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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

 

List posted 07/28/18

 
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.

 

2018

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Pfc. Morris R. Worrell U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment 9/27/1942 Philippines 8/16/2018
Pfc. George L. Spangenberg U.S. Army Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr. US. Army Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/12/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Leo J. Duquette U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/11/1950 South Korea 8/8/2018
Aviation Chief Ordnanceman Otis E. Ingram U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 8/8/2018
Pfc. John A. Taylor U.S. Army Company C, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 8/7/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Wilbur C. Barrett U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/2/2018
Pfc. Leslie E. Shankles U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 10/14/1944 Germany 7/30/2018
Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson U.S. Army Air Forces 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group 12/23/1944 Austria 7/27/2018
Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/26/2018
Pfc. Merton R. Riser U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/26/2018
1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell U.S. Army Air Forces 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force 1/27/1944 France 7/25/2018
2nd Lt. Martin F. O'Callaghan, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 96th Fighter Squadron, 82nd Fighter Group 2/14/1945 Slovenia 7/24/2018
Pvt. John B. Cummings U.S. Army Company A, 276th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division 12/31/1944 France 7/23/2018
Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 7/23/2018
Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/23/2018
Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/20/2018
Cpl. Albert E. Mills U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 7/25/1950 South Korea 7/17/2018
Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn U.S. Army Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 4/30/1951 North Korea 7/16/2018
Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 7/13/2018
Col. Frederic M. Mellor U.S. Air Force Reserve 30th Tactical Squadron/ 15th Tactical Recon Forces 8/13/1965 Vietnam 7/13/2018
Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/20/1950 South Korea 7/12/2018
Pfc. Joe S. Elmore U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 7/5/2018
Pfc. Willard Jenkins U.S. Army Company C, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division 9/20/1944 The Netherlands 7/5/2018
Pvt. Donald E. Brown U.S. Army Company A, 745th Tank Battalion 7/28/1944 France 6/29/2018
2nd Lt. Hulen A. Leinweber U.S. Army Air Forces 40th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group 6/10/1945 Philippines 6/29/2018
Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/28/2018
Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty-One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 6/28/2018
Pfc. Roger Gonzales U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/26/2018
Sgt. James K. Park U.S. Army Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division 11/23/1944 Germany 6/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr. U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Pfc. Robert K. Holmes U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/12/2018
Fireman 1st Class Lewis F. Tindall U.S. Naval Reserve USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/6/2018
Pfc. Paul D. Gilman U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/5/2018
Cpl. Morris Meshulam U.S. Army Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Master Sgt. Carl H. Lindquist U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/4/2018
Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran U.S. Army Air Forces 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 2/25/1941 Slovenia 5/31/2018
Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 5/31/2018
Lt. Cmdr. Larry R. Kilpatrick U.S. Naval Reserve Attack Squadron One Hundred Five (VA-105) 6/18/1972 Vietnam 5/18/2018
Sgt. John W. Hall U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battlion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 5/16/2018
Ensign Harold P. DeMoss U.S. Naval Reserve Fighting Squadron 100 (VF-100) 6/23/1945 O'ahu Hawaii 5/11/2018
Cpl. DeMaret M. Kirtley U.S. Army Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 5/11/2018
Seaman 2nd Class William V. Campbell U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941   5/10/2018
Sgt. Melvin C. Anderson U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Cpl. Joseph Akers U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Shopfitter 3rd Class John M. Donald U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/8/2018
Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2018
Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/3/2018
Pfc. William F. Cavin U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 5/2/2018
Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/11/1945 Germany 4/27/2018
Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 4/27/2018
Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris U.S. Army Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 11/28/1944 Germany 4/26/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum U.S. Army Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/24/2018
Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/23/2018
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2018
Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte U.S. Army Air Forces 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force 8/1/1943 Romania 4/16/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/13/2018
Pfc. John H. Walker U.S. Arny Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry DIvision 11/24/1944 Germany 4/13/2018
Gunners Mate 3rd Class Marvin B. Adkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/11/2018
Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/10/2018
Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/9/2018
Sgt. Eugene W. Yost U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 9/3/1950 South Korea 4/9/2018
Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser U.S. Marine Corps Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 4/6/2018
Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan U.S. Army Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 4/3/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews U.S. Army Air Forces 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force 5/29/1943 France 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/26/2018
Capt. George Van Vleet U.S. Army Air Forces 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group 1/21/1944 Tarawa 3/22/2018
Sgt. Donald L. Baker U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/20/2018
Col. Peter J. Stewart U.S. Air Force Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing 3/15/1966 Vietnam 3/19/2018
Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/16/2018
Cpl. James I. Jubb U.S. Army Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/10/1950 South Korea 3/14/2018
Sgt. Julius E. McKinney U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 3/14/2018
Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz U.S. Army Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 9/28/1944 Netherlands 3/14/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2018
1st Lt. William W. Shank U.S. Army Air Forces 338th Fighter Squadron 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force 11/13/1943 Germany 3/6/2018
Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 5/30/1945 Japan 2/28/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 2/20/2018
Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile U.S. Army Comapny E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/20/2018
Pfc. Joe Lukie U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 2/16/2018
Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 2/14/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/13/2018
Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/8/2018
Pfc. David Baker U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/8/2018
Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 2/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Pfc. Jack H. Krieger U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/31/2018
Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/31/2018
Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/26/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon U.S. Army Gompany G, 8th Cavalry Regiment 9/5/1950 South Korea 1/19/2018
Pfc. Lamar E. Newman U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/27/1950 North Korea 1/19/2018
1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford U.S. Army Air Forces 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 12/17/1944 Croatia 1/19/2018
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018
Col. Edgar F. Davis U.S. Air Force 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing 9/17/1968 Laos 12/30/2017

Posted  08/20/18

  08/20/18  
 
Editor's note: Michael Dolski is a historian with the Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency. The department requires that he submit ...
 
 
that would provide $10 million for POW/MIA identification. Senators have introduced a slew of other amendments to bill, which leaders have paired ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 20 August, 2018 10:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: New Mexico Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, accounted for on May 22, will be

buried August 22 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

 

Duran, 22, of El Rito, New Mexico, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Stanley Evans, of Santa Fe, is available for interviews at (505)

982-3204.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Duran on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In February 1944, Duran was a nose gunner on a B-24H Liberator, assigned to

the 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air

Force.  On February 25, 1944, the final day of Operation Argument, Duran's

aircraft came under attack by German fighters and anti-aircraft fire, while

he was on a bombing mission targeting Regensburg, Germany.  The tail gunner

in another aircraft witnessed a direct hit on Duran's aircraft, which tore

off a section of the right wing.  Nine of the ten crew members were able to

bail from the aircraft before it crashed.  The tail gunner from Duran's

aircraft reported he had last seen Duran alive in the aircraft, but believed

Duran did not bail out.  All nine of Duran's crewmates survived the bail out

and were captured and interrogated in Verona, Italy, where they were told

that one body had been found in the aircraft wreckage.  The crash site was

reported to be located near Ljubljana, Slovenia, an area then under Axis

control.

 

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Service, Mediterranean

Zone, of the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for the remains of U.S.

service personnel in Europe, as part of the global effort to identify and

return them for honored burial.  No remains could be associated with Duran,

and he was declared deceased as of Feb. 25, 1944.

 

In 2006, analysts began research on Duran's loss after receiving information

concerning a B-24 Liberator that had reportedly crashed near the village of

Pokojišče, municipality of Vrhnika, Slovenia.  A team from the Defense

POW/Missing Personnel Office, a predecessor of DPAA, visited the alleged

crash site in 2012 and interviewed residents who reported the remains of an

unidentified Allied airman from that crash site were initially buried along

the side wall of Saint Stephens Church in Pokojišče, and that the grave was

regularly tended to by Mrs. Tončka Dragar, who cordoned it off with stones

and regularly laid flowers on the mound.

 

The team was then shown a headstone erected in 1962 at the back of Saint

Stephens Church, indicating that the unidentified Allied airman, by then

portrayed as an Australian airman, had been reburied together with four

Partisan soldiers, two of whom were also unidentified. 

 

In 2016, with information provided by several private Slovenain researchers,

DPAA concluded that the remains were likely those of Duran.  Because there

was a possibility that the remains were of an Australian, DPAA invited the

collaboration of the Office of Australian War Graves Commission (OAWG) and

Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Directorate of History and Heritage. 

 

Upon concurrence from the OAWG and RAAF, and with the gracious permission of

Father Janez Šiler, the Parish Priest of St. Stephens, the families of the

Partisan soldiers believed to have been buried in the alleged mass grave,

the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs, and Equal

Opportunities, and the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage of

Slovenia, in July 2017 a DPAA recovery team excavated several alleged burial

sites adjacent to the church in Pokojišče, recovering possible osseous

remains. 

 

To identify Duran's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as material and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs,

and Equal Opportunities, the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage

of Slovenia, the residents of Pokojišče, the several private Slovenian

researchers involved, Tončka Dragar, Ambassador Brent Hartley, the Office of

Australian War Graves Commission, and the RAAF Directorate of History and

Heritage for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Duran's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery in Impruneta, Italy, along

with other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

08/19/18
 


 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Thursday that Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn was assigned to the USS ...
 
This spring, Wade's family learned that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has identified their relative's remains, as well as others of his ...
08/17/18
 

 
... 200 servicemen would be sent back to the U.S. by North Korea, the mayor wrote a letter to the Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

 

 
The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr., 21, of West Greenville died on ...

 

 
The envelope from Hawaii is postmarked Dec. 6, 1941. Inside is the last letter 19-year-old Marine Pfc. Robert Kimball Holmes sent home to his father ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 August, 2018 07:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured and Killed During World War II Accounted For (Worrell, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Morris R. Worrell, captured and killed during World War II, was

accounted for on August 13.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1605102/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-worrell-m/

 

On Dec. 8, 1941, Worrell was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st

Infantry Regiment, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands.

Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on

April 9, 1942, and of the Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942. Thousands of

U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner; including many who

were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner

of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan on the island of

Luzon, Philippines. Worrell was among those reported captured after the

surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW

camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the remaining years

of the war.

 

Interment services are pending; a formal notification will be released 7-10

days prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Worrell's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila

American Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will

be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Worrell's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Ll5vEAC.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Indiana Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, accounted for on Nov. 17,

2017, will be buried August 21 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Glenn, 43, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His great niece, Danielle Myers, also of Fort Wayne, is available for

interviews at (260) 615-9076.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Glenn on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Glenn's 43rd birthday, he was assigned to the USS Oklahoma,

which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Glenn. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Glenn.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Glenn's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, along

with circumstantial evidence.  Glenn was the 100th identification made by

DPAA of the USS Oklahoma casualties.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Glenn's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Spangenberg, G.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. George L. Spangenberg, killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on August 14.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1603758/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-spangenberg-g/

 

In November 1950, Spangenberg was a member of Company E, 8th Cavalry

Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 2,

1950 following a battle in Unsan, North Korea, the days prior.

Spangengberg's name was never included on lists of American Soldiers being

held as prisoners of war by the Korean People's Army (KPA) or the Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF,) and no returned American prisoners of war

had any information on his status.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Spangenberg's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the

Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Spangenberg's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004o2sEAA

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Ball, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr., killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on August 14.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1603755/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-ball-m/

 

In July 1950, Ball was a member of Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry

Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North

Korean forces near Choch'iwon, South Korea. Ball could not be accounted-for

and was declared missing in action on July 12, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ball's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Ball's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000007PrFBEA0

08/15/18
 

 

 

 
Forty-five years after American Prisoners-of-War returned to the U.S. following ... the Director of the Defense for the POW and MIA Accounting Agency....

