945, Gray was a member of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th

Fighter Group and was the pilot of a single seat P-47D aircraft on a

dive-bombing mission in the vicinity of Lindau, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany.

His flight leader reported that after Gray strafed a truck, the left wing of

his aircraft dipped into the trees, causing it to crash. 

 

In October 1948, American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) investigators

located the crash site and were able to correlate the site to Gray's

aircraft based on the serial numbers of four machine guns recovered at the

site, which matched four machine guns on Gray's aircraft.  However, Gray's

remains were not recovered.

 

During investigations conducted in the Lindau area during a 2012 field

investigation, personnel from predecessor organizations of DPAA received

leads about Gray's loss.  Based on information gathered during eyewitness

interviews and local research, investigators recommended excavation of the

Lindau site for the possible remains of Gray.

 

In April 2016, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site and recovered

possible human remains.  The remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for

analysis.

 

To identify Gray's remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological

analysis, which matched his records, as well as historical research and

analysis.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
PORT CLINTON - A Gypsum man who served in World War II and died in 1942 is finally coming home. John Kovach will be buried Monday with full ...
 
SAN ANTONIO--- The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency just announced the remains of Army Corporal Frank L. Sandoval, a San Antonio native ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 July, 2017 13:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Louisiana Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Seaman 1st

Class Paul S. Raimond, accounted for on Feb. 23, 2017, will be buried July

11 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Raimond, 20, of Converse, Louisiana, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in Pearl Harbor.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted  by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Raimond on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Raimond was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Raimond. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Raimond.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Raimond's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched a nephew and a sister, as well as circumstantial evidence and

laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 76,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 July, 2017 13:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Seaman 1st

Class Monroe Temple, accounted for on March 22, 2017, will be buried July 12

in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Temple, 19, of Des Moines, Iowa, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in Pearl Harbor.

 

His family would like to defer all media inquiries to Lt. Cmdr Michael

Schmid, at (314) 524-9502.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Temple on file.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 July, 2017 13:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Seaman 1st

Class Monroe Temple, accounted for on March 22, 2017, will be buried July 12

in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Temple, 19, of Des Moines, Iowa, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in Pearl Harbor.

 

His family would like to defer all media inquiries to Lt. Cmdr Michael

Schmid, at (314) 524-9502.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Temple on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Temple was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Temple. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Temple.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Temple's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched a brother, a sister, and a niece, as well as circumstantial evidence

and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 July, 2017 13:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Louisiana Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Navy Seaman 1st

Class Paul S. Raimond, accounted for on Feb. 23, 2017, will be buried July

11 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Raimond, 20, of Converse, Louisiana, was killed in the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in Pearl Harbor.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted  by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Raimond on file.

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Raimond was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Raimond. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Raimond.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Raimond's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched a nephew and a sister, as well as circumstantial evidence and

laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 76,051 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 July, 2017 08:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Texas Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting agency has announced that Army Cpl. Frank L.

Sandoval, accounted for on May 3, 2017, will be buried July 11 in Fort Sam

Houston, Texas.

 

Sandoval, 20, of San Antonio, was captured during the Korean War.

 

His grandchildren, Mary Gibson and Alex Sandoval II, are available for

interviews at 817-992-5276 and 817-350-9774, respectively.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Sandoval on file.

 

/////

 

In early February 1951, Sandoval was a member of Battery A, 15th Field

Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit, as well as other

American units, were in operations supporting South Korean Army  attacks

against the Chinese People's  Volunteer Forces (CPFV) in an area known as

the Central Corridor in North Korea.  The support group, known as Support

Force 21 (SF21,) provided artillery fire support while located at

Changbong-ni.  On Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counter

offensive.  The South Koreans withdrew, leaving SF21 in Changbong-ni.  As

the support group withdrew south toward Wonju, they endured continual

attacks.  Sandoval was reported missing in action on Feb. 13, 1951, when he

did not arrive with the unit in Wonju. 

 

Several returning American prisoners of war reported that Sandoval had been

captured by the CPVF and had died in July 1951 while being held at Camp 3, a

prisoner of war camp near Changsong, North Korea.  Based on this

information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on July 7, 1951.

 

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war

dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory."  All remains recovered in

Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit

for analysis.  The unidentified remains were interred as unknowns at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the

"Punchbowl."  One set of remains was designated "Unknown X-14211."

 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that

X-14211 could likely be identified.  After receiving approval, X-14211 was

disinterred on Jan. 9, 2017 and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Sandoval's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory

analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison

analysis, all which matched Sandoval's records; as well as circumstantial

evidence.

 

Today, 7,741 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The last time Mary Ocheske and Ethel Smith saw their brother was shortly before he was shipped to the Philippines to fight the Japanese in World War II.

After more than 70 years, the three siblings will be reunited as the formerly unidentified remains of their brother, John Kovach, Jr., will be returned.

 
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, 73,052 World War II service members are still missing. The agency estimates that 26,000 ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Byron Nelson will be interred Saturday near Primghar ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 June, 2017 12:58
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Sowell)

Army Sgt. Richard G. Sowell, killed during World War II, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1235086/soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-sowell/

In July 1944, Sowell was a member of 295th Joint Assault Signal Company,
Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 106th Infantry, when American forces
participated in the battle for the island Saipan, part of a larger operation
to secure the Mariana Islands. Sowell, a spotter for the signal company, was
last known to be in the vicinity of Hill 721 on the island of Saipan, which
was under heavy attack by the Japanese on July 6-7, 1944. On the morning of
July 7, the commanding officer of 106th Infantry reported that Sowell was
killed in action.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 June, 2017 12:57
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For (Wipfli)

Army Pfc. Gerald F. Wipfli, missing from World War II, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1235077/soldier
-missing-from-world-war-ii-accounted-for-wipfli/

In early November 1944, Wipfli was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion,
112th Infantry, when his unit was engaged in intense combat against German
forces in the town of Schmidt, Germany, within the Hürtgen Forest. Due to
chaotic fighting, 112th Infantry officers were not able to accurately report
the status of each soldier, and it took several days for Company I to gain
accountability of their casualties. Wipfli was among 33 soldiers listed as
missing in action from his company. No surviving members of his unit had
information on his fate, and he was reported missing in action on Nov. 4,
1944.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 June, 2017 12:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured During Korean War Accounted For (Harris)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Sgt. 1st Class Max E. Harris, captured during the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1235060/soldier
-captured-during-korean-war-accounted-for-harris/

In late November 1950, Harris was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st
Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700
South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT),
which deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was
attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. The American forces
withdrew south with the Chinese attacks continuing. By December 6, the U.S.
Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining
soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because
Harris could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he
was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950.

A returning American prisoner reported that Harris had been captured and
died while en route to POW Camp 3 in September 1951.  Based on this
information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on Sept. 30, 1951.

Interment services are pending

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,  or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 June, 2017 11:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that Army Technician 4th
Grade John Kovach, Jr., accounted for on April 7, 2017, will be buried July
10 in Port Clinton, Ohio.

Kovach, 21, of Gypsum, Ohio, was missing from World War II.

His sister, Mary Ocheske, of Toledo, Ohio, is available for interviews if
you would like to contact her at 419-693-7167.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Kovach on file. 

/////

On Dec. 8, 1941, Kovach was assigned to Company C, 192nd Tank Battalion,
when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense fighting
continued until May 6, 1942, when Corregidor fell and American forces
surrendered. 

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner;
including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to
Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan
on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Kovach was among those reported
captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to
the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during
the remaining years of the war.

Kovach was admitted to the Cabanatuan Camp station hospital for illness,
where he died on Nov. 19, 1942.  According to prison records, Kovach was
buried along with 13 fellow prisoners in a local camp cemetery in
Cabanatuan, Grave 717. 


Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel
exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to
a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again
exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them.
Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive
commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of
the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains
were reburied as unknowns in the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC)
cemetery at Fort McKinley in Manila, Philippines (known as Manila American
Cemetery and Memorial.)

In 2014, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume ten graves
associated with the Cabanatuan Common Grave 717.  On August 28, 2014, the
remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for identification. 

To identify Kovach's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched two sisters, as well as circumstantial evidence, dental comparisons,
and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

DPAA is appreciative of the American Battle Monuments Commission's
partnership in this mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war. Currently there are 73,051 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II. Kovach's name is recorded on the Walls of
the Missing at an ABMC site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette
will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 June, 2017 09:58
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Punnell)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Reserve Lt. William Q. Punnell, killed during World War II, has now
been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1234417/sailor-
killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-punnell/


On July 25, 1944, Punnell was the acting commanding officer of the VF-14
Fighter Squadron, departing from the aircraft carrier USS Wasp in his F6F-3
"Hellcat" with several other aircraft on a strafing mission against Japanese
targets on the islands of the Republic of Palau. The mission was to strafe
the Babelthaup (now Babeldaob) Airbase and the two Arakabesan Seaplane
bases. Punnell's aircraft encountered intense antiaircraft fire over the
islands of Palau. His Hellcat was in the lead position when the tail of the
plane was seen taking a direct hit. He crashed approximately 300 feet from
the northern seaplane base, and his aircraft sank on impact. The other
pilots on the mission did not witness Punnell bail out from his aircraft.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 29 June, 2017 11:19
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured During Korean War Accounted For (Skates)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Clarence R. Skates, captured during the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1232999/soldier
-captured-in-the-korean-war-accounted-for-skates/

In November 1950, Skates was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st
Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when the division
suffered heavy losses between the towns of Kunu-ri and Sunchon, North Korea.
Skates' regiment suffered many casualties, and he was reported missing in
action on Nov. 30, 1950, after his unit's defensive positions were overrun
by units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF). 

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,  or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 29 June, 2017 11:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From The Korean War Accounted For (Housekeeper)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Master Sgt. George R. Housekeeper, Jr., missing from the Korean War,
has now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1233011/soldier
-missing-from-the-korean-war-accounted-for-housekeeper/

In late November 1950, Housekeeper was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion,
31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and
700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team
(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it
was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. The American forces
withdrew south with the Chinese attacks continuing. By December 6, the U.S.
Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining
soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because
Housekeeper could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle,
he was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,  or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 29 June, 2017 11:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From The Korean War Accounted For (Hill)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Charlie H. Hill, missing from the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1233032/soldier
-missing-from-the-korean-war-accounted-for-hill/

In late November 1950, Hill was a member of Battery D, 15th Anti-aircraft
Artillery Automatic Weapons Self-propelled Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.
Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the
31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin
Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of
Chinese forces.  American forces withdrew south with the Chinese continued
to attack. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500
wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or
killed in enemy territory. Because Hill could not be accounted for by his
unit after reaching Hagaru-ri, he was reported missing in action on Dec. 2,
1950.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,  or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 29 June, 2017 11:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured In The Korean War Accounted For (Mullins)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Thomas H. Mullins, captured during the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1233045/soldier
-captured-in-the-korean-war-accounted-for-mullins/

On Nov. 2, 1950, Mullins was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th
Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.  He was reported missing in action
on Nov. 2, 1950, following combat between the Chinese People's Volunteer
Forces (CPVF) and his regiment, in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea.
Approximately 600 men were killed, captured or missing.  Mullins was
subsequently declared missing in action. 


