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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

2014
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AR Family Prepares for POW Remains to Return Home
 
A family receives notice the government recovered remains of soldier missing for more than 60 years.
 
CONWAY, AR--An Arkansas woman says she received word the remains of her missing husband are on the way home.

Geraldean Johnson says she's waited 63 years for her husband's return and she got the call she'd been waiting for last week.

In 1950 Corporal C.G. Bolden left his wife and son in Clinton to fight in the Korean War. He'd been gone for less than six months when the family received a visitor. ....

Remains of Korean War POW buried in NE Indiana

FREMONT, Ind. (AP) — The coffin carrying the remains of a northeastern Indiana soldier who died during the Korean war passed under a large American flag as it arrived at a cemetery for burial.

About 250 people attended Monday’s graveside service for Cpl. Leland Ford Smith of Angola. The Army says the infantryman was 18 years old when died from malnutrition at a North Korean prisoner camp in 1951...

Recently Accounted-For

The names listed here are U.S. military servicemembers who were once missing and are now accounted-for. Additional information may be seen by visiting the respective Vietnam, Korean War and WWII databases on this site.

These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • Cpl. Francis D. Knobel, U.S. Army, Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 12, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Dec. 10, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Pfc. Anthony Massey Jr., U.S. Army, Company C, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost Nov. 28, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Dec. 5, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Gordon L. Hannah, U.S. Army, Company K, 3rd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Jan. 28, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for Dec. 3, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Cpl. Donald A. Therkelsen, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, was lost July 17, 1953, in North Korea. He was accounted for Dec. 2, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. Gilberto L. Sanchez, U.S Army, Medical Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost Dec. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 25, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Earl E. Hilgenberg, U.S. Army, Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost Nov. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 17, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Cpl. Abie L. Apodaca, U.S. Army, Heavy Mortar Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Feb. 14, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 13, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.

 

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/11/09/korean-war-pow-laid-to-rest-60-years-after-capture-and-death/

Military

Korean War POW who died 60 years ago is laid to rest


Army Sgt. Lee Henderson Manning’s burial was held Friday at the Inglewood Park Cemetery near Los Angeles, bringing relief to his sister and other relatives.

 

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http://news.yahoo.com/korean-war-casualty-buried-inglewood-085056692.html;_ylt=AwrBEiEYoF9UxBIAmkzQtDMD

Funeral held for soldier who died in Korean War

INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) — A U.S. soldier who died as a POW during the Korean War received full military honors in a hometown funeral attended by family members who feared the day might never come.
 
Army Sgt. Lee Henderson Manning, whose remains were recently identified, was finally laid to rest near his mother at Inglewood Park Cemetery near Los Angeles after a service that included presentations by representatives of South Korea and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. An Army honor guard fired rifles in salute, and the flag from the casket was presented to Manning's sisters, Carrie Elam and Helena Parker.

"My heart is very full," Elam told reporters. "I never ever thought that it would come to fruition like this."

Manning was just 20 years old when he enlisted right out of high school in 1950 and trained as a medic. He had hoped to become a doctor someday.

Returning prisoners of war reported Manning was captured by Chinese forces while rendering aid to members of the 9th Infantry Regiment during a 1950 battle. He died six months later from medical neglect.....

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  The Defense POW/MIA Office announced the identification of remains belonging to eight airmen who had been missing-in-action since World War II. Returned home are:

-Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William D. Bernier, 28, of Augusta, Mont.

-1st Lt. Bryant E. Poulsen, 22, of Salt Lake City, Utah

-1st Lt. Herbert V. Young Jr., 23, of Clarkdale, Ariz.

-Tech Sgt. Charles L. Johnston, 20, of Pittsburgh, Penn.

-Tech Sgt. Hugh F. Moore, 36, of Elkton, Md.

-Staff Sgt. John E. Copeland, 21, of Dearing, Kan.

-Staff Sgt. Charles J. Jones, 24, of Athens, Ga.

-Sgt. Charles A. Gardner, 32, of San Francisco, Calif.

The crew of the B-24D Liberator was on a mission out of Nazdab Air Field in New Guinea to attack an anti-aircraft site at Hansa Bay on April 10, 1944, when the aircraft was shot down by enemy anti-aircraft fire. The eight airmen recovered are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors. For details about the crew, click here .
 