 
08/14/18
In 1994, a dig by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency) [http://www.dpaa.mil/] uncovered several ...

 

 
Funding for the study was provided by the Army Research Office and the Defense Biometrics and Forensics Office to support the Defense POW/MIA ...

 

 
Ketchum was recently identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Office, and returned home Sunday for burial in Calvary Cemetery, almost 68 ...

 

 
... mission into Wonsan, North Korea, to retrieve the remains and deliver them to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in the United States.

 

 
After the repatriation of the last remains, the US Department of Defense (of which the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency forms a part), along with ...

 
At the meeting Thursday, director of the Defense Pow/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) Kelly McKeague, a retired Air Force major general, told the ...

 

 
Shortly after, he became a P.O.W and died in November of 1942. ... Many people came out to remember his story, including veterans, POW/MIA riders ...
After 75 years a Germantown born Marine has finally returned home to Philadelphia.

Marine Pvt Emil F. Ragucci was given a police escort to the John F. Murray in Flourtown, PA for his full honors burial tomorrow in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 3301 W. Cheltenham Ave., Philadelphia. PA.

https://youtu.be/IIii1Wpd5z8

 
 
Semper fidelis,

Patrick
God Bless America

 
I am writing in regard to the removal of the Bible from the POW/MIA display at F.E. Warren Air Force Base. Four generations of our family have served ...

 

 
Nearly 20 years later, the remains were disinterred and transported to The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which seeks to ...

 

 
Forensic expert Dr. Timothy McMahon is working with the Defense POW/MIA accounting agency or D-P-A-A to identify the fallen heroes.

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is responsible for attempting to identify unaccounted U.S. military personnel dating back to World ..

 

 
American remains go to the sophisticated Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's Forensic Identification Laboratory at Oahu in Hawaii to try to identify ...

 

 
Ketchum was identified in April by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Office. "It's a miracle," said Mary Jo Edge, Ketchum's daughter. Because it is an ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 August, 2018 08:32
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, Jr., 35, accounted for on March 19,

will be buried August 18 in his hometown.

 

Van Vleet, 35, of Fresno, California, Was killed during World War II.

 

His daughter, Ann Wagner, also of Fresno, is available for interviews at

(559) 439-7918.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Van Vleet on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Jan. 21, 1944, Van Vleet was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron,

(Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Betio Island,

Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when the B-24J bomber aircraft he was aboard

crashed shortly after take-off. 

 

Following the crash, the squadron's physician recovered the remains of six

individuals who died in the crash and interred them in Cemetery No. 33 on

Betio Island, one of several cemeteries established on the island. 

 

Following the war, the U.S. Army's 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and

1947.  Using Marine Corps records, they began the task of consolidating all

the remains from isolated burial sites into a single cemetery called Lone

Palm Cemetery.  The remains of the crew on the B-24J bomber were believed to

be among those moved, however Van Vleet's remains were not identified and he

was declared non-recoverable.

 

On Nov. 7, 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-014 from the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In May 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA returned

to Betio to conduct excavations of remains of men buried after the battle.

One set of remains was consolidated with the remains disinterred from X-014

and was sent to the lab for analysis.

 

To identify Van Vleet's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis, which matched his family, dental, and anthropological analysis,

which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., the Department of Veterans Affairs

and the Republic Kiribati of for their partnerships in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Van Vleet's name is recorded on the

Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, site along with the other MIAs from

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 August, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, accounted for on Jul 3, will be buried August 18 in

Albany, Kentucky.

 

Elmore, 20, of Seminary, Kentucky, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Debbie Bowlin, is available for interviews at (270) 791-7877.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Elmore on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

Elmore could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in

action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Elmore's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning

Americans reported him as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of

evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of May 1, 1953.

 

On Oct. 19, 1995, during a United Nations Command/Korean People's Army

meeting at Panmunjom, the KPA offered to repatriate the remains of a British

soldier killed during the Korean War.  The KPA identified the remains to be

Pvt. J. Edmunds, who was reportedly found by a KPA work crew in July 1995,

near Wangsan, Rimkangni, Kaesong City.  The remains were handed over on Oct.

30, 1995, and the British government asked DPAA's predecessors to identify

the remains.

 

On Feb. 28, 1996, the remains were declared unidentifiable. 

 

On Sept. 1, 1997, the British Army Headquarters Adjutant General, Personnel

and Training Command, sent a request to the Adjutant General, U.S. Army

Personnel Command, requesting the remains be returned for burial in Busan,

South Korea, during the visit of the British Korean Veterans Association to

Korea in April 1998.  The remains were transferred to the custody of British

authorities and were buried in a grave marked as "British Unknown."

 

Following the institution of the Korean War Project, DPAA was able to

associate the unknown remains with two missing U.S. service members. 

 

In November 2017, the remains were disinterred by the 8th Army Mortuary,

U.S. Forces Korea and transported to DPAA.

              

To identify Elmore's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial

evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the British government and military authorities and

South Korean government for their partnership in this mission.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Elmore's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Elmore's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000RlYQJEA3

 
American troops in war zones have received combat pay since 1952. Yet for one group of warfighters — Korean War POW-MIAs — the supplemental ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lists 165 men from Wisconsin unaccounted for in the Korean War. According to the agency, more than ...
 
   
   
 
... ballistic missile (ICBM) test fire, dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations.
 
 
... dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations, Xinhua news agency reported.
 

 
American troops in war zones have received combat pay since 1952. Yet for one group of warfighters — Korean War POW-MIAs — the supplemental ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lists 165 men from Wisconsin unaccounted for in the Korean War. According to the agency, more than ...

 

 

 

 

 

 
... ballistic missile (ICBM) test fire, dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations.

 

 
... and Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, deputy director of the POW/MIA Accounting Agency, attend at a ceremony marking the arrival of the remains believed to ...

 

 
... dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations, Xinhua news agency reported.
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 9 August, 2018 08:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Duquette, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Leo J. Duquette, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

on Aug. 8, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1597529/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-duquette-l/

 

In July 1950, Duquette was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st

Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against North Korean forces near Choch'iwon, South Korea. Duquette could not

be accounted-for and was declared missing in action on July 11, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Duquette's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Duquette's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000007kTRyEAM

 

Sent: 8/8/2018 6:18:11 PM Eastern Standard Time
Subject: Great Podcast with Ann Mills-Griffiths (POW/MIA Families) and Kelly McKeague, Head of DPAA

Hi All, (Please pass this along to others)

 

Below is a link to a podcast from 8/2/18 - this is one of the best presentations I have heard about the recovery of Americans troops who are Still Missing & Uncounted for…it will give hope to POW/MIA families, Veterans and to those presently serving in the Military.

 

An exceptional job by all 3 interviewees:

1. Retired Air Force Maj Gen Kelly McKeague Head of DPAA

2. Ann Mills-Griffiths, Head of National League of POW/MIA Families

3. Mr. Bryan Bender, Defense Editor for Politico, Author (You Are Not Forgotten…)

4. The interviewer is a Guest Host, Celeste Headlee…also did a great job.

 

The interviews are on a podcast at the link below (once there, Click on the word “Listen” in an orange box)

 

 

Best to all, Bill Fortier

 


 

 

 
The remains – believed to be of U.S. servicemen killed in the Korean War – were taken to a lab in Hawaii run by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
WASHINGTON (Circa) Watch live in the video player below as both the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical ...

 

 
The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency has spent years explaining their work to them and giving them updates on their individual ...

 

 

 

 
... believed to be 55 US soldiers recently returned to the US by North Korea. Today Defense officials Department POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the ...
... MIA service members who went to Korea from the Berkshires by comparing a list maintained by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in Hawaii ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is reporting that Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum will be buried next Tuesday. The 38-year-old was ...
 

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said in a news release Tuesday that Lane was co-piloting a B-17 bomber when it was hit by anti-aircraft ...
 

 

 

 

 
After the ceremony, pallbearers loaded the cases onto a C-17 headed to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam where the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 

 

 
Soon afterward, Mary Hoff joined the National League of POW/MIA Families, an organization founded by two wives of POW/MIA troops, Karen Butler ...

 

 
They have been transferred to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's lab for identification. However, more than 7,800 U.S. military personnel ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday that Col. Frederic Mellor was accounted for last month after the government of ...

 

 
The Pentagon-ordered merger created the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, with one chain of command and one budget. Read more at: ...

 

 
As Dr. John Byrd, chief scientist of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, put it ... Others perished in distant Chinese or North Korean POW camps.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 09:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, accounted for on April 23, will be

buried August 14 in his hometown.

 

Ketchum, 38, of Superior, Wisconsin, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His daughter, Mary Edge, also of Superior, is available for interviews at

(715) 392-3031.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Ketchum on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th

Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry

Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled

into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the

Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers

of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces

withdrew south.  The U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service

members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing

in enemy territory. McKinney was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950,

when he could not be accounted for after the withdrawal to Hagaru-ri.

 

Ketchum's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning

Americans reported Ketchum as a prisoner of war. Based on the testimony of a

surviving member of his unit who witnessed Ketchum's death, the U.S. Army

declared him deceased as of Dec. 6, 1950.

              

In September 2001, a joint U.S. and Korean People's Army (KPA) recovery ream

conducted a Joint Recovery Operation (JRO) in the vicinity of the Chosin

Reservoir, Changjin County, Chagjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North

Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses.  During the

excavation, the recovery team recovered material evidence and possible

osseous remains of at least seven individuals.  The remains were

subsequently sent to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Ketchum's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome

(Y-STR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, and material and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Ketchum's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Ketchum's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000004PGRHEA4

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 09:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Pennsylvania Marine Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Emil F. Ragucci, accounted for on Nov. 13, 2017,

will be buried August 14 in his hometown.

 

Ragucci, 19, of Philadelphia, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in

World War II.

 

His nephew, Charles Ragucci, is available for interviews at (610) 203-2272.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Ragucci on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Ragucci was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 2nd

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Ragucci died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance the

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Ragucci's

remains were not recovered. On Oct. 24, 1949, a military review board

declared Ragucci's remains non-recoverable.

              

In September 2013, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., JPAC (a

predecessor to DPAA) received the remains of a group that had been located

in the known area of Cemetery 33.  The remains were sent to the Central

Identification Laboratory in Honolulu for analysis.

              

To identify Ragucci's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and

material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Ragucci's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 12:11
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Flight Officer Richard W. Lane, accounted for on April 23,

will be buried August 9 in Gage, Nebraska.

 

Lane, 21, of Beatrice, Nebraska, was killed during World War II.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Lane on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In December 1944, Lane served with the 815th Bombardment Squadron, 483rd

Bombardment Group (Heavy), 15th Air Force.  He was killed on Dec. 27, 1944

when the B-17G aircraft he co-piloted was shot down on a bombardment mission

over Austria.  As Allied aircraft neared the target at Linz, Austria, they

encountered heavy anti-aircraft fire.  Lane's aircraft took a direct hit

over Linz and reportedly crashed near St. Florian, Austria. 

 

Lane and three other crew members were listed as buried in St. Florian

Cemetery on Dec. 29, 1944.

