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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

2017
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

2017

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Sgt. James W. Sharp U.S. Army Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 1/10/2017
2nd Lt. Charles E. Carlson U.S. Army Air Forces 62nd Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force 12/23/1944 Germany 1/9/2017
1st Lt. William J. Gray William J. Gray 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group 4/16/1945 Germany 1/5/2017
Mr. Peter W. Atkinson Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 10/25/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. Maxx C. Hammer, Jr. Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/22/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. John D. Armstrong Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/8/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
2nd Lt Ernest Matthews U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. James O. Whitehurst U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. Larry Roberts U.S. Marine Corps Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force 11/25/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Gunnery Sgt. Sidney A. Cook U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Cpl. Walter G. Critchley U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Mess Attendant 1st Class Ralph M. Boudreaux U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/3/2017
1st Lt. William C. Ryan U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Marine Fighter Attack Force 115, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force Pacific 5/11/1969 Laos 1/3/2017

      Note:  the above chart is now updated in it's entirety regularly after it was noticed that names were INSERTED in the chart long after the accounted for date, changing the original chart.
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

posted 01/13/2017                       Source:    http://www.dpaa.mil/OurMissing/RecentlyAccountedFor.aspx

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 January, 2017 11:02
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. James W. Sharp, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In late November, 1950, Sharp was a member of Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Because Sharp could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 6, 1950.

Sharp's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning Sharp as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Feb. 17, 1954.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Sharp's remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

During the 25th Joint Recovery Operation in 2001, recovery teams conducted operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses.  The site was approximately one kilometer from the 31st RCT's defensive perimeter.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human remains of at least seven individuals.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: FW: FW: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:52:38 +0000
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>


In the words of the late Paul Harvey – “and now….. the rest of the story!” – the full story surrounding the final day of the most recent announced recovery of Lt. Carlson.   
Compliments of ‘barney’ former B-52 pilot and a participant in ‘Linebacker II’ – December 1972.

 

Enjoy the read

 

From: barney
Sent: 10 January, 2017 12:37
To: Moe Moyer <jmoyer@usocentralflorida.org>
Subject: RE: FW: Airman Missing From World War II
Accounted For

 

The Wolfpack of the 62nd Squadron had a good day, though, losing only Lieutenant Charles E. Carlson for 34 German kills.

 

P-47 Pilot

 

http://www.56thfightergroup.co.uk/62pilots/abell-ducey/index.html

 

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: FW: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
Date: Tue, January 10, 2017 11:10 am
From: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>

Welcome HOME 2nd Lt. Carlson!

A Salute to HISTORY FLIGHT for their continued commitment to the accountability of our Missing in Action.


-----Original Message-----
From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 January, 2017 11:28
Subject: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Charles E. Carlson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 23, 1944, Carlson was a P-47 pilot with the 62nd Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force, and was shot down south of Bonn, Germany, during an air battle between American and German pilots. His wingman believed that Carlson had bailed from the plane. German officials reported finding and burying Carlson's remains at the crash site near Buschhoven, Germany.

An investigation after the war by the American Graves Registration Command in 1948 found material evidence and eyewitness testimony linking a crash site near Buschhoven to Carlson's plane. However, efforts to find his remains at the site were unsuccessful.

In March 2008, an independent German researcher contacted the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA) with information regarding a plane crash near Buschhoven. He informed analysts that a local German resident had found parts of an aircraft and other material evidence consistent with a P-47 aircraft.

Between May 2008 and September 2009, JPAC historians conducted more interviews of potential eyewitnesses and research on the site of the crash. Based on information gathered during this work, JPAC investigators recommended excavation of the Buschhoven site for possible remains.