Nov 8  2014
Nephew of missing soldier: 'I had kind of given up'
Sgt. Shelia Sledge, public affairs officer with the Department of Defense's POW/MIA Office, said events like this happen six to eight times a year. Family ...

...Though most families in attendance Saturday wanted answers, George Stamer of Rockledge could offer hope to waiting families.

In September, Stamer received a phone call many can only dream of. His uncle, Master Sgt. Francis Stamer, successfully had his remains identified through a DNA match. A funeral complete with full military honors will take place next spring in Arlington National Cemetery....

Recently Accounted-For

The names listed here are U.S. military servicemembers who were once missing and are now accounted-for. Additional information may be seen by visiting the respective Vietnam, Korean War and WWII databases on this site.

These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • 1st Lt. Raymond O. Ball, U.S. Marine Corps, Company E, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was lost Nov. 27, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 13, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.

    Pfc. Paul L. Tingle, U.S. Army, Company I, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Nov. 26, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 12, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.

  • Cpl. Leland F. Smith, U.S. Army, Company K, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost Nov. 28, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 8, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Cpl. Richard L. Wing, U.S. Army, Company H, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost Nov. 28, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Nov. 7, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Master Sgt. Francis H. Stamer, U.S. Army, Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on Nov. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 29, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. Michael J. Barra, U.S. Army, Company C, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Feb. 20, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 23, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Capt. Richard W. Vincent, U.S. Marine Corps, Company D, 2nd Battalion, 18th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, was lost Nov. 20, 1943 in Tarawa. He was accounted for Oct. 21, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Capt. Richard L. Whitesides, U.S. Air Force, 19th Tactical Air Support Squadron, 34th Tactical Group, 13th Air Force, was lost March 26, 1964, in Vietnam. He was accounted for Oct. 21, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Pfc. Anthony R. La Rossa, U.S. Army, Company L, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Feb. 13, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 20, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Staff Sgt. James L. Van Bendegom, U.S. Army, Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, was lost July 12, 1967, in South Vietnam. He was accounted for Oct. 17, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • 2nd Lt. Jimmie D. Collins III, U.S. Army Air Forces, 446th Bombardment Group, Eighth Air Force, was lost on June 21, 1944, in the Netherlands. He was accounted for Oct. 15, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Cpl. Lonald D. Skeens, U.S. Army, Company E, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost Sept. 4, 1950, in South Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 11, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. Cameron M. Flack, U.S. Army, Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 12, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 8, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. Arnold Pitman, U.S. Army, Company L, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 12, 1950 in North Korea. He was accounted for Oct. 7, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
 
Finally home: WWII POW laid to rest after more than 70 years
Army Lt. Timothy Smith is stationed in Honolulu, near the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command. For soldiers there, it's part of their duty to occasionally ...
IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. NR-485-14
September 17, 2014
Soldier Missing from Korean War Accounted For
 
The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Arthur Richardson, 28, of Fall River, Mass., will be buried Sept. 18 in Arlington National Cemetery, Washington D.C. In January 1951, Richardson and elements of Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment (IR), 24th Infantry Division (ID), were deployed northeast of Seoul, South Korea, where they were attacked by enemy forces. During the attempt to delay the enemy forces from advancing, Richardson and his unit were moving towards a more defensible position, when his unit suffered heavy losses. It was during this attack that Richardson was reported missing.

When no further information pertaining to Richardson was received and he failed to return to U.S. control during prisoner exchanges, a military review board reviewed his status in 1954, and changed it from missing in action to presumed dead. In 1956, his remains were declared unrecoverable.

Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over with some of the boxes, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Richardson was believed to have died.

In the identification of Richardson's remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and Armed Forces DNA Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, to include mitochondrial DNA, which matched his niece and grand-niece.

Today, 7,880 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for
Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPMO web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1169.

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Recently Accounted-For

The names listed here are U.S. military servicemembers who were once missing and are now accounted-for. Additional information may be seen by visiting the respective Vietnam, Korean War and WWII databases on this site.