 

In May 1945, the American Graves Registration Command, in an effort to

investigate unresolved casualties that occurred in Europe, concluded that

one of the Airmen in Lane's aircraft was the only unresolved Airman killed

in close proximity to the recovery locationW of X-239.  Based on this

information, X-239 was disinterred but dental analysis was unable to make a

positive association with the Airman.  The remains were then reinterred in

the United States Military Cemetery Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, on Aug. 2,

1950.

 

In June 1945, the AGRC recovered four sets of remains from a single grave

near the cathedral in the St. Florian Cemetery.  The AGRC was able to

identify one set of remains, designating the others as Unknowns X-59, X-60

and X-61.  The unidentified remains were transferred to the temporary

cemetery in Nurnberg, Germany. 

 

In August 1945, unknown remains were disinterred from the Nurnberg cemetery

for reprocessing and moved to the U.S. military Cemetery at St. Avold,

France, where they were redesignated as X-239, X-240, X-241 and X-242 St.

Avold. 

 

In January 1946, the Quartermaster General identified the remains designated

X-240 to be Lane, subsequently burying them in the Filley Cemetery in Gage

County, Nebraska.

 

Based on DPAA's analysis of historical documents, it is likely that the

remains designated X-239 and X-240 became exchanged during or immediately

after the August 1945 movement to St. Avold. 

 

On June 8, 2017, a team from the U.S. Army Regional Mortuary-Europe/Africa,

working with the American Battle Monuments Commission, exhumed X-239 from

the Henri-Chapelle Cemetery.  The remains were transferred to DPAA for

analysis.

 

To identify Lane's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission, as well as to Lane's family for their support.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. 

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
 
-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Korean war POW's compensation act
Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2018 09:14:43 -0400
From: Monica Cash <mavector4@gmail.com>

Please share and ask that people contact their members of Congress 
 
https://www.stripes.com/news/bill-seeks-combat-pay-for-korean-war-pows-that-was-capped-during-captivity-1.541233
 
 
Divers conduct a mission for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to investigate the underwater wreckage of an aircraft located near the coast of ...
 
As far as the return of Americans missing in action, or MIA, in the Korean War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) reported:.
 
 
Team and authorities from the United Nations Command with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) secure United Nations flags over the ...
 
 
... bunch of fallen Americans home,” said Rear Admiral Jon Kreitz, the deputy director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, according to CNN.

 

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says DNA testing as well as dental and anthropological analysis helped identify his remains, which were ...

 

 
World War II, the Vietnam War, and the wars in Iraq also need family members, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Immediate ...

 

 
... according to the medical examiner summary report from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is part of the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

 
Obviously, they have never read or been a part of the POW/MIA ceremony that states, in part, “the Bible serves to remind us of the comfort of faith ...

 

 
He is the 149th USS Oklahoma crew member to be identified through the efforts of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency laboratory at Offutt Air ...

 

THE NEW YORK TIMES


How the Defense Department Identifies the Remains of Our War Dead

By John Ismay Aug. 2, 2018

 

On Wednesday, two military cargo planes carrying 55 aluminum coffin-shaped cases landed at Hickam Air Force Base in Oahu, Hawaii.


Inside are presumed to be the remains of American service members who died in North Korea between 1950 and 1953 during the Korean War....

Fri, 3 Aug 2018 20:25:15 -0400

 

moe note:

I cannot tell you how many times in the past week we all have been subject to the press/journalistic question “Why 55 sets of remains? Didn’t the President say something about 200 sets of remains?” ‘Why are the boxes covered with a UNITED NATIONS Flag in lieu of an AMERICAN Flag?’    

I may sound biased, perhaps because I am. John Zimmerlee , for over two decades, has offered his expertise on the Korean War POW/MIA issue to Families of those still waiting on answers from our Government, i.e. DoD, DPMO, JPAC, DPAA, and he has made these same government units aware of his research in our own Government Archives specifically noting the improper classification of over 1000 military personal from the Korean War, i.e. Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered (KIA/BNR) when the Unit records indicate Missing in Action (MIA) or Captured (POW).

As Noted by Hal – let’s see if the infamous single “Dog Tag” matches a name on John’s list of 55. For the sake of the 55 Families I truly hope it is a match.

Until they all come home……….

 


 
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/08/02/remains-received-from-north-korea-consistent-with-being-us-service-members-pentagon-says.html
 

...The Pentagon exclusively showed Fox News military equipment that was found among the remains, including several pairs of boots, two helmets, several canteen bottles, dozens of buttons, buckles, a bayonet handle, socks and one pair of what appeared to be fingerless gloves.

One dog tag from a U.S. Army soldier was among the recovered equipment, and two sons of the deceased soldier will receive the dog tag next week.

Most of the remains returned to the U.S. were from the village of Sinheung Ri, near the Chosin Reservoir. The site hosted a famous battle fought from November to December of 1950 during the Korean War....


 

 
Kelly McKeague, director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency; Navy Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, the agency's deputy director; and Dr. John Byrd, ...

 

 

 

 

 

 
The younger Brady was just 59 days old when the plane carrying his father was hit by flak during a bomb run, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...

 

 
Kelly McKeague, Director, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which oversees the search for American prisoners of war and missing in action; ...

 

 
According to the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the 26-year-old John Brady was one of nine airmen on a mission to Merseburg ...

 

 
But the government lab with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which accounts for Americans lost in conflict, faces a challenge, ...

 

 
U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Feltz, mortuary affairs specialist assigned to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, secures a U.S. flag onto a ...

 

From: Ann Mills-Griffiths <powmiafam@aol.com>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 17:21
Subject: Re: DPAA Press Briefing at Pentagon on DPRK Remains

 

Click on this link to see Kelly McKeague, DPAA Director, and Dr. John Byrd (from Hawaii) on a live DoD briefing to interested press.   Kelly begins with a statement, then opens the floor to questions, and the entire press conference is one hour long.  You'll learn a lot, mostly about the remains of assumed US personnel unaccounted-for from the Korean War and the prognosis for the future, as well as ID's on those returned.  It is worthwhile.   Best to all, Ann

 



https://www.defense.gov/live/#/?currentVideo=16342

 

Try this in case you are not successful with the above - https://www.defense.gov/Videos/

This is a 55 minute press conference video.

 

 

Ann Mills-Griffiths

Chairman of the Board/CEO

National League of POW/MIA Families

5673 Columbia Pike, Suite 100

Falls Church, VA  22041

703-465-7432

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 14:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Georgia Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, accounted for on April 13, will be buried Aug.

11 in his hometown.

 

Fuller, 20, of Toccoa, Georgia, was captured and killed during the Korean

War.

 

His grand-niece, Amy Hix is available for interviews at (706) 224-3531.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Fuller on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army

attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an

area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea.  After enduring sustained

enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea.  It was

during this withdrawal that Fuller was reported missing, as of Feb. 12,

1951.

 

In December 1951, Fuller's name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and

Korean People's Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their

custody.  Following the war, a fellow soldier from the same company reported

that he had been held prisoner with Fuller, but was unaware of his status.

When Fuller was not returned after the armistice, the U.S. Army declared him

deceased as of Feb. 18, 1954.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the

remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who died during the war. On May 20,

1990, North Korea turned over five boxes of remains believed to be

unaccounted-for servicemen from the war.

 

To identify Fuller's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological and chest radiograph comparison

analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Fuller's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Fuller's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004nzUEAQ

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 14:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Pennsylvania Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. William A. Larkins, accounted for on May 4, 2017, will be buried

Aug. 10, in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania.

 

Larkins, 20, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Larkins on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Larkins was a member of A Battery, 503rd Field

Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting off persistent Chinese

attacks in the Ch'ongch'on River region of North Korea.  Through a series of

attacks, the Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) pressed 2ID units into local

withdrawals to avoid being outflanked.  On the night of Nov. 25, 1950, the

Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) began relentless attacks which

continued until the end of the month.  On Dec. 1,1950, the 503rd FA BN began

their movement down the Main Supply Route under continuous enemy mortar,

small arms and machine gun fire, toward the town of Sunchon, where Larkins

was reported missing in action.

 

Following the war, one returning prisoner of war reported that Larkins had

been captured and had died at an unknown prisoner of war camp in January

1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of

Jan. 31, 1951.

 

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA,) and

KPA Recovery Team conducted the 37th Joint Field Activity in Unsan County,

North Pyongan Province, North Korea.  A site southeast of the

Pukchin-Tarigol Prisoner of war camp cluster was found to have probable

human remains and material evidence, and was completely excavated.  The

remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis on May 27, 2005.

 

To identify Larkins' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome short

tandem repeat (Y-SYR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as dental

and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery

of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Larkins' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004qm5EAA

 

 
1, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Jerick Johnson, lead driver and spokesman for the POW-MIA Freedom Car, part of a national awareness campaign honoring ...

 

 
The remains will be examined at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, and experts there will be responsible for identifying the remains.

 

 

 

 
Vice President Mike Pence and Navy Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, deputy director of the POW/MIA Accounting Agency, right, watch as military members carry ...

 

 
... are bound for a forensic laboratory run by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in Honolulu, for testing that may finally offer answers to families ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or D.P.A.A., which is tasked with investigating and recovering fallen military personnel, announced the ...

 

 
... Tuskegee Airmen and one of just 27 who went missing during the war, have been found in Austria, per the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Shankles, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Leslie Shankles, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

July 12, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589682/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-shankles-l/

 

In October 1944, Shankles was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th

Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. He was killed Oct. 14, 1944 by

enemy fire in the Raffelsbrand sector of the Hürtgen Forest, near Germeter,

Germany.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Shankles’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Margraten, Netherlands, along with the others missing from WWII. Although

interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Shankles’ grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Goldtrap, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on June 1, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589679/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-goldtrap-c/

 

In November 1943, Goldtrap was assigned to Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor

Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Goldtrap died on the first day of the battle, Nov.

20, 1943, during the first wave of the assault.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Goldtrap's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Goldtrap's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XknREAS

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Zehetner, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner, killed during World War II,

was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589633/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-zehetner-r/

 

In November 1943, Zehetner was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Zehetner died on the first day of the battle, Nov.

20, 1943.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Zehetner's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Zehetner's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XllWEAS

 
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/07/29/dna-to-x-ray-to-id-remains-from-north-korea-military-has-range-tools.html

DNA to X-ray: To ID remains from North Korea, military has a range of tools

...The military has been collecting DNA from such family members since 1992, and has reached the relatives of 92 percent of the 8,100 service members who were listed as missing at the end of the Korean War, McMahon said....

 
Kelly McKeague, director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ... Friday to the National League of POW/MIA Families and veterans groups
   
 
In their joint statement, Trump and Kim agreed that the United States and North Korea would “commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the ...

 
Please download the attached PDF for a list of Louisiana military personnel still unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 
The return of United States' forces remains from North Korea could help bring closure for some family members decades after their loved ones went ...

 

 
FAIRFIELD — Most “ceremonial flags” approved by the Board of Supervisors will be flown at the Solano County sites with three poles for one week, ...

 

 

 

 
MSG Chinn's nephew and great nephew were at today's POW MIA Awareness Rally to welcome him home. "I was actually shocked. I was surprised.

 

 
On Wednesday, they're scheduled to arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, where they'll be turned over to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) had been investigating the possibility that human remains and other items found at a crash site in ...