At the end of the war, during "Operation Big Switch," where all remaining
prisoners of war were returned, former prisoners were interviewed.  One
reported that Mullins died while being held in POW Camp 5, Pyokdong, North
Korea.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,  or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Hughes and Dwyer received assistance from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in their search for Stanley's fate. JPAC excavated the ...
 
In 2015 the POW/MIA agency exhumed remains associated with the USS Oklahoma for analysis. Scientists from the agency and Armed Forces DNA ...
... Earl R. Melton, a 24-year-old sailor from Lakewood stationed on a battleship at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, was one of the first to die the day World War II began for the United States.
 
~~~~~
PRIMGHAR, Iowa (KCRG-TV9) - The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

... been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Friday.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

His remains were found in North Korea in 2000, but weren't positively identified as Sutton's until this month by the POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency reports Cpl. Sutton, 24, was fighting North Korean forces in 1950. But Chinese forces began helping North Korea.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 23 June, 2017 08:01
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Airman Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Byron H. Nelson, 28, of Primghar, Iowa, missing
from World War II, has now been accounted for.

He will be buried July 1 in his hometown.

His nephew, Ronne G. Reifenstahl, is available for interviews if you would
like to contact him at 425-275-1711.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Nelson on file.  Nelson
is front row, center.

/////

On April 25, 1944, Nelson was a member of the 721st Bomb Squadron, 450th
Bomb Group, 15th Air Force, and was the nose gunner aboard an American B-24G
Liberator bomber.  While flying from Manduria, Italy, to a target area near
Varese, Italy, three aircraft became separated from the formation due to
dense clouds.  Nelson's aircraft was one the three that disappeared.  It was
later learned that eight of the 10 people in his aircraft parachuted from
the bomber after being attacked by German fighters.  Six crewmen were able
to successfully evade capture and two were captured.  A captured crewman was
told by a German interrogator that two crewmen perished in the crash, one
being Nelson. 

On Sept. 9, 1947, the American Graves Registration Service disinterred
remains from a cemetery near Fognano, Italy, where they were reportedly
buried by local residents following the crash.  The AGRS then moved his
remains temporarily to the U.S. Military Cemetery at Mirandola on Sept. 10
as "Mirandola Unknown X-190."

On July 24, 1948, the remains were disinterred for attempted identification.
The remains were unable to be identified and were re-interred in the
Florence American Cemetery on May 26, 1949. 

DPAA researchers made a historical association between Mirandola Unknown
X-190 and Nelson's incident based on wartime records written by the Italian
Military Police in Brisighella, as well as information gathered during field
investigations with local Italian citizens.  Due to the historical evidence
and newly available technology, the remains were disinterred in August 2015.

To identify Nelson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a
grand nephew, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched
his records, and circumstantial evidence.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war. Currently there are 73,052 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 23 June, 2017 07:48
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: West Virginia Soldier Accounted For From Korean
War

Dear Editor,

Army Sgt. James W. Sharp, 24, of Mannington, West Virginia, missing from the
Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

He will be buried June 29 in Grafton, West Virginia.

His grand-niece, Michelle Hawes, is available for interviews if you would
like to contact her at 304-946-9097.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Sharp on file.

/////

In late November, 1950, Sharp was a member of Battery B, 57th Field
Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division.
Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the
31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin
Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of
Chinese forces.  The American forces withdrew south with the Chinese attacks
continuing.  By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500
wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or
killed in enemy territory.  Because Sharp could not be accounted for by his
unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec.
6, 1950.

Sharp's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated
Americans reported Sharp as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of
evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Feb. 17, 1954.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American
remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war,
administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea
complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and
October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned.
However, Sharp's remains were not included and he was declared
non-recoverable.

During the 25th Joint Recovery Operation in 2001, recovery teams conducted
operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County,
North Korea, based on information provided by two North Korean witnesses.
The site was approximately one kilometer from the 31st RCT's defensive
perimeter.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible
human remains of at least seven individuals.

To identify Sharp's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA
Identification Laboratory used circumstantial and anthropological evidence,
including dental and chest radiograph comparison, as well as DNA analysis,
including mitochondrial DNA, which matched a brother and a sister.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 June, 2017 08:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Oklahoma Airman From World War II Accounted For

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Air Forces Pvt.
Harold S. Hirschi, 29, of Oklahoma City.

He will be buried June 28 in Andersonville, Georgia.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hirschi on file.

/////

On Dec. 8, 1941, Hirschi was assigned to Headquarters Squadron, 19th
Bombardment Group, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands.
Intense fighting continued until May 6, 1942, when American forces on
Corregidor Island surrendered. 

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members from Bataan and Corregidor
were taken prisoner; including many who were forced to endure the Bataan
Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps.  Hirschi was
among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were
eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished
in this camp during the remaining years of the war.

Hirschi was admitted to the Cabanatuan Camp station hospital for illness,
where he died on Nov. 19, 1942.  According to prison records, Hirschi was
buried along with 13 fellow prisoners in a local camp cemetery in
Cabanatuan, Grave 717. 

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel
exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to
a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again
exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them.
Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive
commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of
the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains
were reburied as unknowns in a permanent American Battle Monuments
Commission (ABMC) cemetery at Fort McKinley in Manila, Philippines (known as
Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.)

In 2014, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume ten graves
associated with the Cabanatuan Common Grave 717.  On August 28, 2014, the
remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for identification. 

To identify Hirschi's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched two cousins, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory
analysis, to include anthropological analysis, which matched his records.
DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their
partnership in this mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war. Currently there are 73,052 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II, and approximately 26,000 are assessed as
possible recoverable.  Hirschi's name is recorded on the Walls of the
Missing at the Manila American Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from
WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been
accounted for.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 June, 2017 08:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New Jersey Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Machinist's
Mate 1st Class Earl R.  Melton, 24, of Lakewood, New Jersey.

He will be buried June 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His niece, Barbara Rux, of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact her at 262-567-4165.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Melton on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Melton was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Melton. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Melton.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Melton's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA
Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial, Y-chromosome Short Tandem
Repeat and autosomal DNA analysis, which matched a niece and four nephews,
as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include
dental comparisons, which matched Melton's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,052 service members
(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

And it took 9 years to go back -  WHY?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 June, 2017 07:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Newell)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pvt. Archie W. Newell has now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1217980/marine-
missing-from-world-war-ii-identified-newell/

In November 1943, Newell was assigned to Company C, 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd
Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small
island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to
secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa,
approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were
wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Newell was killed on
the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Interment services are pending.For more information about DPAA, visit
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 June, 2017 07:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (James)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pfc. Ray James has now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1217984/marine-
missing-from-world-war-ii-identified-james/

In November 1943, James was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine
Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese
resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert
Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense
fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and
more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.
James was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Interment services are pending.   

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 20 June, 2017 11:11
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Missing From World War II Identified (Betchley)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. George W. Betchley, missing from World War II, has
now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1219772/airman-
missing-from-world-war-ii-identified-betchley/

On March 22, 1945, Betchley was a member of the 429th Bombardment Squadron,
2nd Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force, serving as a navigator on a B-17G
Flying Fortress, carrying a crew of ten on a bombing mission targeting the
Ruhland oil refinery near Schwarzheide, Germany.  The aircraft crashed in
southwest Poland after two of its engines and the left wing were reportedly
damaged by German anti-aircraft fire, and German fighters.  The pilot and
several crewmembers parachuted out, but only the pilot and co-pilot
survived.  The other eight crewmembers were not recovered following the
crash.  Betchley was declared missing in action as of March 22, 1945, but
his status was later amended to killed in action.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 20 June, 2017 09:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Identified (Murray)

U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. George B. Murray how now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1219541/marine-
killed-during-world-war-ii-identified-murray/

In November 1943, Murray was assigned to Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd
Marines Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese
resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert
Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense
fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and
more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.
Murray was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The support from the Republic of Kiribati was vital to the success of this
recovery.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 20 June, 2017 09:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Atkins)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Albert E. Atkins, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1219532/soldier
-missing-from-korean-war-identified-atkins/

On May 23, 1951, Atkins was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 187th
Airborne Infantry Regiment, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, when his
unit was attacking enemy forces near Mae-Bong, South Korea. The regiment's
mission was to secure Hill 911, and as the company prepared to assault the
hill, Atkins and two other soldiers from his company were reported missing
in action.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 17:23
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Texas Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Billie J.
Jimerson, 19, of Kerens, Texas.

He will be buried June 23 in Portland, Oregon.

His niece, Patty Miles, of Portland, is available for interviews if you
would like to contact her at 708-257-2310.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Jimerson on file.

/////

In late November, 1950, Jimerson was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,
24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when his unit engaged with
opposing forces near Anju, North Korea.  He was reported missing in action
as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

Returning American prisoners of war reported that Jimerson was captured by
the enemy, died in captivity and was buried at Camp 5, Pyoktong, North
Korea. 

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of
war cemetery at Camp 5 were sent to the Central Identification Unit in Japan
for attempted identification and further processing. This set of remains was
designated X-14400, and was determined unidentifiable in November 1955.  The
remains were transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in
Honolulu and interred as a Korean War Unknown.

In February 2014 the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency requested the
disinterment of Unknown X-14400 after a thorough historical and scientific
analysis indicated  that the remains could likely be identified. In June
2014 after receiving approval, X-14400 was disinterred from the National
Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific and accessioned into the laboratory.

To identify Jimerson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used circumstantial and anthropological evidence,
including dental and chest radiograph comparison, as well as DNA analysis,
including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which matched a sister and a nephew.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 17:47
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Texas Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Seaman 1st
Class George A. Coke, 18, of Arlington, Texas.

He will be buried June 24 in his hometown.

His nephew, Hugh Coke, of Georgia, is available for interviews if you would
like to contact him at 678-642-7361.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Coke on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Coke was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Coke. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Coke.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Coke's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) which matched a cousin
and Y chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched a nephew, as well as
circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental
comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched Coke's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,054 service members
(approximately 34,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 18:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: UPDATE: LOCAL CONNECTION: North Dakota Sailor Accounted For From