These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • Pfc. Richard N. Bean, U.S. Army, Company D, 1st Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division, was lost June 15, 1944, in Saipan. He was accounted for Sept. 4, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • 1st lt. William Cook and Sgt. Eric M. Honeywell, U.S. Army Air Forces, 599th Bombardment Squadron, 397th Bombardment Group, was lost Dec. 23, 1944, in Germany. They were accounted for Aug. 27, Aug. 28, 2014, respectively. They will be buried with full military honors.
  • Sgt. Lee H. Manning, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 1, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Aug. 26, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Pvt. Robert J. McConachie, U.S. Marine Corps, Company G, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marines Division, was lost June 15, 1945 in Okinawa, Japan. He was accounted for Aug. 19, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • 1st Lts. William D. Bernier, Bryant E. Poulsen, Herbert V. Young Jr., Sgt. Charles A. Gardner, Staff Sgt. John E. Copeland, and Tech. Sgts. Charles L. Johnston and Hugh F. Moore, U.S. Army Air Forces, 321st Bombardment Squadron, 90th Bombardment Group, 5th Army Air Forces, were lost April 10, 1944, in Papua New Guinea. They were accounted for July 18, July 16, Aug. 19, July 31, Aug. 2, Aug. 21, and Sept. 5, 2014, respectively. They will be buried with full military honors.

WWII Soldier’s Remains Linked To His Delray Beach Nephew

 

DELRAY BEACH (CBSMiami) – The remains of an American soldier, who fought in World War II, have been identified and brought back for a proper burial.

On June 15, 1944, Army Pfc. Bernard Gavrin was fighting with his troop for control of the Mariana Islands as part of an allied strategic goal. In the thick of the battle, the enemy forces conducted a suicide assault that killed or injured more than 900 soldiers.

Click here to watch the report.

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. NR-455-14
September 03, 2014

Soldier Missing From WWII Accounted For
 
The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

 Army Pfc. Bernard Gavrin, 29, of Brooklyn, N.Y., will be buried on Sep. 12, in Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C. On June 15, 1944, as part of an Allied strategic goal to secure the Mariana Islands, U.S. forces were ordered to occupy Saipan. After a month of intense fighting, enemy forces conducted a suicide assault, known as a banzai attack. This was designed to inflict as many casualties as possible against the 105th Infantry Regiment (IR), 27th Infantry Division (ID). During these attacks, elements of the 105th IR sustained heavy losses, with more than 900 soldiers killed or injured. Gavrin was reported missing in action on July 7, 1944.

 On July 8, 1945, with no new information concerning Gavrin or 21 other service members of the 105th IR, investigators issued a presumptive finding of death. In November 1948, the American Graves Registration Services (AGRS) reviewed the circumstances of Gavrin's loss and concluded his remains were non-recoverable.

 In September 2011, a private archaeological company excavated land near Achugao Village, Saipan, and uncovered human remains of an American serviceman from the July 7, 1944, battle. These remains were identified as Army Pvt. William Yawney, 23, of Freemansburg, Pa.

 In September 2013, a Japanese non-governmental organization interested in recovering Japanese soldiers from the battle in Saipan, alongside the same private archaeological company from 2011, recovered human remains and personal effects belonging to American servicemen, from an unmarked burial located a few meters from the 2011 excavation site. The remains were handed over to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC).

 In the identification of Gavrin's remains, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools including dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA, which matched Gavrin's cousin. Along with Gavrin, Army Pfc. Richard L. Bean, 24, of Manassas, Va., was accounted for.

 For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPMO web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1169.

http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/the-70-year-road-home/?id=168102

The 70-Year Road Home

SIOUX FALLS, SD - 

More than 73,000 World War II soldiers are still missing, according to the Department of Defense Prisoner of War office. Yet, one family we spoke with has finally been able to bring their solider home after he was buried overseas for almost 70 years.

Private First Class Lawrence Gordon was killed in Normandy, France a few months after D-Day. His family was told the 28-year-old man had died, but they didn't know where his body was. It took a stranger to change that decades later.

For 70 years, Lawrence Gordon's family could only tell stories about the former sheep rancher who enlisted in the U.S. Army after the Pearl Harbor bombings.

14 years ago, his nephew, who was named after Gordon, asked the United States Government for the location of his uncle's body. He was told that the solider was buried at the Brittany American Cemetery in France. The younger Gordon visited the cemetery, and found his uncle wasn't buried there. In fact, he was on the wall of missing soldiers....