 

 
Since 2011, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) analyst Joshua Frank has been taking a new look at World War II crash sites in Italy, the ...

 
 
2016 story

 

 

Hopeful reaction over return of Korean War remains

MATT SAINTSING

JULY 27, 2018 - 2:49 PM

 

A meaningful first step. Hopeful, but with a watchful eye. Joy for the families of the fallen. 

These are the reactions from veterans and advocates on the first tangible outcome of President Donald Trump's efforts to bring home American war dead from the Korean peninsula, 65 years to the day after combat ended. 

“This is a huge step in the right direction that we hope will finally bring peace to the peninsula and closure to American families who have been waiting more than six decades for their loved ones to return home from their war,” said VFW national commander Vincent B.J. Lawrence. 

 

[PIC -  A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster, a cargo aircraft, carried the remains that landed at the U.S. Osan Air Base, just south of the Seoul on Friday. ]

Joe Anello, a U.S. Army Korean War veteran and former prisoner of war in Korea said he was “cautiously optimistic” when it comes to this latest gesture from Pyongyang. 

“I’m very happy they’re returning them if they are in fact our men. I know it will mean a lot to the families,” he said. “And that means a lot to me because, as you know, I buried friends there.”

But Anello remains skeptical, however, given that North Korea has been using American remains as “bait.” “They use them whenever they think they can get some kind of advantage, or get some kind of favor with us for negotiations,” he said. 

The remains will be carefully transferred to a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency office in Hawaii, where forensic experts will begin the tedious task of identifying them. North Korea has, in the past, the mixed U.S. remains with non-human carcasses. 

Read here about the respectful transfer of  the 55 caskets from North Korea to the U.S.

To ensure the remains could be positively identified as American, the VFW is urging families of Korean War missing to provide a DNA sample to the Defense Department. 

“Identifications can be made through strong circumstantial evidence, but nothing says proof-positive better than an actual DNA match,” said Lawrence. 

According to the VFW, DNA reference samples from families only account for 91 percent of Korean War mission. And, they’re calling on family members to submit a reference sample, “in the hope that the next identification announcement is their long-lost soldier, sailor, airman, or Marine.” 

Relatives can contact a military service casualty officer for information on how to provide a sample at the following phone numbers:

  •  U.S. Army: (800) 892-2490
  •  U.S. Marine Corps: (800) 847-1597
  •  U.S. Navy: (800) 443-9298
  •  U.S. Air Force: (800) 531-5501

“We owe it to their families and we owe to their battle buddies,” added Lawrence. 

It’s going to be a long process, says Ann Mills-Griffiths, chairman, and CEO of the National League of POW/MIA. 

“Concrete answers bring an end to uncertainty, and the uncertainty about a missing loved one is what motivates all the questions and effort after all these years,” said Mills-Griffiths, whose brother is still missing from Vietnam.

“If you can get identifiable remains and have a funeral here in the United States then that brings finality, it’s a tremendous relief."

Listen here to our interview with Korean War POW Joe Anello.

Phil Briggs contributed to this report.

Contact us about this article or share your story at gethelp@connectingvets.com.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 July, 2018 15:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Riser, M.)

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Merton R. Riser, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1586864/

marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-riser-m/

 

In November 1943, Riser was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine

Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Riser died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Riser's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Riser's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000LlnTEAS

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 July, 2018 17:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Tuskegee Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Dickson, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

U.S. Army Air Forces Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson, killed during World War II,

was accounted for on July 27.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1587017/
tuskege
e-airman-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-dickson-l/

 

In December 1944, Dickson was a pilot with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd

Fighter Group, in the European Theater.  On Dec.23, 1944, Dickson departed

Ramitelli Air Base, Italy on an aerial reconnaissance mission toward Praha,

Czechoslovakia.  On his return, Dickson's P-51D aircraft suffered engine

failure and was seen to crash along the borders of Italy and Austria,

reportedly between Malborghetto and Tarviso, Italy.  According to witnesses,

Dickson's plane had rolled over with the canopy jettisoned.  He was not

observed ejecting from the plane.  Dickson's remains were not recovered and

he was subsequently declared missing in action.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of Austria, the University of

New Orleans, the University of Innsbruck, and Mr. Roland Domanig, for their

partnerships in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Dickson's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Impruneta, Italy, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Dickson's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe6eEAC

 

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/trump-may-have-been-played-by-north-korea-on-mia-soldier-remains

 

07/27/2018 07:59 AM CDT
 
 

U.S. Receives Fallen Service Members’ Remains From North Korea

DoD News, Defense Media Activity

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2018 — The United Nations Command with support from U.S. Forces Korea today repatriated 55 cases of remains of fallen U.S. service members returned by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, also known as North Korea, according to a news release.

A U.S. cargo aircraft flew to Wonson, North Korea, to receive the remains and returned promptly to Osan Air Base, South Korea, the release said.

“It was a successful mission following extensive coordination,” United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea commander Army Gen. Vincent K. Brooks said in the release.

“Now, we will prepare to honor our fallen before they continue on their journey home,” Brooks added.

Brooks will host a full honors ceremony for the fallen service members August 1. Immediately following that ceremony, the remains will be flown to Hawaii for further processing under the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

The UNC in Korea remains committed to enforcing the 1953 U.N. Armistice Agreement to return fallen service members, the release said.

“The United States owes a profound debt of gratitude to those American service members who gave their lives in service to their country and we are working diligently to bring them home” according to a statement released by the White House. “It is a solemn obligation of the United States government to ensure that the remains are handled with dignity and properly accounted for so their families receive them in an honorable manner.

“Today’s actions represent a significant first step to recommence the repatriation of remains from North Korea and to resume field operations in North Korea to search for the estimated 5,300 Americans who have not yet returned home,” the statement added.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 July, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Kvidera, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera, killed during the attack

on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 3, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1586040/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-kvidera-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kvidera was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Kvidera.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Kvidera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Kvidera's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XdztEAC

From: McKeague, Kelly K SES DPAA FO (US)
Sent: 26 July, 2018 22:16
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Update on Korean War Unaccounted-for in DPRK

Ladies and Gentlemen,

As you all know, the joint statement by President Trump and Chairman Kim
issued as a result of their summit in Singapore included a commitment to
repatriating and recovering remains of US service members from the DPRK.
Since then, we have been actively engaged with US Government partners to
ensure fulfillment of this pledge.  Many thanks to those of you for publicly
emphasizing the importance of this humanitarian endeavor.  Your efforts
certainly contributed to the DPRK's commitment, as the President had
previously alluded to.

We are pleased that a few hours ago the DPRK turned over 55 boxes containing
the possible remains of missing DoD personnel to the United Nations Command.
Four anthropologists and one forensic photographer from DPAA conducted a
preliminary review of the remains at Wonsan Airport prior to being
transported to joint US-RoK air base at Osan on an USAF aircraft.

During the next few days, those scientists will perform a more detailed
field forensic review, and on Aug 1, the remains will be honorably carried
onto two USAF aircraft for their return to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in
Hawaii.  After the dignified ceremony, the remains will be accessioned into
our laboratory where in-depth forensic analyses will begin.

We have not yet reached an agreement with the DPRK regarding future field
recoveries; however, we are working closely with our DoD, State Department,
and National Security Council partners on this matter.  Our collective goal
is to commence field operations in the DPRK next Spring.

Of the 400+ U.S. remains either unilaterally turned over by the DPRK in the
early 1990s or recovered during DoD's 1996-2005 operations in North Korea,
over 337 individuals have been identified, accounted-for and returned to
their families for burial with full military honors.  The most recent of
these occurred this past April.

We are guardedly optimistic about the weeks and months ahead, as we endeavor
to bring long-awaited answers to more families who lost loved ones in the
Korean War.

We look forward to seeing some of you at next month's Korea/Cold War
Government Briefings in Arlington, VA.

Best regards,
Kelly


Kelly McKeague
Director, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

"Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise"

moe note; we must remember to not get caught up in the media hype of recent ‘progress’ in the POW/MIA issue with North Korea. Mark is trying to keep us ‘grounded’ on this issue. Since the Armistice signing, 65 years ago, we have been looking for answers on 8,000 plus American Military. The North Koreans have ‘HELPED’ us with the repatriation of approximately 1,000 sets of Remains , dating back to 1954, of which we have NOT reached the halfway point on identifying them yet, but what about our Last Known Alive (LKA)!?? We know from the returning POWs in 1953 that their were other Americans that were Alive and in the Camp with them but they did NOT make the exchange. North Korea has dangled the ‘carrot’ of Remains in our face many times over the last six decades, but somewhere close to 75% of the original MIA Cases remain open.

Let’s do our best to help those that still wait by staying focused on the Mission and the Truth.

 

 

On 7/26/2018 6:41 PM, markasauter@gmail.com wrote:
 

FYI, see below notes from our book re DPRK and remains:

One reason DoD has to be careful in receiving remains from Pyongyang is that the regime has engaged in deception operations involving them in past – including “salting” sites to be excavated by the US – in one case, see below, a “battlefield’ remains was discovered with its cranium glued together. At least one other had been prepared for use as a lab skeleton. The North Koreans buried them beforehand at locations the US had paid to search.

North Korea may claim the remains to be returned this week were “discovered” by farmers, but US intel reports indicate the North Koreans have warehoused perhaps hundreds of US remains to, IMO, in effect sell back to us.

The North Koreans have also sent back mingled and misidentified remains and, in one alleged case, animal remains claimed to be a UN ally POW/MIA.

Finally there is the issue of the glacial pace of Pentagon identifications of Korean War POW/MIA. DPAA, the Pentagon POW/MIA agency, has still not identified all the remains North Korea returned in 1954. Some Korean War POW/MIA family members are demanding the “new” remains be sent to private labs, fearing they – the POW/MIA loved ones – will be dead before the remains are identified if left in the hands of the Pentagon.

The info below is from 2013 and in most cases the situation has not changed.

 

Mark Sauter and John Zimmerlee

 
 

Remains & Unfinished Business

 

“Wrong body sent home?”

Category in Pentagon List of Korean War POW/MIA Remains

 

 

In 2007, the Pentagon identified human remains recovered from an infantry battlefield in Kujang County, North Korea, by a combined team from North Korea and the Pentagon’s Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC). Among those identified was Col. Douglas Hatfield, a Korean War MIA. This might not seem exceptional, except for the fact that when Hatfield went missing, he was aboard a B-29 bomber that crashed some 80 miles away from where his body was found. This raises an obvious question: How did an aviator’s body end up in infantry fighting position? And why did one set of US remains from the site (it’s unclear if they were Hatfield’s or another aviator) show signs of death from a plane crash, instead of a ground battle?

 

It appears Hatfield’s remains, along with others, were “salted” by the North Koreans. In other words, Pyongyang buried remains where Americans were scheduled to dig. The North Koreans didn’t even try hard to make it appear natural. “At one DPRK recovery site, glue was detected on recovered remains, apparently used to reconstruct a cranium. Other remains had been drilled or cut, suggesting the remains were prepared for rearticulation (e.g., making a lab skeleton),” the 2012 internal “Cole Report” on JPAC notes. These salted remains, and others North Korea dug up itself and returned in boxes for American payments, were so badly excavated, contaminated and mixed up (in “shambolic” condition, says the report) it will take far longer to identify them, and likely prove impossible in many cases.