World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Gunner's Mate
1st Class Arthur C. Neuenschwander, 33, of Fessenden, North Dakota.

He will be buried June 24 in his hometown.

His nephew, Bruce Johnson, of Prescott, Arizona, is available for interviews

if you would like to contact him at 860-380-7174.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Neuenschwander on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Neuenschwander was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was
moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Neuenschwander.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration  Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two
cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at
Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the
identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS
subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National
Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu.  In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be
identified as non-recoverable, including Neuenschwander.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Neuenschwander's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed
Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis,
which matched a brother, a sister and two nephews, as well as circumstantial
evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,054 service members (approximately
34,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from
World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website

at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call
(703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
Art Jackson, a Boisean awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, said he hasn't forgotten his fallen colleagues, but fears many of us have. “Charles ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 11:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For (Jacobsen)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Staff Sgt. Gerald L. Jacobsen, missing from World War II, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1216583/soldier
-missing-from-world-war-ii-accounted-for-jacobsen/

On July 15, 1944, Jacobsen was a member of the 134th Infantry Regiment, 35th
Infantry Division, which participated in the siege of Saint-Lô, France.
Jacobsen, who was acting as an artillery spotter, was manning a mortar
compound post near La Forge, approximately two kilometers northeast of
Saint-Lô, when he and another service member went missing. The other service
member’s body was later found near the command post but Jacobsen’s remains
were not recovered and he was reported missing in action. The U.S. Army
subsequently declared him deceased as of July 16, 1945.

In 2016, based on a family request, Unknown X-481, possibly correlated to
Jacobsen, were disinterred for analysis.

DNA and laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 17:03
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Georgia Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Leslie R.
Sutton, 24, of Rochelle, Georgia.

He will be buried June 14 in his hometown.

His niece Vivian White, of Loganville, Georgia, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact her at 770-923-3023.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Sutton on file.

/////

In late October 1950, Sutton was a member of Battery C, 99th Field Artillery
Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, when his unit received orders to take over
positions occupied by the 11th and 12th Republic of Korea Army Regiments in
the northwest region of North Korea, in the vicinity of Unsan.  Within hours
of establishing the command post, elements of the supported unit, the 8th
Cavalry Regiment, encountered heavy fighting with the Chinese People's
Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  In danger of being overwhelmed by the CPVF, the
regiment received an order to withdraw southeast of Unsan, Nov. 1, 1950.
Many of the men were captured or killed by the CPVF, and after several days
of searching adjacent units and hospitals, Sutton was reported missing in
action as of Nov. 2, 1950.

During the war, Sutton was not listed on any CPVF or [North] Korean People's
Army (KPA) Prisoners of War (POWs) lists. Additionally, no returning
American prisoners reported his capture.  . Based on that information, the
U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953. 

In July 2000, a joint U.S. and KPA recovery team conducted a Joint Recovery
Operation at a site near Hwaong-ri Village, Unsan County, North Korea, based
on information provided by a North Korean Witness.  During the excavation,
the team recovered military equipment, personal effects, and human remains.
The remains were accessioned to the DPAA laboratory on July 24, 2000.

To identify Sutton's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and
autosomal (au-STR) DNA analysis, which matched a brother, as well as dental
and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial
evidence.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 June, 2017 13:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION:

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Pvt. Gene J.
Appleby, 30, of Columbus Ohio.

He will be buried June 22 in Coshocton, Ohio.

His nephew, Eugene Simonds, of Panama City, Florida, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at 850-785-7720.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Appleby on file.

/////

On Sept. 17, 1944, Appleby was a member of Company A, 508th Parachute
Infantry Regiment, as part of Operation Market Garden to advance from the
Netherlands into Germany.  The regiment was tasked with landing at Drop Zone
"T," north of Groesbeek, Netherlands.  Appleby successfully jumped and was
seen on the ground by members of the unit.  However, as the soldiers rallied
to move toward their objective, Appleby was struck by enemy fire.  The Army
listed Appleby as missing in action as of Sept 17, 1944. After reviewing his
case, the War Department found no further information and issued a
presumptive finding of death as of Sept. 18, 1945.
 
On Sept. 8, 2011, the Royal Netherlands Army Recovery and Identification
Unit (RIU) was notified by the Groesbeek Police of possible human remains
found at the Groenendaal Farm by local residents.  Officials conducted an
excavation and recovered possible human remains and material evidence.  The
remains were transferred to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, (now
DPAA,) for identification.

Historians from DPAA working on cases of missing Americans from Operation
Market Garden received valuable recovery information from the RIU and
traveled to the original recovery site with the local researchers who
originally found the remains.  With this information, the DPAA historians
established a list of individuals whose circumstances of loss and last known
location matched the remains.  Appleby was among the possible candidates. 
 
To identify Appleby's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) which matched a niece and
Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched a cousin; laboratory
analysis, including dental and anthropological analysis, which matched
Appleby's records; and circumstantial evidence.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,054 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://mentalfloss.com/article/501825/two-b-25-bombers-went-missing-world-war-ii-have-been-found

The remains of two B-25 bombers that disappeared from the skies over 70 years ago have been located in the waters off Papua New Guinea. IFL Science reports that the planes were discovered by Project Recover, an organization dedicated to tracking down U.S. aircraft that crashed into the sea during World War II....

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 12 June, 2017 08:23
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Edward
Pool, 22, of Paso Robles, California.

He will be buried June 19 in Portland, Oregon.

His nephew, Ed Truax, is available for interviews if you would like to
contact him at 503-577-9644.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Pool on file.

/////

In late November 1950, Pool was a member of 31st Heavy Mortar Company, 31st
Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700
South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT),
which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was
engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 6, the U.S. Army
had evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining
soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Because
Pool could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was
reported missing in action as of Nov. 30, 1950.

Pool's name appeared on a list provided by the Chinese People's Volunteer
Forces and Korean People's Army as a prisoner of war.  Following the war,
one returning American prisoner reported that Pool had died in January 1951.
Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Jan.
31, 1951.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned 208 boxes of commingled human
remains to the United States, which we determined to contain the remains of
at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean
documents included in the repatriation indicate that some of the remains
were recovered from the vicinity of where Pool was believed to have died.

To identify Pool's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and
autosomal (auDNA) DNA analysis, which matched a brother and a niece, as well
as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial
evidence.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 June, 2017 11:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured in World War II Identified (Borders)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Edward L. Borders has now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1209206/soldier
-captured-during-the-korean-war-accounted-for-borders/


In early February 1951, Borders was a member of Dog Battery, 82nd
Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons), 2nd Infantry
Division, when American units began supporting South Korean Army attacks
against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area
known as the Central Corridor in North Korea.  Dog Battery was part of a
group known as Support Force 21 (SF21) and provided artillery fire support
for the South Korean Army during its attack north on Hongch'on.  On the
evening of Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counter offensive
against the South Koreans, who were forced to withdraw, leaving Borders'
unit and the rest of SF21 behind at Changbong-ni.  The SF 21 marched south
along Route 29, fighting through ambushes and roadblocks, to Hoengsong and
eventually to the city of Wonju.  Borders was reported missing in action as
of Feb. 13, 1951 when he did not report with his unit in Wonju.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes
of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered
during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of
at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war.  Of the 208 boxes,
14 were reported to have been recovered from Ryongpho-ri, Suan County, North
Hwanghae Province, North Korea.

DNA and laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 June, 2017 08:53
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Montana Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Sgt. 1st Class
Harold P. Haugland, 22, of Belgrade, Montana. 

He will be buried June 17 in Bozeman, Montana.

His nephew, Clayton Haugland, also of Bozeman, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact him at 541-729-2500.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Haugland on file.

/////

In late November, 1950, Haugland was a member of Company D, 15th
Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately
2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental
Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North
Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By
early December, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service
members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy
territory.  Because Haugland could not be accounted for by his unit at the
end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

Haugland's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning
American POWs reported him as a prisoner of war.  The U.S. Army declared him
deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover
American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after
the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North
Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September
and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were
returned. However, Haugland's remains were not included and he was declared
non-recoverable.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted
operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, in the vicinity of
Twikkae Village, North Korea, based on information provided by a Korean
witness.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human
remains of at least five individuals.

To identify Haugland's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used circumstantial and anthropological evidence, as
well as DNA analysis, including mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome
(Y-STR) DNA, which matched two brothers.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 June, 2017 08:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New Jersey Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Pfc. Walter F.
Piper, 21, of Williamstown, New Jersey.

He will be buried June 17 in his hometown.

His friend, Ralph M. Delaney, Jr., also of Williamstown, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at 856-261-5170.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Piper on file.

/////

In February 1951, Piper was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters
Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic
of Korea Army attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces
(CPVF) in the village of Hoengsong, an area known as the Central Corridor in
South Korea.  After enduring sustained enemy attacks, the American units
withdrew to Wonju, South Korea.  It was during this withdrawal that Piper
was reported missing, as of Feb. 13, 1951.

On Dec. 26, 1951, Piper's name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and
Korean People's Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their
custody.  Two returning American prisoners of war reported that Piper had
died while a prisoner at the Suan Prisoner of War Camp Complex in North
Korea.  Based off of this information, the Army declared him deceased as of
June 18, 1951.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes
of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the
remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. On June
24, 1991, the DPRK turned over 11 boxes of remains believed to be
unaccounted-for Americans from the war. 

 To identify Piper's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome short
tandem repeat (Y-SYR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched a
brother, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,745 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US)
[mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 June, 2017 08:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Missouri Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Fireman 1st
Class Charles W. Thompson, 19, of Weaubleau, Missouri.

He will be buried June 17 in Butler, Missouri.

His niece, Corine Bubier, also of Weaubleau, is willing to speak with media
if you would like to contact her at 951-314-0991.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Thompson on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Thompson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Thompson. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identities of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The
AGRS subsequently buried the unknowns in 46 plots at the National Memorial
Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In
October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified
as non-recoverable, including Thompson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Thompson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched two nephews and a niece, as well as circumstantial evidence and
laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,057 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Sixty-six years after a soldier died as a prisoner of war during the Korean War, his remains are coming home to South Jersey. The Defense POW/MIA .

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Friday that it had identified the remains of Army Pvt. Walter Piper of Williamstown, Gloucester County, New Jersey.....

Soldier Captured During The Korean War Accounted For (Borders)

By | June 09, 2017

2
 
 
 

Army Cpl. Edward L. Borders has now been accounted for.



 

In early February 1951, Borders was a member of Dog Battery, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons), 2nd Infantry Division, when American units began supporting South Korean Army attacks against units of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central Corridor in North Korea. Dog Battery was part of a group known as Support Force 21 (SF21) and provided artillery fire support for the South Korean Army during its attack north on Hongch’on. On the evening of Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counter offensive against the South Koreans, who were forced to withdraw, leaving Borders’ unit and the rest of SF21 behind at Changbong-ni. The SF 21 marched south along Route 29, fighting through ambushes and roadblocks, to Hoengsong and eventually to the city of Wonju. Borders was reported missing in action as of Feb. 13, 1951 when he did not report with his unit in Wonju.