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These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • 1st Lts. William D. Bernier and Bryant E. Poulsen, U.S. Army Air Forces, 321st Bombardment Squadron, 90th Bombardment Group, 5th Army Air Forces, was lost April 10, 1944, in Papua New Guinea. They were accounted for July 18, 2014, and July 16, 2014, respectively. They will be buried with full military honors.
  • Master Sgt. Lawrence O. Jock, Battery A, 955th Field Artillery, 8th U.S. Army, was lost July 14, 1953, in North Korea. He was accounted for June 25, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors Aug. 1, 2014, in Malone, N.Y.
  • Staff Sgt. Gerald V. Atkinson, U.S. Army Air Forces, 358th Bomb Squadron, 303rd Bomb Group, Eighth Air Force, was lost April 10, 1945, north of Berlin. He was accounted for June 20, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors Aug. 16, 2014, in Chattahoochee, Fla.
  • Cpl. Alva C. Groves, U.S. Army, Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost on April 14, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for June 12, 2014. He will be buried with full military Honors.
 
July 2, 2014
Family Wins Fight to Have WWII POW's Remains Brought Home
... has taken a long fight, and a lawsuit, to get Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command to dig up the remains and carry out DNA testing, ProPublica finds.

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William Bonner comes home

Posted: 28 Jun 2014 04:59 AM PDT

Hondo wrote about the news that Corporal William N. Bonner’s remains had been identified early last month. That blog post attracted the attention of CPL Bonner’s family and they sent us this local news article about the upcoming funeral and and the impact on the family and the community; Beryl cardinal is William’s sister, and […]

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N.D. soldier identified, to be buried in New Rockford

Jamestown Sun

... of Chosin, was identified last year by scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory....

...Army Cpl. Cletus R. Lies, a Bremen, N.D., native who died at age 26 in the 1950 Battle of Chosin, was identified last year by scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory.....

 

Commissioners Court approves displaying memorial for MIA veteran

Your Houston News

“His remains have not been found,” he said “We have the family's DNA on file with the POW MIA groups.” Everitt showed pictures to the court of a ...

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 3:43 pm

The Commissioners Court voted and approved a special commemoration to one of San Jacinto County’s veterans in their most recent meeting held on June 24.

Meritt Lilley fought in World War II and the Korean War and is to this day considered by some family members to be missing in action since 1950, although the military counted him officially as a fatality.....

June 19, 2014
Military IDs remains of 17 service members killed in 1952 plane crash

Alaska Dispatch

Members of a specialized investigative team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command wait as a UH-60 Blackhawk from Joint Base ...

 

IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Release No: NR-324-14
June 18, 2014

CORRECTION: DoD Announces Casualty Recovery

The Department of Defense announced today 17 service members have been recovered from a C-124 Globemaster aircraft that was lost on Nov. 22, 1952.

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Lawrence S. Singleton, Pvt. James Green, Jr., and Pvt. Leonard A. Kittle; U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Earl J. Stearns; U.S. Navy Cmdr. Albert J. Seeboth; U.S. Air Force Col. Noel E. Hoblit, Col. Eugene Smith, Capt. Robert W. Turnbull, 1st Lt. Donald Sheda, 1st Lt. William L. Turner, Tech. Sgt. Engolf W. Hagen, Staff Sgt. James H. Ray, Airman 1st Class Marion E. Hooton, Airman 2nd Class Carroll R. Dyer, Airman 2nd Class Thomas S. Lyons, Airman 2nd Class Thomas C. Thigpen, and Airman 3rd Class Howard E. Martin have been recovered and will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

On Nov. 22, 1952, a C-124 Globemaster aircraft crashed while en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, from McChord Air Force Base, Washington. There were 11 crewmen and 41 passengers on board. Adverse weather conditions precluded immediate recovery attempts. In late November and early December 1952, search parties were unable to locate and recover any of the service members.

On June 9, 2012, an Alaska National Guard (AKNG) UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter crew spotted aircraft wreckage and debris while conducting a training mission over the Colony Glacier, immediately west of Mount Gannett. Three days later another AKNG team landed at the site to photograph the area and they found artifacts at the site that related to the wreckage of the C-124 Globemaster. Later that month, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and Joint Task Force team conducted a recovery operation at the site and recommended it continued to be monitored for possible future recovery operations. In 2013, additional artifacts were visible and JPAC conducted further recovery operations.