Despite untold millions of dollars spent over recent decades in the effort, JPAC has only “accounted for” 236 of over 8,000 Korean War POW/MIAs, averaging fewer than eight identifications per year. While North Korea, China and Russia stonewall American attempts to locate and recover remains overseas, more than 1,200 unidentified bodies are in American hands, but the Pentagon does not focus on identifying these men, to the fury of many family members.

JPAC’s remains recovery operation is “dysfunctional,” according to the scathing 2012 Cole Report, named after its author Dr. Paul Cole, a JPAC employee, management consultant and POW/MIA expert. The organization is also marked by waste, abuse and potential fraud. (It is important to mention here the deep appreciation owed to most Pentagon field personnel. Many leave their families for long periods to live in harsh conditions, often risking their personal safety, to recover lost American heroes across the globe. They are skilled service members and civil servants who do not bear responsibility for mismanagement from the top and misconduct by their peers.)

Our own investigation shows that families have not been informed of critical information, including that remains returned from the war were associated with their loved ones via dog tags or identification by North Korea. A Pentagon database reports the “wrong bodies” of Korean War missing were shipped home, raising the possibility loved ones received by families were actually the remains of someone else. In other cases, the Pentagon publicly announced men had been identified, but they are still carried as “unaccounted for.” Is this a mistake in the identifications or the list? Were families told? Sixty years after the end of the war, the remains of America’s Korean War POW/MIAs remain unfinished business.

U.S. Remains: a North Korean Natural Resource

By salting with the bodies of missing Americans, North Korea was apparently trying to ensure remains were discovered in places where Pyongyang wanted the Pentagon to dig. This kept US investigators away from places North Korea didn’t want them, while ensuring the Americans recovered remains and so kept paying for access. The “North Koreans have a considerable quantity of remains that they have systematically planted for later recovery,” Pentagon scientists concluded, according to the Cole Report. In 2008, a North Korean told visiting Senate staffers the country had remains of about 100 Americans, according to a Pentagon record. By other estimates, Pyongyang has excavated far more from the graves and death sites of thousands of Americans who died in North Korean prison camps and battlefields. “Hundreds” of American remains were already in a Pyongyang warehouse by the late 1980s, a Chinese official told the U.S.

Now, because of tensions in the relationship, Washington and Pyongyang are no longer working together to recover remains. But the North Koreans are patient. It may not be oil, but they know their ground contains a valuable resource.


<image015.jpg>


North Korea has taken clues from the strategy its ally Vietnam used to extract financial and diplomatic benefits from American war dead (though Pyongyang’s execution has been less sophisticated than Hanoi’s). The United States has paid North Korea more than $22 million for POW remains, access and excavations. Pyongyang has also used the issue to advance key goals, such as increasing direct contact with the US and reducing support for sanctions against the country. The remains issue has helped North Korea bypass the Armistice Agreement’s Military Armistice Commission, as Beijing was able to do after the war by negotiating directly with the US for captive POW political prisoners in China. Meanwhile, as Pyongyang tries to extract every concession it can from the remains while dragging out the process for years, America has provided it an estimated $1.3 billion in food and other aid.

 

Where Are the Remains?

Most unrecovered Korean War remains exist in North Korea, but there are others in South Korea and crash sites in China. We believe yet more rest near secret camp sites in China and the former Soviet Union, though, as discussed earlier, the Pentagon denies the existence of such camps.

But the location of one the largest concentrations of unidentified US remains from the Korean War surprises some people – it’s Hawaii.


<image016.jpg>
 

The Punchbowl is a Honolulu national cemetery in an extinct volcano crater (said to be the site of ancient Hawaiian human sacrifices), where unidentified remains the Communists exchanged in 1954’s “Operation Glory,” plus others found in South Korea, are buried. At last count, 853 unidentified remains rest there. Combined with others, mostly in the nearby Hawaiian labs of JPAC, at least 1,200 and by some reports up to 1,800 human remains from the Korean War are in US hands.

Who Will Live to See Them Identified?

With all those remains in hand, why has the Pentagon been identifying so few Korean War POW/MIAs every year? At current rates, everyone who ever knew a man missing from Korea could be dead before even the remains in American custody are identified.

One reason is policy. “DPMO (Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office) attempted to prevent JPAC from conducting disinterments for the purpose of identification,” according to the Cole Report, which says a senior DPMO official called disinterment “grave robbing.” As discussed below, some family members believe this is because the Pentagon has, in effect, buried its mistakes in the Punchbowl.

In March of 2013, DPMO held a regional update in Birmingham for family members of the missing. A senior leader of JPAC mentioned a Congressional goal to identify 200 remains per year (from all wars) by 2015. He quickly declared that federal budget “sequester” rules prevented his teams from excavating in foreign countries, thus ensuring the goal would not be met (he failed to mention JPAC’s  “dysfunctional” management and other systematic problems noted in the Cole Report.) 

Zimmerlee asked the JPAC official about remains in the Punchbowl, which obviously did not require foreign travel. DPMO’s senior leader, Montague Winfield, rose and took the microphone to declare the existence of special protocols for exhuming remains from there. Good prospects of identification must exist before exhumation (the phrase “likelihood of identification” is often used by Pentagon officials), he said, in order to show “respect” for the remains.

This brought some graying family members to their feet, incensed. Many had been waiting decades for identification of their loved ones and had not nearly that many years left. A family member declared: “The people in this room are the people who care most about the remains in the Punchbowl. If they are ever to be identified, it is most likely that they are a member of one of our families. If you truly respect these remains, then do what their families expect. Dig them up and put them in the lab. Then give them some attention and identify them. That is the ‘respect’ that they deserve!”

The crowd cheered.

To be fair, the Punchbowl remains were covered in formaldehyde in 1954 to preserve the bones for future identification. Ironically, the chemical makes DNA analysis difficult. In recent years, the Pentagon has made a major and often successful push to get DNA from the relatives of the missing. But even without easier DNA identification, x-ray, bone-matching “clavicle” techniques, dental and other diagnostics can be performed.

What the Pentagon did not share with the families is an internal study showing 91 remains in the Punchbowl have a “Very High Potential” for identification and 523 have “Potential” to be identified, according to the Cole Report, which also noted that Punchbowl cases are often easier and faster to identify. There is usually substantial information associated with these remains and Pentagon experts can pick the ones most likely to produce identification. “In August 2011, three unknowns exhumed from the Punchbowl were identified in less than one month,” according to the report.

So why aren’t more being identified?

X Files

Some nonprofit organizations and private researchers believe the Pentagon hoards remains and “supposedly lost” information that, if made public, would allow outsiders to generate useful data and increase identifications. Of greater concern, the military has failed to share information even with family members.

We have reviewed cases in which evidence suggests men carried as KIA had actually been captured and were seen alive after their reported “date of death.” In some cases, remains of these men had apparently been sent home. Certainly the reports of their captivity may have been wrong in some cases, but it’s also possible the military sent home someone else’s body.

More than 250 sets of still unidentified remains from Operation Glory have been associated with names of currently missing Americans. In other words, North Korea provided names for the remains it returned, and those names match men still missing. But the Pentagon did not tell all of the families.

Zimmerlee has shared this information with at least two dozen family members whose loved ones’ names are listed. None had been informed and all wanted to know, even if the information turned out to be wrong. The Pentagon appears to withhold the data because the names are often wrongly assigned and, in some cases, the remains have been identified as someone else. But the government does not make clear why families are better off not knowing the North Koreans somehow had their relatives’ name and service number. Even if the Koreans provided inaccurate information, their possession and use of the data may provide clues.

We have also uncovered documents showing that scores of Americans were “accounted for” in some manner by the Pentagon, but their status never changed. Despite evidence their remains returned home, they are still listed as “unaccounted for.”

For example, in 1956, while preparing for meetings in Geneva, the US government announced it had updated the list of missing based on analysis of remains from Project Glory. It said 56 Army soldiers and four Air Force personnel had been removed from the list for which America “demand(ed) accountability” (up to ten Marines may have also been accounted for in this phase.) Physically or forensically, Pentagon specialists had identified 60 men by examination of remains. Yet some of those names remain on the “unaccounted for” list. Were they really identified in the first place? And if so, were their families notified? We can’t tell.

Many “unidentified remains” are associated with information linking them to specific men, from name tags to computer analysis, but the Pentagon apparently does not always share this with family members.

Sometimes information leaks. Zimmerlee obtained documentation that a set of unidentified remains called “Masan KS X25” had been narrowed down by Pentagon investigators in 1955 to one of just three men: Sgt. Lee Henry, Pfc. John A. Taylor and Pfc. Robert D. Fogle. Such a case would seem to call for a renewed attempt at identification using modern technology and data.

The case of “Inchon X-20” proves illuminating. The remains belong to a Caucasian, 18-20 years old, about 5’ 8”, with brown hair. Investigators believed X-20 might be associated with Pfc. Edward E. Smedley, lost on September 20, 1950, or Pfc. Robert D Miller, who went missing three days later. However, a post-war search for dental records to confirm an identification came up empty. The remains were buried in the Punchbowl and forgotten.

As noted earlier, the Pentagon does not make it easy for Zimmerlee to share his information with other family members, but in this case he was able to track down Edward Smedley’s brother, Harold. With Harold’s encouragement, in early 2013 JPAC provided an extensive new evaluation of the X-20 remains using sophisticated computer software not available in decades past. Edward Smedley turned out not to be a match with X-20, but the software revealed he did share some common elements with 39 other remains and further investigation should be conducted.

How about Pfc. Robert Miller, the other possible match? Zimmerlee asked the Army Casualty office to let Miller’s family know about the new information. If the Army ever followed up, the Miller family did not come forward, as far as we can tell.

<image017.jpg>

 

POW Investigators Risk Their Lives in Expensive Global Operations While Hundreds of Unidentified Remains Sit in Hawaii

 

<image018.jpg>
 

Is This The Best They Can Do?

Pressure from Congress and the families has been building for years to increase the number of annual identifications for the estimated 83,000 Americans missing from World War II on. One goal was 200 identifications by 2015. “JPAC could fake everything except the identifications,” notes the Cole Report, the 2012 internal review of JPAC operations by noted POW/MIA expert Dr. Paul Cole.

The report was allegedly suppressed and in effect “banned” by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) leaders after its release, but we and the Associated Press were able to obtain information from it. The result: national headlines and more disturbing revelations.


<image019.jpg>
 

“The Pentagon's effort to account for tens of thousands of Americans missing in action from foreign wars is so inept, mismanaged and wasteful that it risks descending from ‘dysfunction to total failure,’ according to an internal study suppressed by military officials,” the Associated Press reported in early July 2013. Reporter Bob Burns discovered memos showing JPAC considered the Cole Report accurate, but the organization’s commander at the time decided to suppress it.

Even the current JPAC commander, Air Force Maj. Gen. Kelly K. McKeague, agrees it is accurate to call JPAC dysfunctional. “I'd say you're right, and we're doing something about it,” he told the AP in July 2013.

Among findings from the report (with some updates from the AP):

  • JPAC’s annual average number of identifications has dropped to 69 (for all wars, including Korea) from 85 in earlier periods; there is little chance it will come close to achieving 200 identifications per year;
  • The time an average case spends in the lab before identification has increased from four to 11 years;
  • In the last ten years, the lab has identified 115 individuals twice and one individual three times, part of a broader JPAC pattern of wasteful investigations of resolved cases;
  • The cost of each identification is set to rise and could in some scenarios reach $2.1 to $5.7 million per case (for men from all wars);
  • JPAC and DPMO suffer from overlapping responsibilities and continued bureaucratic infighting; and
  • JPAC is mismanaged and home to waste, abuse and possible fraud.