 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. Of the 208 boxes, 14 were reported to have been recovered from Ryongpho-ri, Suan County, North Hwanghae Province, North Korea.



 

DNA and laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.



 

Interment services are pending.

 

Sailor Missing From Vietnam War Identified (Goodwin)

By | June 03, 2017

8
 
 
 

U.S. Navy Cmdr. Charles B. Goodwin has now been accounted for.



 

On Sept. 8, 1965, Goodwin was the pilot of an RF-8A aircraft, assigned to Detachment D, VPF-63, CVW-15, when he launched from the USS Coral Sea, for a combat photo mission over North Vietnam (now Socialist Republic of Vietnam.) At the time of the early-morning flight, numerous intense thunderstorms were reported between the USS Coral Sea and the North Vietnam. Fifteen minutes after launching, Goodwin reported that he had encountered thunderstorms en route to the target area. That was the last radio transmission from him. Search efforts over the target area and adjacent coastal waters were unsuccessful, no emergency radio signals were heard and no aircraft wreckage was sighted. Goodwin was declared missing in action as of Sept. 8, 1965.



 

In February 1988, a Vietnamese refugee provided information regarding the location of possible human remains and material evidence, including a military identification card for Goodwin. Between April 1993 and December 2016, multiple attempts were made by the Vietnamese Office for Seeking Missing Persons (VNOSMP) and Joint U.S./Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) teams to locate the crash site and remains of the pilot, without success. In December 2016, a Joint Forensic Review team received possible human remains that had been in the possession of a Vietnamese national. The remains were 
sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.



 

DNA and laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.



 

The support from the government of Vietnam was vital to the success of this recovery.



 

Interment services are pending.



 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

 
Lt. Kristen Duus, a defense department spokeswoman for the POW/MIA Accounting Office in Washington, D.C., said in 1954 North Korea sent to Japan ...

And now that the remains of the 1949 Glassboro graduate, Army Pfc. Walter F. Piper, were conclusively identified in April, they will be coming home for a June 17 burial....

Pearl Harbor victim finally comes home

Port Huron – — Local folks are planning a big welcome Saturday for someone they never met.   Law enforcement agencies are vying to escort Freddie Jones from the airport. Veteran groups want to be part of a ceremony celebrating his life. Average Joes want to attend the homecoming.   The reason none of them know Jones? He died in 1941. He was a Navy machinist killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor....

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2017/05/19/pearl-harbor-freddie-jones-port-huron/101905488/

A Wisconsin lawyer filed a lawsuit in federal court in Texas seeking a judge's order to compel the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to exhume ...
-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From Korean War
Date: Mon, 22 May 2017 13:55:09 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Pfc. Everett
Johnson, 21, of Cincinnati.

He will be buried May 29 in Madisonville, Ohio.

His niece, Patricia Armacost, of Humble, Texas, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact her at 859-620-7151.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Johnson on file.

/////

On Sept. 3, 1950, Johnson was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division located near Taegu, South Korea.
Johnson's company was cut off by enemy penetrations and withdrew to join the
rest of the battalion.  During the course of the enemy attack, Johnson was
killed by enemy fire. 

In May 1951, an unidentified set of remains, previously recovered from a
mass grave near Pultang, South Korea, was buried in the Tanggok United
Nations Military Cemetery and labeled "Unknown X-1072."  No identification
of X-1072 could be made, and the remains were interred in the National
Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii as an Unknown

In Dec. 2014, the Department of Defense approved the disinterment of
"Unknown X-1072." The remains were disinterred May 16, 2016 were sent to the
laboratory for analysis. 


To identify Johnson's remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial and
anthropological evidence, as well as dental and chest radiograph comparison
analysis, which matched his records.

Today, 7,747 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New York Sailor Accounted For From Vietnam War
Date: Mon, 22 May 2017 13:51:27 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Pfc. Thomas C.
Stagg, 21 of Jefferson, Alabama.

He will be buried  May 29 in Birmingham, Alabama.

His nephew, Larry Leonard, of Auburn, Alabama, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact him at 334-444-9976.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Stagg on file. 

/////

On Nov. 29, 1950, Stagg was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 187th
Airborne Infantry Regiment, on a reconnaissance patrol.  The patrol
encountered an enemy ambush near Hajoyang-ni, North Korea.  During the
battle, Stagg was killed in action and his body could not be recovered.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned 208 boxes of commingled human
remains to the United States, which we determined to contain the remains of
at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean
documents included in the repatriation indicate that some of the remains
were recovered from the vicinity where Stagg was believed to have died.

To identify Stagg's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a niece and nephew, as well as anthropological analysis and dental
analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,747 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 May, 2017 09:38
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Colorado Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Coxswain Verne
F. Knipp, 22 of, Salida, Colorado. 

He will be buried May 26 in Auburn, California.

His niece, Lory Claiborne, and his nephew, Lyle Sharp, are available for
interviews if you would like to contact them at 530-906-0241 or
916-712-1532, respectively.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Knipp on file.
/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Knipp was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Knipp.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of
the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Knipp.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Knipp's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y chromosome (Y-STR) and
autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched two sisters, a nephew and a
niece, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to
include dental comparisons, which matched Knipp's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,059 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 May, 2017 09:54
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Utah Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Musician 1st
Class Elliot D. Larsen, 25, of Monroe, Utah.

He will be buried May 26 in his hometown.

His niece, Lisa King, is available for interviews if you would like to
contact her at 435-979-5464.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Larsen on file.

/////
On Dec. 7, 1941, Larsen was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Larsen.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.


In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Larsen.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Larsen's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a sister and niece, as well as circumstantial evidence and
laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,059 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 May, 2017 10:22
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Minnesota Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Fireman 3rd
Class Glaydon I.C. Iverson, 24, of Emmons, Minnesota.

He will be buried May 27 in Lake Mills, Iowa.

His nephew, Gary Iverson, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at 505-780-8171.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Iverson on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Iverson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Iverson.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.


In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Iverson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Iverson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched two cousins, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory
analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Iverson's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,059 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Family finds closure with return of remains of MIA Korean War soldier

Las Vegas Review-Journal

Family finds closure with return of remains of MIA Korean War soldier .... She also praised the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for doing “such a ...

 

Unidentified remains of a U.S. serviceman were recovered in December 1950 from a grave near Chinuju-Hadong Highway. They were eventually transferred to the National Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, where they were exhumed last year and identified as Quintana’s through DNA and dental analysis. 

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lane)
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 12:07:02 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Staff Sgt. Michael Aiello, missing from World War II, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182423/soldier
-missing-from-world-war-ii-identified-aiello/


In September 1944, Aiello was a member of Company G, 401st Glider Infantry
Regiment (GIR), which was attached to the 325th GIR for Operation Market
Garden. American and German forces battled in a dense forest in the
Netherlands, known as Kiekberg Woods. The battle, which lasted four days,
was comprised of ferocious attacks and counterattacks by both sides and
resulted in many American losses, including Aiello.

On May 31, 2016, based on research and analysis, remains possibly
corresponding to Aiello were disinterred from the Ardennes American Cemetery
and sent to the DPAA Laboratory for identification.


Laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

Aiello's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an American Battle
Monuments Commission site along with other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be
placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lane)
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 12:07:02 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Army Cpl. Richard Seadore, missing from the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182323/soldier
-missing-from-korean-war-identified-seadore/



In December 1950, Seadore was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th
Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, when all units of the United Nations
Command were moving south after units of the Chinese People's Volunteer
Forces (CPVF) staged mass attacks during their Second Phase Offensive.  On
Dec. 14, the Regiment sent out a reconnaissance patrol.  While Seadore's
company did not participate in the patrol, they remained in defensive
positions north of Uijong-bu, South Korea.  The CPVF attacked and penetrated
the company's defensive line.  As the unit prepared to move the following
day, Seadore could not be located and was he was reported absent without
leave (AWOL.)  His status was later amended to missing in action.

Remains were handed over to the agency on May 28, 1992 and sent to the
Central Identification Laboratory (now DPAA) for analysis.


Recent technology advancements in DNA and laboratory analysis were used in
the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lane)
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 12:07:02 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Army Cpl. Glen E. Kritzwiser, missing from the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182332/soldier
-missing-from-korean-war-identified-kritzwiser/


In early February 1951, Kritzwiser was a member of Battery C, 15th Field
Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when American units began
supporting Republic of Korea Army (ROKA) attacks against units of the
Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central
Corridor in North Korea. The support group, known as SF21, provided
artillery fire support for the ROKA during its attack north on Hongch'on. On
the evening of Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counterattack
against the ROKA. The ROKA withdrew, leaving Kritzwiser's unit and the rest
of SF21 behind at Changbong-ni. The SF 21 marched south along Route 29,
fighting through ambushes and roadblocks, to Hoengsong and eventually to the
city of Wonju. Kritzwiser was reported missing in action as of Feb. 13, 1951
when he did not arrive to report in Wonju.

On January 7, 2017, based on research and analysis, remains possibly
corresponding to Kritzwiser were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory
for analysis.

Laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lane)
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 12:07:02 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Army Cpl. Frank L. Sandoval, missing from the Korean War, has now been
accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182330/soldier
-missing-from-korean-war-identified-sandoval/


In early February 1951, Sandoval was a member of Battery A, 15th Field
Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit, as well as other
American units, were in operations supporting Republic of Korea Army (ROKA)
attacks against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPFV) in an area
known as the Central Corridor in North Korea. The support group, known as
Support Force 21 (SF21,) provided artillery fire support while located at
Changbong-ni. On Feb. 11, 1951, the CPVF launched a massive counter
offensive. The ROKA withdrew, leaving SF21 in Changbong-ni. As the support
group withdrew south toward Wonju, they endured continual attacks. Sandoval
was reported missing in action as of Feb. 13, 1951, when he did not arrive
with the unit in Wonju.

On January 9, 2017, based on research and analysis, remains possibly
corresponding to Sandoval were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory
for analysis.

Laboratory analysis were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lane)
Date: Mon, 15 May 2017 12:07:02 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Army Cpl. John Lane, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted
for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1182327/soldier-
missing-from-korean-war-identified-lane/


In late July 1950, Lane was assigned to Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion,
19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, when the Korean People's
Army attacked the city of Chinju, South Korea. The regiment set up defensive
positions before withdrawing east to regroup. Upon arrival south of Masan
the battalion began accounting for its soldiers and when Lane could not be
accounted for, he was reported missing in action as of July 31, 1950.

Remains were disinterred by the Chinju Sanitation Department in 1987 and
sent to the Central Identification Laboratory for identification.


Recent technology in DNA and laboratory analysis were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 12 May, 2017 09:06
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Arizona Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Pfc. Manuel M.
Quintana, 19, of Klondyke, Arizona. 

He will be buried May 19 in Boulder City, Nevada.

His great-niece Isabella McGuff is available for interviews if you would
like to contact her at 702-452-6632.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Quintana on file.

/////


In late July 1950, Quintana was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 29th
Infantry Regiment, when his unit was ordered to move toward Hadong.  The
regiment unexpectedly encountered enemy forces, who quickly overpowered the
American forces. Following the battle, Quintana could not be accounted for
and was declared missing in action as of July 27, 1950.

Following the war, no returning American prisoners of war were able to
provide any information concerning Quintana's status. 

In December 1950, a set of unidentified remains was recovered from a grave
near Chinuju-Hadong Highway. Those remains were buried in the Masan United
Nations Military Cemetery as Unknown X-183. In 1951, the graves at Masan
cemetery were exhumed and transferred to the U.S. Army's Central
Identification Unit (CIU) in Kokura, Japan, for identification.

Several attempts were made to associate X-183 with unresolved casualties,
however with limited technology the remains could be attributed to 41
possibilities. In September 1955 it was determined the remains were
"unidentifiable" and were transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of
the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the "Punchbowl."