In October 2015, an independent organization, History Flight, Inc., conducted a preliminary investigation of the crash site. Through a partnership agreement with DPAA, History Flight conducted recovery efforts between Feb. 2, 2016 and May 17, 2016, where they found material evidence, aircraft wreckage and possible human remains. The remains were accessioned to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

Cpl. Luis P. Torres U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 9/1/1950 South Korea 12/15/2016

News Releases

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Torres)

17-002 | January 06, 2017

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Luis P. Torres, 20, of Eagle Pass Texas, will be buried January 13 in San Antonio. On Sept. 1, 1950, Torres was member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his battalion had its position overrun by enemy forces along the east bank of the Naktong River, South Korea. During this attack, Torres was reported missing in action near Changyong, South Korea.

Torres’ name did not appear on any prisoner of war list, but one returning American prisoner of war reported that he believed Torres was held captive by the enemy and was executed. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 3, 1954.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Torres’ remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

On Dec. 20, 1950, a set of unidentified remains, previously recovered from a shallow grave near Changnyong, were buried in the Miryang United Nations Military Cemetery as “Unknown X-331.” In February 1951, the remains were moved to the Tanggok United Nations Military Cemetery. Although Torres was considered a candidate for identification, the remains were not identified due to a lack of substantiating evidence. The remains were then moved to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu and buried as Unknown.

On May 16, 2016, the remains were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Torres’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial and anthropological evidence, as well as DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA analysis through the Next Generation Sequencing technique, which matched a brother, a sister and a nephew.

Today, 7,764 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:10
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pfc. James O. Whitehurst, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Whitehurst was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Whitehurst died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Whitehurst's remains were not recovered.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:11
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for. 

In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Roberts' remains were not recovered. On Oct. 11, 1949, a military review board declared Roberts' remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:12
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Sidney A. Cook, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Cook was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Cook died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Cook's remains were not recovered. On Feb. 8, 1949, a military review board declared Cook's remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:13
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Cpl. Walter G. Critchley, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Critchley was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Critchley died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Critchley's remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review board declared Critchley's remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Remains of Army Major Jack Griffiths, who died in a POW camp during the Korean War, finally being returned home. -- Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:09
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve 2nd Lt. Ernest Matthews, missing from World War II, has now been identified.

In November 1943, Matthews was assigned to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Matthews died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Matthews' remains were not recovered. In 1949, a military review board declared Matthews' remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

American Missing From World War II Accounted For (Hammer)

By | January 05, 2017

 

Mr. Maxx C. Hammer, Jr., missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In mid-1941, Hammer was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China. He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the “American Volunteer Group,” (AVG) and popularly known as the “Flying Tigers.” The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft. In September 1941, Hammer was among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma. Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat. To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles. Hammer was killed during a training flight on Sept. 22, 1941, when his plane crashed on its way back to the airfield after a heavy rainstorm.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG. The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948. The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful. They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-634 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

American Missing From World War II Identified (Atkinson)

By | January 05, 2017

 

Mr. Peter Atkinson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

 

In mid-1941, Atkinson, formerly in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve, was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China. He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the “American Volunteer Group,” (AVG) and popularly known as the “Flying Tigers.” The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft. In September 1941, Atkinson and two other pilots were among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma. Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat. To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles. Atkinson was killed during a training flight on Oct. 25, 1941, when his plane was reported to have disintegrated in a dive.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG. The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948. The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful. They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-635 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.
DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 05 January, 2017 08:51
Subject: American Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Mr. John D. Armstrong, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In mid-1941, Armstrong, formerly in the U.S. Navy Reserve, was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China.  He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the "American Volunteer Group," (AVG) and popularly known as the "Flying Tigers."  The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft.  In September 1941, Armstrong was among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma.  Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat.  To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles.  Armstrong was killed during a training flight on Sept. 8, 1941, when his plane collied with another AVG member's aircraft in midair.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG.  The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948.  The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful.  They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-633 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 13:09
Subject: Soldier Mising From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. Edward Saunders, missing from the Korean war, has now been accounted for.