Essentially, there is little or no hope JPAC and its ostensible partner DPMO will meet the oft-cited Congressional goal of 200 identifications a year for POWs from all wars (senior DPMO official and retired Maj. Gen. Montague Winfield – who formerly commanded JPAC – emphasized to us in June 2013 there is actually no such Congressional goal to achieve 200 identifications per year. Rather, the goal is to achieve the “capacity and capability” to make that many identifications. We can see how Pentagon POW officials prefer to be graded on “capacity and capability” instead of hard numbers, but the point appears moot. Winfield said the Pentagon will fail even to achieve the “capacity and capability’ goal due to budget issues.)

Congress and the Pentagon reacted to public disclosure of the Cole Report with alarm. Pentagon leaders were unaware of many issues in the report, said a Pentagon spokesman, and an investigation would be conducted. Remarkably, the Pentagon placed the top official ultimately responsible for the POW issue in charge of the probe, in effect allowing him to investigate the failings of his own organization.

The report blames much of the problem on JPAC’s failure to find new remains likely to produce identifications. A main cause of the failure:  “a ‘military tourism’ procurement method.”  “Military tourism,” the report explains, is “a pattern of foreign travel, accommodations and activities paid for by public funds that are ultimately unnecessary, excessive, inefficient, or unproductive.”  In effect, travel boondoggles.

The investigation reveals large amounts of money and untold man hours spent on trips that produced no POW/MIA information of value. For example, JPAC investigators spent five nights in a luxury Paris hotel with “no report” of POW-related activity.

One especially disturbing report involves a JPAC team that visited a French building, ostensibly to investigate the reported remains of a World War I GI. The team found a toy skeleton and what appeared to be dog bones – but the search also revealed bottles of champagne. After this find, the team leader reported: “We finished the champagne, packed our case of bottles in the van, and we bid with adieu… I turned to the team and said, ‘That’s how it’s done ladies and gentlemen.’ The best case ever!”


<image020.png>

A JPAC Investigation:

Toy Skeleton, Probable Dog Bones and Champagne

 

 

The Cole Report asserted that not only was the trip a waste of time and money, but upon returning to base an official attempted to put through a carefully crafted report to justify a return trip. “This is a clear case of the (investigations unit) willfully withholding data as well as selectively excluding data from analysis, which are both examples of gross research misconduct. Withholding information concerning the rubber skeleton and the non-human osseous material (dog bones) was a deliberate attempt to create a serious distortion,” the Cole Report concluded. “There is no record of JPAC Command or senior management taking administrative action against those responsible for what in best international practice constitutes Core Research Misconduct.”

 

In another case, the report alleges, almost $100,000 was wasted sending historians to investigate the case of men “who were located, recovered, identified and removed from the roster of the missing 65 years ago.”

“Unreliable Results”

One element of the Cole Report raises even more disturbing issues. In a discussion of the Pentagon’s flawed POW/MIA lists, discussed earlier, the report analyzes a JPAC database called CARIS (Central Accounting Repository and Information System). The report features a chart called “CARIS: Unreliable Results.” By the names of some missing men, the chart indicates mistakes in the database location of remains, such as “Off by 8 Km (kilometers).”

The chart also shows that the “database of the missing” includes men who actually returned home alive. “(P)eople carried as KIA (in the JPAC CARIS database) in fact survived the Korean War,” it reveals.

Perhaps most importantly, it has the notation “Wrong body sent home?” by the names of three men reportedly returned in Operational Glory, the exchange of remains after the war. Next to those names are different identities under the column “Accurate data,” implying the remains returned home had been misidentified.
 

<image021.jpg>
 

We asked the Pentagon to explain this. JPAC would not respond. A DPMO official told us the “Name” column is the identity provided by the Communists during Operation Glory, while the “Accurate Data” is the identity determined by US military identification experts. “’(P)rovided names’ (from the Communists) were circulated for forensic purposes only, but are now widely mistaken for ‘names identified,’” he wrote. We were still puzzled as to why the comment in the Cole Report states “Wrong body sent home?” and is highlighted, since the report is based on recent information and written by an expert no doubt well aware of the difference between Communist-supplied names and actual identifications.

The Pentagon official also noted: “You also need to know that the Lab at Kokura (where bodies were identified by the US) had a wonderful mix of US and Japanese anthropologists, with widely varying academic and government backgrounds. Internal disagreement was common enough. Notes passed back and forth…  So a jabbing comment like, ‘Wrong body sent home?’ does not surprise me. My best belief, and I’d say the same to the families, is that it sorted out in good faith.”

Not mentioned by the Pentagon official is that the “wonderful mix” of people identifying Americans from the Korean War included an anthropologist later criticized by Congress and other investigators for sloppy work during the Vietnam War. An investigation revealed the man’s credentials had been inflated and raised allegations he and his co-workers, working for the predecessor of JPAC, had misidentified Vietnam War remains. In at least one case, an “identified” MIA from Vietnam had to be exhumed when his actual remains were later discovered.

In the best case, the CARIS chart in the Cole Report represents a data entry mistake now fixed, or an internal investigative discrepancy resolved and the original identifications verified. In the worst case, “wrong bodies” may have indeed been sent home. Either way, the situation is confused. We have not received clarification by publication time.

We can say with certainty the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) remains under the spotlight. As we write, it is undergoing the final phase of another investigation, this from the federal Government Accountability Office. JPAC’s commander in July 2013 predicted substantial changes might be in store for the Pentagon’s POW/MIA operations. Better late than never.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 26 July, 2018 10:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Holmes, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Robert K. Holmes, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on May 9, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1584968/
uss-oklahoma-marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-holmes-r/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Holmes was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Holmes.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Holmes' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Holmes' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XexBEAS

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 26 July, 2018 12:33
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For (Cornwell, O.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell, killed during World War II, has

now been accounted for.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1585209/
airman-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-cornwell-o/

 

On January 27, 1944, Cornwell was a member of the 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd

Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force, piloting a Supermarine Spitfire

aircraft, which was shot down over Pierrefeu-du-Var, France. Cornwell was

engaged in battle with a German Messerschmitt 109 (Me-109). Another pilot

also engaged in battle witnessed two unidentified aircraft crash into the

side of a mountain near Pierrefeu-du-Var. Cornwell could not be reached

through radio contact. Because southern France was occupied by enemy forces,

an immediate search could not be conducted. After Allied forces liberated

the area, they were unable to locate Cornwell's remains.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Steve Leleu and the French government for their

assistance in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Cornwell's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Impruneta, Italy, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 26 July, 2018 12:03
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Cummings, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. John B. Cummings, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

July 12.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1585097/
soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-cummings-j/

 

In December 1944, Cummings was a member of Company A, 276th Infantry

Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, along the France and Germany border to

reinforce the Alsace area. On Dec. 31, 1944, German troops crossed the Rhine

River into France. As darkness fell, two member of Cummings' company passed

him as he sat in a foxhole near the riverbank. Sometime later, U.S. troops

heard German machine gun fire and maneuvered their way back to Cummings'

foxhole. The troops were unable to find Cummings, but they did find a helmet

with a bullet hole. Despite extensive recovery efforts, Cummings' remains

were unable to be located.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Cummings' name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Epinal

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Dinoze,

France, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an

Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery, Cummings' grave was meticulously

cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Not being asked about in current US/DPRK talks…

 

http://www.kpows.com/confirmedalivetheashleyfive.html

 

 

Gilbert Ashley & Hidemaro Ishida

 

PS Pentagon POW/MIA still lists them as MIA, despite declassified military intel records showing they were confirmed POWs.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 25 July, 2018 13:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Mintus, W.)

 

Navy Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus, killed during World War

II, was accounted for on June 25, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1584159/sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mintus-w/

 

On July 27, 1944, Mintus was a radioman aboard a torpedo bomber from U.S.

Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51). Mintus' aircraft was the lead of

four Avengers on a mission targeting the Japanese base at Malakal Harbor.

The aircraft was last observed three to five miles ahead of the other

aircraft, at the beginning of the attack. Witnesses observed an object,

believed to be an aircraft, on fire in Malakal Harbor. All three servicemen

on board, including Mintus, were reported missing in action and subsequently

presumed dead on Feb. 4, 1946.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government of Palau and Bent Prop for their

partnership in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mintus' name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American

Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other

MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 July, 2018 07:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Pace, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1581179/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-pace-m/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pace was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Pace.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Pace's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Pace's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0YEAS

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 July, 2018 10:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Mills, A.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Albert E. Mills, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

on July 13.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1579003/

soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-mills-a/

 

In July 1950, Mills was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry

Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, blocking the Korean People's Army from

advancing along a corridor linking the cities of Taejon and Taegu. South

Korea. On July 23, 1950, enemy forces attacked American defenses at

Yongdong. Mills was reported missing in action on July 25, 1950, as a result

of the fighting, when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mills' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Mills' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000cdNpEAI

 
Leonard Chinn earned the Silver Star while fighting in World War II. The Silver Star is the “third-highest military combat decoration that can be awarded ...
 
The U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced in March that Rosenkrantz's body was recently recovered not far from where he died in ...
 
 
The U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced in February that Gibson's body had been finally accounted for thanks to advances in DNA ...

From: Marty Eddy <eddypowmia@aol.com>
Sent: Fri, Jul 20, 2018 5:47 pm
Subject:  National League of POW-MIA Families 49th annual meeting program and presentations link

The National League of POW/MIA Families (the League) has uploaded detailed information from the 49th annual meeting to the League website.  The multi-day meeting was one of the best and most encouraging in years.  If you follow the link below, it will take you to the League annual meeting page.

 

Scroll to "NATIONAL LEAGUE OF POW/MIA FAMILIES 49th ANNUAL MEETING" and look for the .pdf documents you can open and read online or save for later reading.  The documents include:  the 49th annual meeting program with letters from the president and the US ambassadors to Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia; remarks given by Richard Childress, the League senior policy advisor; a US-Russia Joint Commission presentation and a command briefing, both given by Kelly McKeague, director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA); 12 DPAA presentations covering various aspects of the accounting process; and a workshop covering off-the-scope aircraft losses.

 

I urge you to take advantage of access to this information.  Share the link with others.  As you know, the League concerns itself with those unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.  However, you will find reference to activities and processes concerning other wars in some of the DPAA presentations.  I recommend you read the program book, Mr. Childress's remarks, and Director McKeague's remarks -- in that order -- before you delve into the DPAA presentations and the workshop materials.

 

 

Never give up.

 

(Ms.) Marty Eddy

Michigan State Coordinator, National League of POW/MIA Families

Secretary/Treasurer, POW Committee of Michigan

3714 Pearl Ave.

Warren, MI  48091

Cell:  248-214-6398

Fax:  248-282-0906

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 20 July, 2018 11:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, accounted for on April 11,

will be buried July 30 in Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery, Fort

Leavenworth, Kansas.

 

Politte, 19, of Leavenworth, was killed during World War II.

 

His sister, Dorothy Culp, of Kansas city, Missouri, is available for

interviews at (816) 216-1558.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Politte on file.