In December 2014, a family member requested the disinterment of Unknown
X-183 based on documents identifying another soldier with tentative
association.  In May 2016, the grave was exhumed and sent to the DPAA
laboratory for identification.

To identify Quintana's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a sister and nephew, as well as circumstantial evidence and
laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Today, 7,751 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

https://www.stripes.com/lifestyle/military-history/american-pow-in-world-war-ii-identified-from-grave-in-surprising-spot-in-poland-1.468136#.WRi-DPnyvIX

American POW in World War II identified from grave in surprising spot in Poland
By HOLLY ZACHARIAH | The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio | Published: May 12, 2017

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Tribune News Service) — Marilyn Walton had sat in her New Albany  home office and punched on her computer keyboard the same search terms she had typed hundreds of times before during the decade or so she had been researching the potential overseas gravesite of Army 1st Lt. Ewart Theodore Sconiers, who died in a Nazi POW camp in World War II....

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 May, 2017 11:07
Subject: Soldier Missing from World War II Identified (Eichelberger)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Lonnie B.C. Eichelberger, missing from World War II, has now been
Identified.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1179646/soldier-
missing-from-world-war-ii-identified-eichelberger/

In February 1942, Eichelberger was a member of Company I, 371st Infantry
Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division.  In an era of racial segregation, the 92nd
ID was the only African-American division to fight in Europe.  The division
fought at the westernmost portion of the Allied line in northern Italy from
November 1944 until April 1945.  As part of Operation Fourth Term,
Eichelberger's regiment fought in the hills near the town of Strettoia,
Italy.  His regiment suffered heavy losses while attacking German defenses.
Following the battle, Eichelberger could not be accounted for and was
declared missing in action.

Remains were disinterred from the Florence American Cemetery on June 29,
2016.
                 
Laboratory analysis was used in the identification of his remains. 
                 
Eichelberger's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an American
Battle Monuments Commission site along with other MIAs from WWII.  A rosette
will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Interment services are pending.   

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 May, 2017 10:22
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Texas Airman Accounted For From Vietnam War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Air Force Col.
William E. Campbell, 37, of McAllen, Texas.

He will be buried May 18 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His daughter, Catherine Campbell of Prattville, Alabama, is available for
interviews if you would like to call her at (678) 472-0448.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Campbell on file.

/////

On Jan. 29, 1969, Campbell was a member of the 497th Tactical Fighter
Squadron as an aircraft commander in a flight of two F-4Ds on an armed
reconnaissance mission over southern Laos.  Campbell was cleared to engage a
target, and his ordnance was seen impacting the ground.  Haze in the area
made for difficult visibility but immediately thereafter, aircrews saw a
large fireball on the ground in the vicinity of the target.  The crewmember
on another U.S. aircraft radioed the missing aircraft but received no reply,
and no parachutes were seen.  Efforts to make contact with Campbell
continued until the remaining planes were forced to leave the area due to
low fuel.  Campbell was subsequently declared missing in action.

Between 1994 and 2011, the Department of Defense conducted nine
investigations and excavated a site in both Vietnam and Laos in its attempts
to resolve this case.  In 2014, residents of Boualapha District, Khammouan
Province, in Laos turned over possible human remains and material evidence
reportedly recovered from crash sites in the vicinity of Ban Phanop Village,
the area where Campbell's aircraft was lost. 

To identify Campbell's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a maternal cousin, as well as dental analysis, which matched his
records, and circumstantial evidence.

The support from the governments of Laos and Vietnam were vital to the
success of this identification.

Today there are 1,611 American servicemen and civilians that are still
unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New tool could help solve long-forgotten MIA cases

By MATTHEW M. BURKE | STARS AND STRIPES       Published: May 11, 2017

 

.....However, thanks to a new tool developed by Kenneth Breaux and his team at M.I.A. Recovery Network, a nonprofit that advocates for missing-in-action servicemembers and their families, there is a renewed sense of hope that at least one of the men could soon be identified.

Breaux — a retired Navy officer with experience in data analysis — and his team have developed a database of unknown World War II-era U.S. soldiers buried in American cemeteries. After plotting the Military Grid Reference System location of each recovered unknown from the European theater and entering details — service branch, last-seen location, date of death, height and dental work — the team can search unit records for matches......

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 May, 2017 14:28
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Marine Identified From World War II (Gaver)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

The remains of Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Harry H. Gaver, Jr., killed in the
attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1174594/remains
-of-uss-oklahoma-marine-identified-from-world-war-ii-gaver/


On Dec. 7, 1941, Gaver was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Gaver. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the
USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Gaver.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Maryland Soldier Accounted For From Korean War
Date: Fri, 5 May 2017 12:47:31 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Louis A.
Damewood, 21, of Carroll County, Maryland.

He will be buried May 12 in Suffolk, Virginia.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Damewood on file.

/////

On February 13, 1951, Damewood was a member of Headquarters Company, 3rd
Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was
reported missing in action.  The unit was attacking a road block set up by
opposing forces near Hoengsong, South Korea, when he was declared missing. 

In 1953, a returning American prisoner of war reported that Damewood had
died in Changsong prisoner of war camp in June 1951.  Based on this
information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of June 13, 1951.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war
dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory." All remains recovered in
Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit
for analysis. The unidentified remains were interred as unknowns at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the
"Punchbowl."  One set of remains was designated "Unknown X-14160."

On Nov. 6, 2013, the remains designated as X-14160 were exhumed and sent to
the central identification laboratory for analysis. 

To identify Damewood's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, chest
radiograph comparison and anthropological analyses, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,751 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Sailor Accounted For From World War II
Date: Fri, 5 May 2017 12:34:47 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Fireman 1st
Class William H. Kennedy, 24, of Titonka, Iowa. 

He will be buried May 12 in his hometown.

His niece, Sharon Miller, of Denver, is available for interviews if you
would like to contact her at (303) 426-6606.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Kennedy on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kennedy was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Kennedy.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Kennedy.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Kennedy's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a niece and a great grand-nephew, as well as circumstantial evidence
and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,061 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Vermont Soldier Accounted For From Korean War
Date: Fri, 5 May 2017 13:05:16 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. George A.
Perreault, 20, of Burlington, Vermont.

He will be buried May 13 in his hometown. 

His niece, Karen O'Brien, of Salem, Massachusetts, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact her at (978) 745-2056.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Perreault on file.

/////

On Feb. 5, 1951, Perreault was a part of Support Force 21 and assigned to
Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division,
which was supporting Republic of Korean Army (ROKA) attacks against units of
the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the area known as the
Central Corridor in South Korea. On the evening of February 11, the CPVF
launched a massive counterattack against the ROKA regiment.  The ROKA
withdrew, leaving American units to fight alone at Changbong-ni, until they
were forced to withdraw too.  After enduring a sustained enemy attack, the
Support Force abandoned Hoengsong and moved toward Wonju.  Perreault never
reported to Wonju and he was reported missing in action on Feb. 13, 1951.

A list provided by the CPVF and Korean People's Army on Dec. 26, 1951 stated
that Perreault died as a prisoner of war, though the information could not
be confirmed.  Additionally, no returning American prisoners of war
immediately following the 1953 Operation Big Switch debriefings could
provide any information on him.  Based on the lack of information of his
status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Jan. 18, 1954.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes
of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered
during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of
at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean
documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains
were recovered from the area where Perreault was believed to have died.

To identify Perreault's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA
analysis, which matched a sister and two nieces; as well as anthropological
analysis, which matched his records; and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,751 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 4 May, 2017 08:43
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New Jersey Marine Accounted For From Vietnam War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Marine Corps Reserve
1st Lt. William C. Ryan, Jr., 25, of Hoboken, New Jersey.

He will be buried May 10 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His son, Michael Ryan, of Stone Ridge, Virginia, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact him at (703) 629-1546.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Ryan on file.

/////

On May 11, 1969, Ryan was the radar intercept officer of an F-4B aircraft,
assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Force 115, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 1st
Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force Pacific, on a combat mission over
Savannakhet Province, Laos.  While pulling out of a bombing pass, the
aircraft was hit by enemy fire.  The pilot lost control and called several
times for Ryan, but received no response.  The pilot ejected before the
aircraft crashed, and other members of the flight only witnessed one
parachute leave the aircraft.  The location of the crash site precluded a
search and recovery effort, but the pilot was rescued.  Ryan was declared
deceased as of May 11, 1969. 

From January 1990 until May 2012, joint teams from the U.S., the Lao
People's Democratic Republic and the Vietnamese Office for Seeking Missing
Persons interviewed numerous witnesses to the crash, gathering information
regarding Ryan's loss. 

From May 2012 until January 2016, joint teams made six trips to complete a
difficult excavation of a crash site associated with Ryan's loss, near Ban
Alang Noi, recovering life support items, aircraft wreckage and possible
human remains.  On Feb. 17, 2016, the remains were sent to the DPAA
laboratory for analysis.

To identify Ryan's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental comparisons,
including isotope analysis, which matched his records, as well as
circumstantial evidence.

The support from the government of Laos was vital to the success of this
recovery.

Today there are 1,611 American servicemen and civilians that are still
unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 April, 2017 11:15
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Oregon Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Freddie L.

Henson, 19, of Klamath Falls, Oregon.

He will be buried May 4 in Houston.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Henson on file.

/////

In late November 1950, Henson was a member of Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 5, only 385 of the approximately 3,200 Americans and South Koreans assigned to the 31st RCT were still fit for duty.  As the 57th FA BN accounted for its men from the battles, Henson was reported missing as of Dec. 6.

Henson's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning Henson as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Colley's remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea, based on information provided a Korean witness.  The site was in the vicinity of Twikkae Village.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human remains of at least five individuals.  The remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory in October 2004, where they remained until advancements in technology allowed for an identification.

To identify Henson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched a brother and a sister, as well as circumstantial and anthropological evidence, which matched his records.

Today, 7,751 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 20 April, 2017 07:17
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Minnesota Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Ensign Verdi D. Sederstrom, 25, of Montevideo, Minnesota.

He will be buried April 26 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

His nephew Robert Sederstrom is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at (503) 312-0997,

The Department of Defense has no photos of Sederstrom on file.

//////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Sederstrom was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was
moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Sederstrom.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Sederstrom.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Sederstrom's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched
two nieces and a nephew, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory
analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Sederstrom's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently, there are still 76,065 Americans still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Wisconsin Sailor Accounted For From World War II
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2017 12:46:50 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Fireman 3rd
Class Robert N. Walkowiak, 20, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

He will be buried April 28 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
in Honolulu.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Walkowiak on file.

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Walkowiak was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was
moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Walkowiak.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Walkowiak.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Walkowiak's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched a niece, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis,
to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,061 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For (Bussa)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:46:24 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Sir/Ma'am,
                 
Marine Corps 2nd Lt. George S. Bussa has now been accounted for.
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1159098/marine-
missing-from-world-war-ii-accounted-for-bussa/

In November 1943, Bussa was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance
on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in
an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Bussa died
sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.
                 
The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.
                 
Laboratory analysis was used in the identification of his remains. 
                 
DPAA is appreciative to History Flight, Inc., for their assistance in this
identification.

Interment services are pending.   

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media
at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 19 April, 2017 07:13