DoD scientists from the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used forensic tools and circumstantial evidence in the identification of 17 service members. The remaining personnel have yet to be recovered and the crash site will continued to be monitored for future possible recovery.

For more information, please contact the service public affairs office. Army public affairs office can be reached at 703-614-1742. Navy public affairs office can be reached at 703-697-5342. Marine Corps public affairs can be reached at 703-614-4309. Air Force public affairs can be reached at 703-695-0640.

Note: The correct rank for the Air Force service members is Airman 1st Class Marion E. Hooton, Airman 2nd Class Carroll R. Dyer, Airman 2nd Class Thomas S. Lyons, Airman 2nd Class Thomas C. Thigpen, and Airman 3rd Class Howard E. Martin. Additionally 703-614-1742 is the correct number for the Army public affairs office and 703-697-5342 is the correct number for the Navy public affairs office.

Family prepares to bury remains of Korean War POW

SFGate

Military officials said scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used DNA from ...

 

DRY RIDGE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky family is preparing to bury the remains of a Korean War soldier, which were recently identified through DNA testing.

The Lexington Herald-Leader (http://bit.ly/T14FSP) reports the remains of Sgt. Paul M. Gordon will return to the U.S. on Tuesday and will be interred Friday at theKentucky Veterans Cemetery North in Williamstown.

Gordon joined the Army in 1949, shortly after graduating from Crittenden High School. He was sent to Korea, where he died in a prisoner of war camp in 1951 at the age of 20.

Family members say they wondered about his fate for decades.....

  • Pfc. Randolph Allen, Marine Corps, Company F, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, was lost on Nov. 20, 1943, in Tarawa. He was accounted for June 17, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors July 28, 2014, in Arlington National Cemetery.
  • Pfc. Cecil E. Harris, U.S. Army, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, was lost on Jan. 2, 1945, in France. He was accounted for May 29, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors. The date and location of the funeral are to be determined.
  • Staff Sgt. Robert E. Howard, U.S. Army Air Forces, 450th Bomber Squadron, 322nd Bomber Group, Medium, 9th Air Force, was lost on April 16, 1945, in Germany. He was accounted for May 28, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors July 19, 2014 in Moulton, Iowa.
  • Pfc. Lawrence S. Gordon, U.S. Army, Reconnaissance Company, 32nd Armored Regiment, 3rd Armored Division, was lost on Aug. 13, 1944, near Ranes, France. He was accounted for on May 27, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors summer 2014 in Canada.

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

5/28/14

 

Contact: Richard Jellerson

Storyteller Original Films

Cell: (213) 675-0813

Email: richard@storytellerfilms.tv

Website W/10 min Film Trailer at:

storytellerfilms.tv

   A NEW FILM

HONORS ARLINGTON FUNERAL  FOR KOREAN WAR VET

 

- Funeral 5/29/14

- Remains Returned Home After 63 Years

- 83,281 Missing in Action Still Unaccounted For Since WW II

 

Yesterday, film producer, Richard Jellerson, traveled from California to Washington DC and tomorrow, along with his film crew, will be at Arlington National Cemetery to film and record the military funeral for Army Private First Class (PFC) James R. Holmes, who served in Korea with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.

 

PFC Holmes was taken Prisoner of War on December 1, 1950, died while in captivity and his remains were accounted for on January14, 2014. He was returned home after 63 years and will be buried with Full Military Honors in Arlington on May 29th. Richard will also be conducting interviews with family members and members of Veteran’s groups and representatives of the DOD office of POW/MIA accountability and will aslo film and take interviews at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

 

The film is entitled “A Solemn Promise, America’s Missing in Action” and it will share stories like PFC Holmes’ about: America’s 83,281 still unaccounted for POW/MIAs; the stories of their family members still awaiting word after decades of not knowing if their loved ones were dead or alive; and the stories of those, whose job it is to locate, identify, return, and bury – with full military honors – America’s fallen warriors.