 

The Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery is on a military base and all media

must be escorted onto the installation.

Media interested in covering the event, please contact George Marcec,

George.a.marcec.civ@mail.mil or 913-684-1718.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In the summer of 1943, Politte served as a gunner with the 345th Bombardment

Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force.  He was

killed while participating in a raid on the Ploesti Oil Refinery complex

north of Bucharest, Romania, during Operation Tidal Wave.  The goal of the

operation was to destroy the refineries in the area in order to hamper the

German war effort.  During the raid, Politte's B-24 Liberator aircraft was

hit by machine gun fire and crashed.  Following the war, his remains could

not be identified. 

 

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command

(AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. servicemen in Europe

as part of the global effort to identify and return fallen servicemen.

Remains that could not be identified were designated as unknowns and

interred in U.S. overseas cemeteries.  Beginning in 2010, DPAA and its

predecessors digitized and began to analyze more than 8,000 files for

Unknowns from WWII.

 

One set of unidentified remains, designated Unknown X-5056 Neuville, were

historically linked to an unaccounted-for American lost during the aerial

bombing raids against oil refineries at Ploesti, Romania.

 

In April 2016, following analysis by DPAA anthropologists of biological DNA

for X-5056 Neuville that suggested the remains could most likely be

identified, the Unknown was disinterred and transported to the DPAA

laboratory. 

 

To identify Politte's remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner

System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), analysis, dental, anthropological and

chest radiograph comparison analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

assistance in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted

for from World War II.  Politte's name is recorded on the Tablets of the

Missing at the Florence American Cemetery Impruenta, Italy, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII.

Although interred as an Unknown in Ardennes American Cemetery, Politte's

grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 19 July, 2018 10:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Mills, A.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Albert E. Mills, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

on July 13.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1579003/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-mills-a/

 

In July 1950, Mills was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry

Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, blocking the Korean People's Army from

advancing along a corridor linking the cities of Taejon and Taegu. South

Korea. On July 23, 1950, enemy forces attacked American defenses at

Yongdong. Mills was reported missing in action on July 25, 1950, as a result

of the fighting, when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Mills' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Mills' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000cdNpEAI


 
The commander of F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming has agreed to replace a Bible on a POW/MIA table with a generic “book of faith,” according ...

 

 
... have been 'already identified' by the DPRK (North Korea) to be repatriated,” says Paul Cole, who has researched POW-MIA issues from the Korean ...

 

 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA, has announced that Staff Sgt. Rosenkrantz's remains have been identified and that he will be ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) finally laid to rest Tech Sgt. John F. Brady, Tech Sgt. Allen A. Chandler, 1st Lt. John H. Liekhus, ...
 
Citing practical difficulties, the official said 55 was a “ballpark” figure and that it would require further testing by the Defence POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
According to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the United States conducted 33 joint field activities in North Korea between 1996 ...
 
... but when he rose from his position, "enemy gunfire erupted and Rosenkrantz was killed," according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 July, 2018 10:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Ramos-Rivera, F.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for on July 12.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1576571/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-ramos-rivera-f/

 

In July 1950, Ramos-Rivera was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th

Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against North Korean forces near Taegon, South Korea. As U.S. forces

regrouped after their evacuation, Ramos-Rivera could not be accounted-for

and was declared missing in action on July 20, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in

this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ramos-Rivera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the

Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Ramos-Rivera's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000DtbXREAZ

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 July, 2018 09:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Chinn, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, killed during the Korean War, was

accounted for on July 12.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1576456/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-chinn-l/

 

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent

Chinese attacks in North Korea. Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy

forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war

camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made

by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S.

service members in North Korea.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Chinn's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004lh3EAA

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 12:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Holliday, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday, killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on July 12, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1575652/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-holliday-d/

 

In November 1950, Holliday was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th

Cavalry Regiment, 7th Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

North Pyongan Province, North Korea. Holliday was killed in action on Nov.

30, 1950 and was reportedly buried in the United Nations Military Cemetery

(UNMC) Pyongyang. As the United Nations' situation with North Korea

worsened, circumstances forced UNMC Pyongyang on Dec. 3, 1950, and buried

remains could not be recovered.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Holliday's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Holliday's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004nSaEAI

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, accounted for on

February 12, will be buried July 21, in Inglewood, California.

 

Gibson, 20, of Winchester, Kansas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Thomas Clark, Jr., of Roseville, California, is available for

interviews at (916) 521-4305.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Gibson on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gibson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Gibson. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Gibson.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Gibson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA, as well as

anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Gibson's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Gibson's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XhCNEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:40
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Walter W. Green, accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will be buried

July 20 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Green, 18, of Zanesville, Ohio, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Green on file. 

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In November 1950, Green was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Unsan, North Korea.  Green was reported missing in action as of Nov. 2, 1950

when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

 

Following the war, during an operation known as "Operation Big Switch," when

prisoners of war were returned, returning Americans from Pyoktong Camp 5

reported that Green had been captured and died while at POW Camp 5.  Based

on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on June 30, 1951.

 

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover

American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after

the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North

Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September

and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were

returned. However, Green's remains were not included and he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

In September 1954, a set of remains received from North Korea and reportedly

recovered from the Pyoktong Cemetery were returned and designated Evacuation

(Evac) N-14413 by the Central Identification Laboratory (CIU-Kokura).

However, the remains could not be identified and were interred as Unknown

X-14413 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

In November 1998, the Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii

recommended the disinterment of 15 unknowns, including X-14413.  The remains

were disinterred on January 31, 2001 and sent to the laboratory for

analysis.

 

To identify Green's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, laboratory

analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison,

as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,699 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Green's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the NMCP, along with other MIAs from the Korean War.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 July, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, accounted for on March 7, will be buried

July 20 in Riverside, California.

 

Rosenkrantz, 28, of Los Angeles, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Phillip Rosenkrantz, of Placentia, California, is available for

interviews at (714) 401-2715.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Rosenkrantz on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In September 1944, Rosenkrantz was a member of Company H, 504th Parachute

Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, participating in Operation Market

Garden, a ploy by Allied planners to break German defensive lines on the

western front by capturing a highway route through the Netherlands.  On

Sept. 28, 1944, Rosenkrantz' platoon occupied Heuvelhof, a farm, located

south of the town of Groesbeek.  German tanks and infantry launched a major

attack that morning.  The isolated paratroopers hid among sparse trees and

buildings.  As Rosenkrantz rose from his position, enemy gunfire erupted and

Rosenkrantz was killed.  Due to enemy fire and the proximity to enemy

troops, Rosenkrantz' remains could not be recovered. 

 

Between 1945 and 1952, Canadian, Dutch and American Graves Registration

teams were active in the area where Rosenkrantz died.  The Dutch team

recovered identification tags for Rosenkrantz, along with fragmentary

remains.  An American team, acting on the information provided by the Dutch,

followed up and found additional fragmentary remains, but the combined

remains discovered were too sparse to be identified.  Unbeknownst to those

teams, a Canadian team working in the area prior to their arrival had

already collected the remains of service members killed in this area.  As a

result of all of these activities, several sets of unidentifiable remains

recovered from the battlefields around Groesbeek were buried as unknowns in

American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) cemeteries in Europe.

 

After thorough research and historical analysis by DPAA. Aided by Dutch

researcher Mr. Ben Overhand and 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment historian

Mr. Frank Van Lunteren, one set of interred remains, X-1234 Margraten, was

circumstantially associated to the location of where Rosenkrantz was killed.

 

The remains, which were initially recovered by the 2nd Canadian Graves

Registration Unit, were buried at the Canadian Military Cemetery on June 22,

1945, and were listed as an American Soldier.   

 

On June 14, 2017, DPAA disinterred X-1234 from the Netherlands American

Cemetery.

 

To identify Rosenkrantz' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his

records; and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Overhand, Mr. Van Lunteren, the Royal Netherlands

Army's Recovery and Identification Unit and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war. Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Rosenkrantz' name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII.  A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.       

 
In an interview with Reuters last week, an official with the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Washington never pays any foreign ...
 
 
No wonder the black POW/MIA flags still flutter. If silence is to still rule the day, then there is no means for truth to wend its way into our consciousness.
 
North Korea-US agree to excavate POW/MIA remains ... reinitiate the excavation of the remains of US POW/MIA that perished during the Korean War.
 
Some 5,300 are believed to be in North Korea, according to the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which tracks the remains of fallen ...
 
“It still will take us a number of years, assuming full access,” stated Kelly McKeague, Director of U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. “We've yet ...
 
To identify Green's remains, scientists from Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency accounted for Valley on Jan 11 through DNA, circumstantial evidence and dental and anthropological ...
 
Article 4 of the Trump-Kim agreement states that the U.S. and North Korea “commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate ...
 
That was when Solomon was identified by a scientist from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner system ...
 
South Korean military authorities also returned the remains of a US soldier unearthed in South Korea by way of the US Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
According to the website of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, North Korea has returned the remains of at least 3,200 Americans since the ...
 
“The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified,” the fourth ...
 

https://apnews.com/d70230c6c4164872b5c7cf3d801235bf/Shot-down-in-Germany,-veteran's-remains-returned-to-Idaho    07/13/18

MOSCOW, Idaho (AP) — Seventy-three years after his bomber was shot down over East Germany, Staff Sgt. Charles H. Daman has come home.

It was the spring of 1945 when 21-year-old Daman, a Plummer High School graduate, was killed in action after he and the crew of his B-24M Liberator were shot down over a field just north of Wittenberg, Germany....

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency “gives new meaning to no man left behind,” stated Patricia Farinacci, during a tribute to her uncle, Joseph ...

From: Cheryl Cerbone
Sent: 13 July, 2018 08:35
To:
Subject: Death of our National Commander

 

The Directors, Officers and members of the American Ex-Prisoners of War are saddened by the death of our National Commander Charles Susino, Jr. on Thursday, July 12, 2018 at his home in New Jersey.

As always, he was surrounded by his family and their love.

There will be a very simple one day service on Wednesday, July 18th,

2-6 pm at the Wright and Ford funeral home in Flemington, NJ.  At a later date, TBD, he will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Many of you know his love and passion for veterans, his fellow ex-Prisoners of War and his country.

 

If you wish to reach out to his family, please address cards to his son, Charles Anthony Susino, who will share them with his mother, Lillian, and his family.


Charles Anthony Susino

951 Gates Avenue

Piscataway, NJ  08854

charles.susino@gmail.com

 

We appreciate all the support we have received from the Veterans Service Officers through the years. Thank you.

 

 

 

 

Cheryl Cerbone, Editor

EX-POW Bulletin

23 Cove View Drive

South Yarmouth, MA  02664

 
She died before seeing the results, but in September of last year, Tanner received confirmation that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency had ...

From: Fowler, Michael G CIV DPAA EC (US)
Sent: 12 July, 2018 10:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Notes from DPAA Quarterly Family/VSO Update call

Dear Family Organizations, VSOs, and MSOs,

 We apologize for the delay in getting these notes out to you.   Please see
the attached.  They are also posted on our website at:
http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1570677/defense-
powmia-accounting-agency-dpaa-quarterly-familyvsomso-call-notes/

 
... Washington found many sets of remains, which were sent to the US Defense POW (Prisoners of War)/MIA (Missing in Action) Accounting Agency in ...
 