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Piper)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pvt. Walter F. Piper has now been accounted for.

Piper, assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry
Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was reported missing in action, Feb. 13,
1951 in North Korea.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Rick Downes,
Sent: 17 April, 2017 00:53
Subject: Re: Last US defector in North Korea dies [how will DoD explain away live sightings of former American soldiers now, if God willing we continue to get them?]

 

Poignant.

 

Rick

 

Richard Downes, Executive Director
Coalition of Families of Korean & Cold War POW/MIAs

www.coalitionoffamilies.org

 

 

April 10, 2017  Mark Sauter <markasauter@gmail.com> wrote:

US defector to #Northkorea Jim Dresnok died last year: @chadocl
https://www.nknews.org/2017/04/jim-dresnok-american-who-defected-to-n-korea-in-1962-died-in-2016/

 

See declassified US files on Dresnok and other US defectors at Mark Sauter’s site: http://www.dmzwar.com/usmilitarydefectorstonorthkorea.html

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 17 April, 2017 07:08
Subject: Sailor Killed in World War II Identified (Surratt)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Seaman 1st Class Milton R. Surratt has now been accounted for.

Surratt, assigned to the USS Oklahoma, was killed Dec. 7, 1941 in Pearl
Harbor, Hawaii.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 14 April, 2017 10:33
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Lucas)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Richard A. Lucas has now been accounted for.

Lucas, of Company C, 1st Battalion 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry
Division, was reported Missing in Action, Nov. 26, 1950, in North Korea.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Airman Missing From World War II Identified (Hirschi)
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2017 11:28:11 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces Pvt. Harold S. Hirschi has now been accounted for.

Hirschi, of Headquarters Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, died Nov. 19,
1942 in the Philippines.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2017

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Fireman 1st Class Michael Galajdik U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/3/2017


 

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Illinois Sailor Accounted For From World War II
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2017 11:18:54 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Navy Fireman 1st
Class Michael Galajdik, 25, of Joliet, Illinois, killed during World War II.

He will be buried April 22 in Elwood, Illinois.

His nephew, George Sternisha, of Crest Hill, Illinois, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at (815) 685-8994.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Galajdik on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Galajdik was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it
to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429
crewmen, including Galajdik.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the
exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Iverson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Galajdik's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which
matched two nieces and a nephew, as well as circumstantial evidence and
laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,067 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Sutton)
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2017 12:33:39 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Leslie R. Sutton has now been accounted for.

Sutton, of Battery C, 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment,
1st Cavalry Division was reported missing in action, Nov. 2, 1950, in North
Korea.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From Korean War
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2017 11:18:08 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Pfc. Kenneth R.
Miller, 23, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

He will be buried April 21 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
in Honolulu.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Miller on file.

/////

On April 23, 1951, Miller was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 19th
Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, when his unit was forced to
withdraw from their position while fighting the Chinese Communist Forces
(CCF).  Miller was reported missing in action following the withdrawal.

The Army Graves Registration Service attempted to account for the losses
suffered during the battle, but searches yielded no results for Miller.

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Miller died while in
captivity at POW Camp 1, Changsong, North Korea in September 1951.  Based on
this information, the U.S. Army declared Miller deceased as of Sept. 22,
1951.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war
dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory." All remains recovered in
Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit
for analysis. The remains they were unable to identify were interred as unknowns
at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the
"Punchbowl."

In 1999, due to advances in technology, the Department of Defense began to
re-examine records and concluded that the possibility for identification of
some of these unknowns now existed. The remains designated X-14138 were
exhumed on August 20, 2015, so further analysis could be conducted.

To identify Miller's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used anthropological, dental and chest radiograph
comparison analysis; mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched an uncle and
a cousin; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Today, 7,754 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website

at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call

(703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 13 April, 2017 11:53
Subject: Soldier Killed in Korean War Identified (Cushman)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. 1st Class Richard G. Cushman has now been accounted for.

Cushman, of Company A, 72nd Medium Tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division,
was reported missing in action Dec. 5, 1950 in North Korea.

DPAA appreciates the Korean People's Army, as well as Korean witnesses Mr.
Man Hyon Ho and Mr. Anh Il Chang, for their assistance and partnership in
this recovery effort.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2016

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
2nd Lt. Marvin B. Rothman U.S. Army Air Forces 311th Fighter Squadron, 58th Fighter Group 4/11/1944 New Guinea 7/15/2016

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 12 April, 2017 08:04
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Air Forces 2nd
Lt. Marvin B. Rothman, 21, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, unaccounted for from
World War II.

He will be buried April 19 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His 2nd cousin, Alan Lichtcsien is available for interviews if you would
like to contact him at (561)-254-2482.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Rothman on file.

/////

On April 11, 1944, Rothman was assigned to the 311th Fighter Squadron, 58th
Fighter Group, and was the pilot of a single-seat P-47D Thunderbolt, on a
bombing escort mission with 15 other Thunderbolts to Wewak, Territory of New
Guinea, when he was attacked by enemy fighter aircraft. When the escort
flight returned from the mission, Rothman and two other P-47D pilots were
reported missing.  The War Department declared Rothman deceased as of Feb.
6, 1946.

In September 1946, a U.S. infantry officer informed the American Graves
Registration Service in Finschhafen, New Guinea, that an Australian War
Graves team had recovered remains of a suspected American airman from the
wreckage of an aircraft with a partial serial number correlating to
Rothman's plane. 

In November 1946, AGRS personnel examined the remains and subsequently tried
to confirm the identity based on dental records.  However, the dental charts
were incomplete and an identification could not be established.

Based on the lack of conclusive evidence, in January 1950, an AGRS board
declared Rothman to be non-recoverable

In July 2004, a contractor for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command
investigated a crash site found by local residents of Suanum Village, East
Sepik Province, Paupa New Guinea, finding material evidence an aircraft data
plate matching the serial number of Rothman's plane.  A U.S. recovery team
returned to the site in August 2009 and recovered possible human remains and
other artifacts.

To identify Rothman's remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological and
circumstantial evidence, as well as dental analysis, which matched Rothman's
records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war. Currently, there are 73,067 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.  Rothman's name is recorded on the Walls
of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery along with other MIAs from WWII.
A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted
for.


For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa,
or call (703) 699-1420.


SSG Kristen Duus
Chief of External Communications
Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
241 18th St. South, Suite 800
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 699-1420

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Identified (Kovach)
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2017 11:49:53 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

The remains of U.S. Army Technician 4th Grade John Kovach, Jr. have now been accounted for.

Kovach was assigned to Company C, 192nd Tank Battalion, when he died Nov. 19, 1942 in the Philippines.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Sailor Killed in World War II Identified (Thompson, W.M.)
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2017 11:16:31 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Reserve Ensign William M. Thompson, has now been accounted for.

Thompson, assigned to the USS Oklahoma, was killed Dec. 7, 1941 during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Sailor Killed in World War II Identified (Neher)
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2017 11:15:53 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Don O. Neher, has now been accounted for.

Neher, assigned to the USS Oklahoma, was killed Dec. 7, 1941 during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1420.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Life as a POW: An all-American meal has extra meaning ... Sunday marks National Former POW Day, with a second POW/MIA day observed on ...
 

According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Sgt. Joseph Durakovich, of Gary, Ind., served in Company G, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, when his regiment was attacked by the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces in Pongmyong-ni, North Korea, in late November 1950. The Americans withdrew along a supply route to Samso-ri, the DPAA reports, and were unable to break through a roadblock. Following a battle there, Sgt. Durakovich was unaccounted for and was reported missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950....

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 6 April, 2017 09:35
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Identified (Sconiers)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ewart T. Sconiers, missing from World War II, has
now been identified.

On Oct. 21, 1942, Sconiers was a member of the 414th Bombardment Squadron,
97th Bombardment Group, serving as the bombardier on the B-17F Flying
Fortress, during a mission to bomb the German U-boat pens at Lorient,
France.  During the attack, the aircraft received severe damage, but the
entire crew parachuted safely, landing in water near Brest, France, where
they were picked up by a French fishing vessel and turned over to German
forces as prisoners of war.  The Americans were sent to Dulag Luft in
Oberusal, Germany for interrogation, and on Nov. 11, 1942, Sconiers was
transferred to Stalag Luft II in Sagan, Germany (present-day Zagan, Poland),
where he remained until Jan 9, 1944. 

Sconiers was reported to have died Jan. 24, 1944.

In 2015, during an independent investigation, a headstone with Sconiers name
was identified in Poland.  The remains were disinterred in 2016 and sent to
the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending. 

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2016

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Fred M. Jones U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 12/15/2016

 

Subject: Sailor Killed in World War II Identified (Jones)
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 2017 13:27:50 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Machinist's Mate 1st Class Fred M. Jones, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Joneswas assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese
aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Jones. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of
the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Jones.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2016

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Seaman 1st Class George A. Coke U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 12/15/2016

 

Subject: Sailor Killed in World War II Identified (Jones)
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 2017 13:27:50 +0000
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Seaman 1st Class George A. Coke, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Coke was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Coke. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of
the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Coke.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 6 April, 2017 08:32
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Kelly)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Daniel F. Kelly, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

In late November 1950, Kelly was a member of C Company, 1st Battalion, 9th
Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was ordered to
advance as part of preparations for an offensive to push the North Koreans
to the Yala River. By the night of November 25, the Chinese People's
Volunteer Forces (CPVF) had begun relentless attacks which continued
throughout the night and into the next morning. After the battle, it was
determined that Kelly became Missing in Action on Nov. 26, 1950.

In 2002, a joint U.S. and Korean People's Army recovery team conducted
operations in North Korea, recovering possible remains.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending. 

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 5 April, 2017 08:09
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Alabama Marine Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted For Marine Corps Pfc.
James O. Whitehurst, 20, of Ashford, Alabama, unaccounted for from World War
II.

He will be buried April 12 in Cowarts, Alabama.

His nephew, Charles Odom, of Dothan, Alabama, is available for interviews if
you would like to contact him at (334) 685-6249.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Whitehurst on file.

/////

In November 1943, Whitehurst was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese
resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert
Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense
fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and
more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.
Whitehurst died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in
the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration
Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Whitehurst's
remains were not recovered.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Whitehurst's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and
anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as
circumstantial and material evidence.

DPAA is appreciative to History Flight, Inc. and their partnership for this
recovery mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 73,070 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 4 April, 2017 11:17
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Henson)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Freddie L. Henson, unaccounted for from the Korean War, has now
been identified.

In late November 1950, Henson was a member of Battery A, 57th Field
Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and
700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team
(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it
was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 5, only 385
of the approximately 3,200 Americans and South Koreans assigned to the 31st
RCT were still fit for duty.  As the 57th FA BN accounted for its men from
the battles, Henson was reported missing as of Dec. 6.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted
operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County,
North Korea, based on information provided a Korean witness.  The site was
in the vicinity of Twikkae Village.  During the excavation, the recovery
team recovered possible human remains of at least five individuals.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 4 April, 2017 10:55