 

The Title’s term “A Solemn Promise”, refers to the one given to military members before entering into combat – a reminder…”We will leave no one behind”…but, as you can see, that was not true for over 83,000 who are still out there somewhere in or near former battlefields.

 

The film is  being produced by Richard’s company; Storyteller Original Films and there is a 10-minute trailer on the company’s website at: storytellerfilms.tv Richard, a veteran himself - flying 2 tours of duty in Vietnam -serving the last tour as personal pilot for General Creighton Abrams - previously produced a very popular History Channel special entitled “The Personal Experience - Helicopter Warfare in Vietnam”.

=================================================================

May 25, 2014
Middleton man's tireless effort outflanks military to bring Army vet home
After butting heads with the Department of Defense Joint POW-MIA Accounting Command and the Defense POW-MIA Office since 2012, Henry said, ...

====================================================================
News Release
Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office (Public Affairs)
Washington, DC 20301-2900

Phone: (703) 699-1169
IMMEDIATE RELEASE Fax (703) 602-4375
May 21, 2014

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. James R. Holmes, 18, of Warren, Ohio, will be buried May 29, in Arlington National Cemetery, Washington D.C.

In November 1950, Holmes was a member of Company K,3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, which was pushing north through North Korea to the Yalu River. In late November the unit was attacked by enemy forces and withdrew south to the town of Anju. On December 1, Holmes was declared missing in action. As part of a 1953 prisoner exchange known as Operation Big Switch, returning U.S.service members reported that Holmes had been captured by the Chinese during that battle and died in 1951, in prisoner of war camp known as Camp 5, near Pyoktong, North Korea.


Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain 350 - 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents turned over with some of the boxes indicated that some of the remains were recovered from Pyoktong County, near the area where Holmes was believed to have died.

To identify Holmes' remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used  circumstantialevidence and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial DNA, which matched his sister and brother.

Today, 7,883 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over byNorth Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPMO web site
at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1169.

 

 
Korean War MIA from Warren identified
To identify Holmes' remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, ...
 
Remains of Warren Korean War MIA Army veteran identified
To identify Holmes' remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, used ...
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/american-world-war-ii-soldier-lawrence-gordons-remains-confirmed-through-dna-testing/
 

After 70 years, fallen WWII soldier will finally come home

For nearly 70 years, the fate of U.S. Army Pfc. Lawrence Samuel Gordon's remains was a mystery. Gordon's family knew he'd been killed on August 13, 1944 during the failed attempt to surround the Germans at the Falaise Gap in France. He was one of 44 casualties in his reconnaissance division. The remains of 43 were identified and returned to their families or buried overseas. Gordon was the only one unaccounted for ... until now.

On Monday, forensic DNA experts positively identified the remains of a soldier mistakenly buried as an unknown in a German cemetery in France as Gordon. But the announcement didn't come from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), the beleaguered U.S. agency tasked with finding and identifying the remains of 83,000 war dead dating back to WWII -- an agency that had a budget of around $100 million in 2012 and identified the remains of just 80 fallen soldiers. The identification of Gordon was carried out by a handful of volunteer researchers and forensic scientists who spent a total of about $25,000 to find and identify his remains....

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These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • Cpl. Lucio R. Aguilar, U.S. Army, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for on May 6, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors in Corpus Christi, Texas.

    Staff Sgt. David R. Kittredge, U.S. Army Air Forces, 450th Bomber Squadron, 322nd Bomber Group, Medium, 9th Air Force, was lost on April 16, 1945, in Germany. He was accounted for on April 23, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors summer of 2014 in Green Bay, Wis.

    http://www.armytimes.com/article/20140812/NEWS/308120045/WW-II-soldier-Wisconsin-burial

    GREEN BAY, WIS. — The remains of a World War II soldier from Wisconsin have returned to Green Bay nearly 70 years after his death.

    Relatives of Army Air Force Staff Sgt. David Kittredge accepted his cremated remains from an Army honor guard Monday. They escorted the remains to the Nicolet Memorial Gardens in the Town of Scott.

    Kittredge of Oneida was born in 1922 and served as a radio operator during the war. His B-26 bomber was shot down in April 1945.

    Human remains from the crash were discovered in Germany in 2012. The Armed Forces DNA identification lab identified Kittredge.

    A memorial service with full military honors is scheduled for 2 p.m. Wednesday at the memorial gardens.