On the night of Feb. 11 and 12, 1951, Saunders was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, and was attached to the Republic of Korea Army's 16th Regiment to provide support during a planned offensive, when they were attacked by the Chinese People's Volunteer Force (CPVF).  Both units retreated east, joining U.S. units at Saemal, South Korea.  The regiment continued to fight the CPVF along the withdrawal route to Hoensong.  By the end of the battle, only six soldiers remained.  It was during this battle that Saunders was reported missing in action. 

Following the war, one returning American prisoner of war reported that he and Saunders had been captured on Feb. 12, 1951, and that Saunders died sometime in August 1951 in Koksan, North Korea.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Aug. 31, 1951.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Saunders was believed to have died.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 13:08
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. 1st Class Eugene J. Colley, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In late November, 1950, Colley was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 2, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Following the withdrawal, fighting continued.  Because Colley could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

Colley's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning Colley as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Colley's remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea, based on information provided a Korean witness.  The site was in the vicinity of Twikkae Village.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human remains of at least five individuals.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 08:49
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Mess Attendant 1st Class Ralph M. Boudreaux, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for

On Dec. 7, 1941, Boudreaux was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Boudreaux.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Boudreaux.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

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From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 08:22
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Department of Defense has accounted for Army Maj. Jack D. Griffiths, 31, of San Diego, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried Jan. 11 in his hometown.

A family friend, Michael Draper, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at 619-867-8079.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Griffiths on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

///////

On Nov. 30, 1950, Griffiths was a member of Headquarters, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action in the vicinity of Somin-dong, North Korea.

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Griffiths died and was buried at Camp 5, Pyoktong, North Korea.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Griffiths deceased.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory." All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit for analysis.  A set of remains designated as X-14411 were unable to be identified and were interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the "Punchbowl."

In November 2013, the grave where X-14411 was buried was exhumed and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis. 

To identify Griffith's  remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used Next Generation Sequencing DNA analysis, which matched two sisters and a brother, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

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Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Griffiths)

17-001 | January 04, 2017

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Maj. Jack D. Griffiths, 31, of San Diego, will be buried January 11 in San Diego. On Nov. 30, 1950, Griffiths was a member of Headquarters, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action in the vicinity of Somin-dong, North Korea.

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Griffiths died and was buried at Camp 5, Pyoktong, North Korea. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Griffiths deceased.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called “Operation Glory.” All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army’s Central Identification Unit for analysis. A set of remains designated as X-14411 were unable to be identified and were interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the “Punchbowl.”

In November 2013, the grave where X-14411 was buried was exhumed and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Griffith’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used Next Generation Sequencing DNA analysis, which matched two sisters and a brother, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,764 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 14:04
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pvt. Gene J. Appleby, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for. 

On Sept. 17, 1944, Appleby was a member of Company A, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, as part of Operation Market Garden.  The regiment was tasked with landing at Drop Zone "T," north of Groesbeek, The Netherlands.  Appleby successfully jumped and was seen on the ground by members of the unit.  However, as the soldiers rallied to move toward their objective, Appleby was seen struck by enemy fire.  Following the attack, he was listed as missing in action, and declared him deceased as of Sept. 18, 1945.

On Sept. 8, 2011, the Royal Netherlands Army Recovery and Identification Unit (RIU) was notified by the Groesbeek Police of possible human remains found at the Groenendaal Farm by local residents.  Officials conducted an excavation and recovered possible human remains and material evidence.  The remains were transferred to the Joint Personnel Accounting Command, now DPAA, for identification.

Historians from DPAA working on cases of missing Americans from Operation Market Garden received valuable recovery information from the RIU and traveled to the original recovery site with the local researchers who originally found the remains.  With this information, the DPAA historians established a list of individuals whose circumstances of loss and last known location matched the remains.  Appleby was among the top candidates. 

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 10:17
Subject: CORRECTION: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Glaydon I.C. Iverson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Iverson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Iverson.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Iverson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 10:03
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Coxswain Verne F. Knipp, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Knipp was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Knipp.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Knipp.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis. DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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