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Identified (Gass)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Reece Gass, unaccounted for from World War II, has now been
identified.

On Jan. 14, 1945, Gass was a member of Company E, 33rd Armored Regiment, 3rd
Armored Division, moving from the Lomre area toward Cherain, Belgium, in a
three-pronged advance against enemy forces.  As fighting drove them back,
five tanks from the regiment were lost, including at least two from Gass'
company.  Gass was reported to have been killed in action after his tank was
hit by enemy fire. 

In May 2016, DPAA disinterred Unknown X-5867 in the Luxembourg American
Cemetery and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in his
identification.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 4 April, 2017 10:51
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Fox)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Jack J. Fox, unaccounted for from World War II,
has now been identified.

In November 1943, Fox was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines,
2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the
small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an
attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Fox died
sometime on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

In November 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company began
disinterment to bring the remains to Oahu for identification at the Central
Identification Laboratory.  In 1949 and 1950, the remains that could not be
identified were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
("Punchbowl") in Honolulu.

In October 2016,  set of remains were exhumed from the Punchbowl and sent to
the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2016

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Master Sgt. Joseph Durakovich U.S. Army Company G, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 11/22/2016

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 3 April, 2017 09:45
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Indiana Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Master Sgt.
Joseph Durakovich, 30, of Gary, Indiana, unaccounted for from the Korean
War.

He will be buried April 10 in Arlington National Cemetery.

His son, David Durakovich, of Coshocton, Ohio, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact him at (313) 790-6483.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Durakovich on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November 1950, Durakovich was a member of Company G, 5th Cavalry
Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, establishing a defensive position in
Pongmyong-ni east of Kuni-ri, North Korea, when they were attacked by the
Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  The Americans were continually
attacked as they withdrew along the main supply route to Samso-ri, and they
encountered a roadblock they could not break through.  Following the battle,
Durakovich could not be accounted for and was reported missing in action on
Nov. 28, 1950.

Durakovich's name did not appear on any POW list provided by the CPVF or the
North Korean People's Army, and no returning American POWs provided any
information concerning Durakovich as a possible prisoner of war.  Based on
this information, a military review board amended his status to deceased in
1953. 

In August and September 2002, a Joint U.S. and Korean People's Army recovery
team conducted a Joint Recovery Operation at a site in Ung Bong, Village,
North Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses.  The
site was approximately 30 kilometers from where Durakovich was last seen.
During the excavation, the team recovered material evidence and possible
human remains. 

 To identify Durakovich's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial and Y-chromosome short
tandem repeat DNA analysis, which matched a niece and grandson, as well as
dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and
circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,755 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Korean War MIA buried in Massachusetts hometown ... June and identified as Hauterman by the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 March, 2017 10:01
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Department of Defense has accounted for Navy Seaman 2nd Class Vernon N.
Grow, 25, of Redding California, unaccounted for from World War II.

He will be buried April 7 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific,
known as the Punchbowl, in Hawaii.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Grow on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

On Dec. 7, 1941, Grow was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in 429 casualties, including Grow.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Grow.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

To identify Grow's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA
Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched his
cousins, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to
include dental comparisons, which matched Grow's records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently, there are 73,072 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 March, 2017 13:27
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Pennsylvania Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Cpl. James T.
Mainhart, 19, of Butler, Pennsylvania, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried April 8 in his hometown.

His nephew, Thomas Mainhart, is available for interviews if you would like
to contact him at (724) 287-1834.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Mainhart on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November 1950, Mainhart was a member of Company I, 31st Infantry
Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South
Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which
was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged
by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 6, the U.S. Army
evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining
soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  When the
unit withdrew from the east side of the Chosin Reservoir. Mainhart's body
could not be evacuated.  He was reported killed in action as of Nov. 30,
1950.

Mainhart's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no
repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning
Mainhart as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the
U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Nov. 30, 1950.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American
remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war,
administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea
complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and
October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned.
However, Mainhart's remains were not included and he was declared
non-recoverable.

In September and October 2004, personnel from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting
Command (now DPAA), conducted the 36th Joint Recovery Operation with the
Korean People's Army in the vicinity of the Chosin River.  During the
mission, a witness statement reported that remains believed to be American
had been found and reburied.  Recovery Team 2 found a site that contained
material evidence and possible remains of at least five individuals. 

To identify Mainhart's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and
autosomal (auDNA) DNA analysis, which matched a brother and nephew, as well
as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial
evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains
that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by
American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 March, 2017 14:09
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Texas Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Sgt. Homer R.
Abney, 24, of Dallas, unaccounted for from the Korean War. 

He will be buried April 7 in his hometown.

His niece, Nenva Vines, of Montgomery, Texas, is available for interviews if
you would like to contact her at (972) 567-1854.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Abney on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~


/////

In late November, 1950, Abney was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 9th
Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting units
of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces in North Korea.  By the early
morning of Nov. 30, the road from Kunu-ri to Sunch'on was heavily fortified
with a series of enemy roadblocks, later named "The Gauntlet."  The regiment
sustained more casualties than any other unit during the battle, and it was
following that battle that Abney was declared missing.

The CPVF and North Korean People's Army periodically provided lists of
prisoners of war during the war, but none listed Abney.  Following the war,
three returning American prisoners reported that Abney died at Hofong Camp
in March 1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him
deceased as of March 31, 1951.

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA) and
Korea People's Army Recovery Team, conducted the 37th Joint Field Activity,
visiting a site near Pukchin-Tarigol Prisoner of war camp.  Possible human
remains were found, but the condition of the site indicated it was a second
burial site.  

To identify Abney's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a
sister and maternal niece, as well as anthropological analysis, which
matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA
website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa
or call (703) 699-1420.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 30 March, 2017 14:28
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Sadewasser)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. William R. Sadewasser, unaccounted for from the Korean War, has
now been identified.

In late November, 1950, Sadewasser was a member of Headquarters Battery,
57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500
U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat
Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea,
when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 6,
the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the
remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.
Because Sadewasser could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the
battle, he was reported missing in action as of Nov. 28, 1950.

During the 32nd Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted
operations on the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, on Hill
1221.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human
remains of at least 11 individuals.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending. 

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/a-soldier-comes-home-from-the-war-after-more-than-70-years/2017/03/28/d66c003e-13f5-11e7-833c-503e1f6394c9_story.html?utm_term=.8e65de8b624d

Marine Pvt. Harry K. Tye

A Marine comes home from the war after more than 70 years

 

 

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Capt. James W. Boyden U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Marine Torpedo Bombing Squadron 233, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force 2/14/1944 Papua New Guinea 3/3/2017

NOT Noted on above master chart as of 03/29/2017

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 29 March, 2017 12:55
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Boyden)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve Capt. James W. Boyden, missing from World War II, has
now been identified. 

On Feb. 14, 1944, Boyden was a member of the Marine Torpedo Bombing Squadron
233, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force, as the pilot of a Grumann
torpedo bomber on an experimental mission to destroy enemy shipping in
Simpson Harbor, New Britain.  The mission included 26 bombers deploying
aircraft-borne mines to disrupt the flow of men and material to the
sprawling Japanese base at Rabaul.  Boyden's plane took off at 2:30 in the
morning as part of the last wave of attacking torpedo bombers.  Once over
the harbor, the American aircraft encountered intense anti-aircraft fire and
sustained heavy losses.  At the end of the battle, six bombers and their 18
crewman failed to return from their mission, including Boyden. 

On Feb. 15, 1945, War Department officials declared Boyden deceased.  The
American Battle Monuments Commission memorialized Boyden and the other
missing crewmen by inscribing their names on the Walls of the Missing,
Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.

In 2016, personnel from DPAA conducted an excavation of a possible crash
site and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending. 

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Sgt. Donald D. Noehren U.S. Army Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 2/3/2017

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 March, 2017 09:35
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Sgt. Donald D.
Noehren, 23, of Harlan, Iowa, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried April 3 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His niece, Peggy Booth, of Carlsbad, California, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact her at 760-929-1111.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Noehren on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November 1950, Noehren was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters
Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division,
fighting units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in North
Korea, in a delaying action south from the Ch'ongch'on River to Kunu-ri.
The unit was ordered to withdraw, and encountered a number of heavily
defended enemy roadblocks, continuous enemy mortar, small arms and
machine-gun fire.  Many soldiers, including Noehren, were captured.  He was
declared missing in action as of Nov. 30, 1950.

Noehren's name did not appear on any POW list provided by the CPVF or the
North Korean People's Army, however two repatriated American prisoners of
war reported that Noehren died at Hofong Camp, part of Pukchin-Tarigol Camp
Cluster, on Jan. 22, 1951.  Based on this information, a military review
board amended Noehren's status to deceased in 1951. 

In April and May of 2005, a Joint Recovery Team conducted the 37th Joint
Field Activity in Unsan County, South Pyongan Province, North Korea.  On
April 19, the team visited a site reported by a local witness to contain
American remains. 

To identify Noehren's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a
brother, sister and nephew, as well as anthropological analysis, which
matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
In this Jan. 22, 2017 photo provided by the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific members of a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency joint ...

From: Patrick
Sent: 27 March, 2017 07:23
Subject: Dignified transfer of Battle of Tarawa Marine From World War II Accounted For Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise

 

Morning,

Marine Pvt. Harry K. Tye, 21, of Orinoco, Kentucky, will be buried with full military honors March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery. Tye died sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015 and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis was used which matched Tye’s records; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

Respectfully,


Patrick J. Hughes U.S.M.C. Chu
Lai 67-68
God Bless America

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 March, 2017 08:38
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Identified (Temple) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Seaman 1st Class Monroe Temple, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Temple was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Temple. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of
the
USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Temple.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
MIA Korean War soldier finally coming home ... military file that made that connection through the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency....

 

The newly identified remains of Army Cpl. Jules Hauterman Jr. of Holyoke will be returned to Massachusetts Wednesday after more than six decades at a military cemetery in Hawaii, where they were kept under the name “Unknown X-15904.”

  His dog tags were with his remains and DPAA has had them since 1990!    mc
 
BERLIN NH — Army Cpl. Joseph Norman Pelletier will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, more than 65 years after the Berlin man died in a North Korean POW camp.    Raymond Pelletier said he was shocked late last year when he received a call from the Army’s Repatriation Unit reporting that his brother’s remains had been identified.
From: richard <richard@storytellerfilms.tv>
Cc: richard <richard@storytellerfilms.tv>
Sent: Wed, Mar 22, 2017 3:12 pm
Subject: The MIA film progress report
 
An update:

We have moved the Solemn Promise film forward.
 
Here are the links for two segments of the film done in modular form. 
When we finish the project and secure a celebrity Voice-Over the VO track will be re-produced.
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzibI9qdGFY WWII widow of MIA; Betty Seale.
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qgt1pgFZ2so  Recovering MIAs; interview with Deputy Director of DPAA.
 
Contact for more information is shown below. 
 