    Cpl. Harold W. Reed, U.S. Marine Corps, Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was lost on Nov. 29, 1950. He was accounted for on April 22, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors on May 24, 2014, in Toledo, Ohio.

  • Sgt. Richard John Archambeault, U.S. Army, Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on Nov. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for on April 29, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors. The date and location of the funeral are to be determined.

    Cpl. William N. Bonner, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on May 31, 1951, in North Korea. He was accounted for on April 22, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors summer 2014, in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

    • Cpl. Richard Isbell, U.S. Army, Company H, 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, was lost on April 25, 1951 in South Korea. He was accounted for on April 17, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Pfc. Arthur Richardson, U.S. Army, Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, was lost on Jan. 1, 1951, in South Korea. He was accounted for on March 21, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors.
  • Cpl. William S. Blasdel, U.S. Marine Corps, Company H, 3rd Battalion, 11th Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was lost Oct. 28, 1953, in North Korea. He was accounted for March 10, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors spring 2014, in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.
  • Cpl. William F. Day, U.S. Army, Company C, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for on March 6, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors April 5, 2014 in La Center, Ky.
  • Capt. Douglas D. Ferguson, U.S. Air Force, 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron, was lost on Dec. 30, 1969, in Laos. He was accounted for March 5, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors May 2, 2014 in Lakewood, Wash.
  • Sgt. Paul M. Gordon, U.S. Army, Company H, 2nd Battalion. 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost on Jan.7, 1951, in South Korea. He was accounted for Feb. 12, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors June 20, 2014, in Williamstown, Ky.
  • Pfc. Donald C. Durfee, U.S. Army, Company M, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Jan. 30, 2014. He will be buried March 6, 2014, in Rittman, Ohio.
  • Sgt. 1st Class John C. Keller, U.S. Army, Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on Nov. 2, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Jan. 29, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors May 2014, in Florida National Cemetery.
  • Pfc. William T. Carneal, U.S. Army, Company D, 1st Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, was lost on July 7, 1944, in Saipan. He was accounted for Jan 21, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors April 25, 2014 in Paducah, Ky.
  • Pfc. James R. Holmes, U.S. Army, Company K, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 1, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Jan. 14, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery in May 2014.
  • Cpl. Cristobal Romo, U.S. Army, Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost Dec. 12, 1950, in North Korea. He was accounted for Jan. 13, 2014. He will be buried with full military honors in Riverside, Calif., March 22, 2014.

March 2014
Army Pfc. Donald C. Durfee, 19, of Painesville, Ohio. In November 1950, Durfee was assigned to Company M, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, when his unit was attacked and forced into a fighting withdrawal south of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. He was reported killed-in-action on Dec. 2, 1950.

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 Phone: (703) 699-1169
IMMEDIATE RELEASE Fax (703) 602-4375

Jan. 3, 2014

SOLDIER MISSING FROM KOREAN WAR ACCOUNTED FOR

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Joe W. Howard, 23, of Philadelphia will be buried Jan. 9, in Jacksonville, Fla.. In November 1950, Howard was a member of Company A, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division (ID), when his unit was attacked by Chinese forces near Kunu-ri, North Korea. On November 30, the 2nd ID disengaged enemy forces to withdrawal south. Howard was reported missing Dec. 1, 1950, near vicinity of Kunu-ri.

In 1953, as part of prisoner exchange, known as Operation Big Switch, returning U.S. service members reported that Howard had been captured by the Chinese and died due to malnutrition while in captivity in 1951, in Prisoner of War Camp 5 near Pyoktong, North Korea.

During Operation Glory in September 1954, United Nations and Chinese forces exchanged the remains of war dead, some of which were reportedly recovered from POW Camp 5 at Pyoktong.

A military review board in December 1954 declared the remains as unidentifiable and transferred them to Hawaii to be buried as unknown in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the “Punchbowl.”

In 2012, due to advances in technology, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) determined that the possibility of identifying the remains now existed. The unknown remains were disinterred for analysis and possible identification.

To identify Howard’s remains, scientists from JPAC used circumstantial evidence and  forensic identification tools, such as dental comparison, which matched Howard’s records.

Today, 7,896 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1169.

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