Richard Jellerson
626.355.0260
Screen Storyteller Original Films at storytellerfilms.tv

 

http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2017/03/army_cpl_jules_hauterman_of_ho.html

Funeral set for Army Cpl. Jules Hauterman of Holyoke recalled as baseball fan, liked ice skating, eager to join army

By Mike Plaisance | mplaisance@repub.com 
March 22, 2017 at 4:39 PM, updated March 22, 2017 at 5:30 PM


HOLYOKE -- Robert Whelihan was 9 when he walked across the hall to say goodbye to Jules Hauterman Jr., as U.S. Army Cpl. Hauterman completed what would be his last leave in Holyoke. It was 1950.

"I remember the last time I saw him like it was yesterday. He said he was going back and we gave each other hugs and kisses and I told him to get back safely. It was in his kitchen. We lived across the hall," said Whelihan, 76, of South Hadley.

 

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Cpl. Joseph N. Pelletier U.S Army Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 12/21/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:58
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New Hampshire Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Joseph N.
Pelletier, 20, of Berlin, New Hampshire, unaccounted for from the Korean
War.

He will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His brother, Raymond Pelletier, of Hampden, Maine, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at (207) 852-5402.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Pelletier on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November, 1950, Hauterman was a medic with the Medical Platoon, 1st
Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, when his unit was
attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team as one of its infantry
battalions for the mission.  The 31st RCT advanced to occupy the east side
of the Chosin River.  For four days, the unit battled the 80th Division of
the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  The 31st RCT finally
conducted a fighting withdraw south for relative safety at the Marine Base
in Hagaru-ri.  The convoy was eventually destroyed by the CPVF, and while
some escaped across the frozen reservoir, more than 1,300 were captured or
killed.  Following the battle, Hauterman could not be accounted for and he
was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

The CPVF and North Korean People's Army periodically provided lists of
prisoners of war during the war, but none listed Hauterman.  Additionally,
no returning American prisoners of war reported to have any information
regarding Hauterman as a prisoner of war.    Based on the lack of
information regarding his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased. 

On Sept. 15, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from the East
Chosin Reservoir were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in
Kokura, Japan and attempted to make an identification.  The remains,
identified as X-15904, were declared unidentifiable in 1955, and were
transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

On June 13, 2016, the remains identified as "Unknown X-15904" were
disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hauterman's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, to include dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
Remains of soldier reported MIA in 1950 are returning home
Cpl. Jules Hauterman Jr. is scheduled to be buried in Holyoke on March 31 with full military honors, according to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA ...
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Cpl. Jules Hauterman U.S. Army Medical Platoon, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 12/14/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:46
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Massachusetts Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Jules
Hauterman, Jr., 19, of Hampden, Massachusetts, unaccounted for from the
Korean War.

He will be buried March 31 in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

His cousin, Cecile Stuntz, of South Hadley, Massachusetts, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact her at (413) 536-0790.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hauterman on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November, 1950, Hauterman was a medic with the Medical Platoon, 1st
Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, when his unit was
attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team as one of its infantry
battalions for the mission.  The 31st RCT advanced to occupy the east side
of the Chosin River.  For four days, the unit battled the 80th Division of
the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  The 31st RCT finally
conducted a fighting withdraw south for relative safety at the Marine Base
in Hagaru-ri.  The convoy was eventually destroyed by the CPVF, and while
some escaped across the frozen reservoir, more than 1,300 were captured or
killed.  Following the battle, Hauterman could not be accounted for and he
was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

The CPVF and North Korean People's Army periodically provided lists of
prisoners of war during the war, but none listed Hauterman.  Additionally,
no returning American prisoners of war reported to have any information
regarding Hauterman as a prisoner of war.    Based on the lack of
information regarding his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased. 

On Sept. 15, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from the East
Chosin Reservoir were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in
Kokura, Japan and attempted to make an identification.  The remains,
identified as X-15904, were declared unidentifiable in 1955, and were
transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

On June 13, 2016, the remains identified as "Unknown X-15904" were
disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hauterman's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, to include dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Capt. Albert L. Schlegel USAAF 335th Fighter Squadron, 84th Fighter Group, 8th Air Force 8/28/1944 France 12/9/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:28
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From World War II (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Air Forces
Capt. Albert L. Schlegel, 25, of Cleveland, Ohio, unaccounted for from World
War II.

A service will be held at the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force
in Pooler, Georgia, on March 29, followed by a burial at the Beaufort VA
National Cemetery in Beaufort, South Carolina, March 30.

His family member, Perry Nuhn, of Okatie, South Carolina, is available for
interviews if you would like to call (843) 540-0987.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Schlegel on file.

For information on attending the services or for interviews, please contact
Pearl Fyderek, Director of Marketing, National Museum of the Mighty Eighth
Air Force at (912) 988-1848.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

On Aug. 28, 1944, Schlegel was the pilot and sole occupant of a P-51D
Mustang aircraft, departing his base in England on a ground strafing mission
to Strasbourg, France, when he radioed that he had been hit by heavy
anti-aircraft fire and would need to bail from his aircraft.  There was no
further communication from Schlegel.  Historical records indicated that
locals in Valmy, France reported that an unknown American aviator was
captured in their village that same evening. 

On Nov. 18, 1944, a set of remains was found near a train station in Valmy.
The remains were transferred to the temporary American cemetery at
Champigueul, and designated as X-73.  On Dec. 6, 1948, the American Graves
Registration Command declared the remains unidentifiable.  He was interred
in the Epinal American Cemetery in France under a headstone that read "Here
Rests in Honored Glory a Comrade in Arms Known but to God."

In January 2016, DPAA researchers determined that through advanced forensic
technology, the remains might be identified, and X-73 was disinterred and
the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory in Offutt Air Force Base,
Nebraska, for identification. 

To identify Schlegel's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, including dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their
assistance, support and care of his burial site. Additionally, Schlegel's
name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an ABMC site along with
nearly 79,000 other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his
name, to indicate he has been accounted for.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 76,074 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Pvt. Harry K. Tye U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 5/6/2016

 

Subject: FW: LOCAL CONNECTION: Kentucky Marine Accounted For From World War II (U)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 13:46:19 +0000
From: Moe Moyer <jmoyer@usocentralflorida.org>
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>
 

Welcome HOME Private Tye!

Special salute to Mark Noah and his HISTORY FLIGHT Team for another Recovery!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:17
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Kentucky Marine Accounted For From World War II (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Marine Pvt. Harry K.
Tye, 21, of Orinoco, Kentucky, unaccounted for from World War II.

He will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His great nephew, David Tincher, is available for interviews if you would
like to contact him at (615) 956-3652.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Tye on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////


In November 1943, Tye was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines,

2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the
small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an
attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Tye died
sometime on
the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration
Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Tye's
remains were  not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board
declared Tye's  remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Tye's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical
Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, which matched a
nephew; laboratory analysis, including dental analysis and anthropological
comparison, which matched Tye's records; as well as circumstantial and
material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for this recovery mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died  during the war.  Currently there are 73,074 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: FW: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Spayd)
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 20:20:39 +0000
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>
 

Welcome HOME Private Spayd!

A Salute to History Flight for their extensive work on Tarawa in their recovery of former MIAs from WW II.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 17 March, 2017 11:43
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Spayd)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Donald S. Spayd, unaccounted for from World War
II, has now been identified.

In November 1943, Spayd was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance
on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in
an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Spayd died
sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for this recovery mission.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

America's MIA Mission Continues in Arunachal

NorthEast Today    03/16/17

Kuhles, accordingly reported his discovery to the US Defense Department's Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC). A year later, on November... ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 March, 2017 09:29
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Identified (Casto)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Casto, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Casto was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Casto. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the
USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Casto.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 March, 2017 09:23
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Florida Soldier Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for 2nd Lt. John D.
Mumford, 22, of St. Petersburg, Florida, unaccounted for from World War II.

He will be buried March 23 in his hometown.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Mumford on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////


On June 6, 1944, Mumford, while serving with the 318th Fighter Squadron,
325th Fighter Group, 15th Air Force, flew his last mission as the pilot and
sole occupant of a P-51C "Mustang" fighter. Mumford and other pilots of the
325th Fighter Group were assigned escort duty, accompanying and protecting a
flight of B-17 "Flying Fortress" bombers of the 5th Bombardment Wing on
their mission to bomb and destroy a German occupied airfield at Galati,
Romania. After successfully completing the bombing mission, the bombers and
their escort fighters came under attack by German fighters. Mumford was last
seen by fellow pilots in pursuit of two German fighters. Later, villagers of
Novotroyan- present day Novi Troyany- Ukraine, observed two aircraft with
U.S. markings pursued by several German aircraft. One of the U.S. aircraft
crashed in a nearby field.

In 2008 and 2010, personnel from predecessor organizations of DPAA visited
the village of Novi Troyany, interviewing witnesses to the crash,
correlating it to Mumford's loss, and surveying the site of the crash to
prepare for future excavation.

In July and August 2016, DPAA, jointly with the Ukraine Armed Forces and the
National Museum of Military History of Ukraine, excavated the crash site.

To identify Mumford's remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological
analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 15 March, 2017 07:20
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Mitchell)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Robert E. Mitchell, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

On Sept. 6, 1950, Mitchell was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 38th
Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was attacking enemy
forces of the Korean People's Army that had penetrated the Naktong Bulg
portion of the Pusan Perimeter near Am-sin, South Korea.  Following the
series of attacks, Mitchell could not be accounted for and was reported
missing in action.

In late 2014, Mitchell's family requested the disinterment of Unknown X-5698
Tanggok, based on a tentative name association.  Unknown X-5698 was
disinterred from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu
and accessioned to the DPAA laboratory on May 16, 2016.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 March, 2017 12:49
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Jimerson) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

In late November, 1950, Jimerson was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,
24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when his unit engaged with
opposing forces near Anju, North Korea.  He was reported missing in action
as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of
war cemetery at Camp 5 were sent to the Central Identification Unit in Japan
for attempted identification and further processing. This set of remains was
designated X-14400, and was determined unidentifiable in November 1955.

In February 2014 the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency requested the
disinterment of Unknown X-14400. In June 2014, X-14400 was disinterred from
the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific and accessioned into the
laboratory.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~
http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/34678798/66-years-later-fort-campbell-korean-war-soldier-identified-buried

66 years later, Fort Campbell Korean War soldier identified, buried

CLARKSVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

Going back to 1950, President Harry Truman was in office, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show premiered, and All About Eve won Best Picture. That's a long time ago, especially for a man who's waited all these years for closure. Still, he never gave up.

"It's what I prayed for," said Rex Cummings of Clarksville. "Never give up. Never give up."

Sixty-six years. That's how long Cummings has waited. Wife Deborah sat with him on a couch at Neal-Tarpley-Parchman Funeral Home as he finally got a chance to say goodbye to a man he never had the chance to meet.

In the late 1940s, Robert Cummings was a Michigan boy ready to join the Army. He ended up at Fort Campbell. It was a post surrounded by acres of farmland, distant helicopters barely cutting through the quiet at night....

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 March, 2017 12:49
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Jimerson) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

In late November, 1950, Jimerson was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,
24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when his unit engaged with
opposing forces near Anju, North Korea.  He was reported missing in action
as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of