 
... Washington found many sets of remains, which were sent to the U.S. Defense POW (Prisoners of War)/MIA (Missing in Action) Accounting Agency in ...
 
Thanks to the efforts of the newly created Defense POW/MIA agency, Johnson's remains, which had been interred in a grave containing dozens of ...
 
With working-level talks scheduled between North Korea and the US on July 12 for the return of the remains of US POW/MIA from the Korean War, the ...
 
"We have yet to see any specifics from that commitment," said McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).
 
 
However, Kelly McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which tracks the remains of fallen American soldiers ...
According to the Washington Post, Chuck Prichard, a spokesman for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, said that the US has sent North Korea ...

“We have yet to see any specifics from that commitment,” said McKeague, director of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Fortier <
bfortier@usamedia.tv>
Sent: Tue, Jul 10, 2018 7:48 am
Subject: POW/MIA Director Visiting Northeast Asia to Meet with Allies and Partners - Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

 

 

POW/MIA Director Visiting Northeast Asia to Meet with Allies and Partners

By DPAA Public Affairs

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1569768/powmia-director-visiting-northeast-asia-to-meet-with-allies-and-partners/

 

WASHINGTON, July 9, 2018 —Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Director Kelly McKeague is travelling to
 Northeast Asia July 8-18, 2018 to acknowledge the longstanding cooperation of the governments and peoples of Japan,  the Republic of Korea, and the People’s Republic of China in the search for America’s unaccounted-for personnel from past conflicts dating back to World War II.


“Our progress accounting for Department of Defense (DoD) personnel still missing from past wars has been significant,  but it would not be possible without the staunch support and strong collaboration of our host nation partners,” said McKeague.

McKeague stressed that the continued cooperation from Japan, South Korea, and China has been essential in providing the fullest possible accounting for DoD’s missing personnel to their families and the nation. He also said the good will generated in jointly pursuing the Agency’s humanitarian efforts in Northeast Asia has contributed to the respective bilateral relationships in each country.

McKeague will also discuss the development of joint initiatives to help accelerate the Agency’s overall efforts in Northeast Asia.

“We welcome and appreciate assistance from our host nation partners in developing new methods and approaches to increase and improve efforts to account for our service members who made the ultimate sacrifice and provide long-sought answers to their families,”  he said.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country,   visit the DPAA website at 
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

 

 
(Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP). This circa 1940s photo provided Tuesday, July 3, 2018, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
Re
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency say Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. He was wounded on Nov.
... and protracted fight to seize Rhine River crossings into Nazi Germany, according to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA (DPAA) Accounting Agency.

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) said August 30, 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a Joint U.S./ North Korean recovery ...

 

 
Goodwin's remains had been recovered in North Korea in 1998 and were identified last year by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).

 

 
For decades, his family and the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency worked hard to find his remains. Finally, in December 2017 his remains were ..

 

 
Information from the Defense POW MIA Accounting Agency shows 14-hundred Minnesota service members from World War II are still unaccounted for.

 
... T. Ton, Defense Attache of the US Embassy in Hanoi, representatives of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the US MIA Office in Hanoi.

 

 
Three years ago, officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began examining remains at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific ...

 

 
WASHINGTON — The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, ...

 

 
In 2015, members of the defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis. To identify Johnson's ...
 
Information from the Defense POW MIA Accounting Agency shows 1,400 Minnesota service members from World War II are still unaccounted for.
 
His remains were held at an American cemetery in France until they were eventually sent to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for analysis on ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 12:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Elmore, J.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

July 3, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1568522/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-elmore-j/

 

In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

McDowell could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in

action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the British government and military authorities, as well

as the Korean government for their partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Elmore's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 12:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Jenkins, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Willard Jenkins, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

July 3, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1568524/
soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-jenkins-w/

 

In September 1944, Jenkins was a member of Company C, 307th Airborne

Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division near Nijmegen,

Netherlands. On Sept. 20, 1944, while participating in Operation Market

Garden, the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) was ordered to cross the

Waal River to make an amphibious attack on the bridges. Using borrowed

British assault boats, members of the PIR crowded into boats with members of

Jenkins' battalion. According to historical reports, Jenkins operated the

rudder of one of the boats, and was wounded in the chest by fire, before

falling overboard. Because the area downstream of the river was controlled

by enemy forces, a search could not be conducted. Jenkins was declared

missing in action on Sept. 20, 1944.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission and the

government of the Netherlands for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Jenkins' name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Margraten, Netherlands, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although

interred as an "unknown", his grave was meticulously cared for over the past

70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 08:46
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Michigan Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, accounted for on January 11, will

be buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His brother, Robert Valley, of Gladstone, Michigan, is available for

interviews at (906) 280-9538.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Valley on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Valley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Valley. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Valley.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Valley's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA, as well as circumstantial evidence and dental and

anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Valley's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, along with

the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 July, 2018 08:53
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class James C. Solomon, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017,

will be buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Solomon, 23, of Forestburg, Texas, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Harvey Seay, of Bowie, Texas, is available for interviews at

(940) 841-1420.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Solomon on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Solomon was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Solomon. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Solomon.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Solomon's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Solomon's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

Good Sunday Morning Veterans, Advocates, Patriots, Family and Friends of our Missing in Action and Former Prisoners of War!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgiohgqjB3Y

 

The National POW/MIA Recognition Day event, The RIDE HOME, is scheduled to kick off on September 20, 2018 and our base of operations this year will be Warner Robins Georgia. For over 15 years we have invited Former Prisoners of War and Families of those still Missing in Action so we may fulfill the Commander-in-Chief’s Proclamation:

 

“I call upon the people of the  United States to join me in honoring  and remembering all former American prisoners of war and those missing in action who valiantly served our great country.  I also call upon Federal, State, and local government officials and private organizations to observe this day  with appropriate ceremonies  and activities.”

 

Please check out the YOUTUBE link above, provided courtesy of Ann Wolf and then check out the event website - http://www.theridehome.com/home-1.html - on the main menu at the top of the page you will find the Hotels we have agreements with under Lodging - http://www.theridehome.com/lodging-2018.html - and you can see the proposed itinerary for the three day event here - http://www.theridehome.com/itinerary-2018.html -

 

Hero’s Banquet – Friday, 21 September requires a $25 donation per plate if you wish to break bread with our Honored Guest – information here - http://www.theridehome.com/banquet2018.html

All Services are open to the Public.

All escort Rides gathering points to the services will be announced on or about the 10th of September.

 

This is the Largest mutigenerational gathering of Former Prisoners of War and Families of Missing in Action in the country in response to the Presidential Proclamation, so come, be a part of History!

If you wish to Sponsor an Honored Guest, check out the attached Form.

 

Looking forward to see you in Georgia this September!

 

Until they all come home……….

 

moe

Chairman

The RIDE HOME, Inc.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 July, 2018 09:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, accounted for on March 5, will be

buried July 14 in his hometown.

 

Shank, 24, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Mark Miller, is available for interviews at (504) 387-1092.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Shank on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank was a pilot with the 338th Fighter Squadron, 55th

Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force, flying

his P-38 on a mission to Bremen, Germany.  Shank was killed after engaging

in fierce enemy action.

 

In June 1948, the American Graves Registration Command recovered partial

remains from a P-38 crash site at Osteressen, Germany, however they were

declared unidentifiable, designated as X-7466 and buried as an Unknown at

Ardennes American Cemetery, Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium.

 

On May 29, 2008, historians from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC,

a predecessor to DPAA) met with a local German researcher, Mr. Werner

Oeltjebruns, who said he could identify Shank's crash site.  The team

visited the crash site in Osteressen, where material evidence of a crash

site remained. 

 

In 2016, a DPAA recovery team conducted an excavation of the Osteressen

site, where they recovered possible osseous material.  Simultaneously, after

thorough historical research and analysis, DPAA disinterred X-7466 from

Neuville.

 

To identify Shank's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well

anthropological analysis and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Oeltjebruns and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their assistance with this disinterment and recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Shank's name is recorded on the Walls of

the Missing at the Cambridge American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments

Commission in the United Kingdom, along with the others missing from WWII. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
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The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Tuesday that Canty will be buried July 10 in Arlington National Ceremony with full military honors.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 3 July, 2018 10:34

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Connecticut Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, accounted for on Dec. 12, 2017, will be buried July 10, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Canty, 22, of Winstead, Connecticut, was killed during World War II.

 

His great nephew, Wayne Brazeau, Jr., is available for interviews at (773) 848-1702.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Canty on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On June 22, 1944, Canty was a member of the 555th Bombardment Squadron, 386th Bombardment Group, IX Bomber Command, aboard a B-26 Maurader on a nighttime bombing mission from Easton Lodge-Essex, England, against targets near Caen, France.  His B-26 was shot down between the villages of Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, France.  All eight crewmembers were killed in the incident.  Because the location of the crash was in German-held territory, U.S. forces were unable to make a detailed search for the crew at the time of their loss. 

 

Following the liberation of France, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who were killed in battle.  Residents of Gavrus recalled that a two-engine airplane crashed just outside the village on June 22, 1944.  An American was recovered and buried in a nearby British cemetery.  In 1945, the remains were exhumed and he was identified as an airman aboard the same aircraft as Canty.  However, no other remains were identified and Canty was declared non-recoverable.

 

In 1986, a French citizen located remains and personal effects recovered from a crash site near Gavrus.  The remains were handed to the Normandy American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, and were later identified as four individuals from the same aircraft as Canty.

 

In October 2014, Mr. Michael Jurd, a British researcher contacted U.S.

authorities that he found remains, as well as personal effects that corresponded to Canty, near Gavrus. 

 

In 2016, a DPAA investigation team surveyed the reported crash site and recommended it for excavation.

 

Between April and May 2017, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site between Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, locating possible remains and personal effects. 

 

To identify Canty's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French Government, Mr. Michael Jurd and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members (approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.  Canty's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Normandy American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 3 July, 2018 10:07
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Idaho Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Sgt. Charles H. Daman, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will

be buried July 11 in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

 

Daman, 21, of De Smet, Idaho, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Wilbur Tanner, of Moscow, Idaho, is available for interviews at

(208) 301-0007.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Daman on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe drew to a close, Allied forces

launched a series of aerial attacks to cripple what remained of the German

air force.  Daman, who was a member of the 714th Bombardment Squadron, 448th

Bombardment Group, 2nd Bombardment Division, was aboard an aircraft on an

attack mission on April 4, 1945, as one of more than 400 bombers to attack

airbases at Parchim, Perleberg and Wesendorf, Germany.  The aircraft, which

held 10 airmen, was attacked by enemy fighter planes in the vicinity of

Hamburg. 

 

Following the attack, the aircraft exploded and crashed, leaving only one

survivor, who was subsequently captured after he parachuted into the town of

Ludwigslust.  Personal effects of eight of the nine missing crewmembers were

found and identified by the surviving airman. 

 

On August 15, 1997, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA)

investigative team travelled to Ludwigslust to locate a possible crash site.

A local helped the team analyze a 1948 site sketch and align it with

present-day landmarks.  With this information, the team found aircraft

wreckage. 

 

In 2014 and 2015, multiple recovery teams excavated the site, finding

osseous material.  The remains were sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Daman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his

records, and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the German government and the staff of the Ludwigslust

Castle for their cooperation in this recovery mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Daman's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the other

MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
The Joint Recovery Team is made up of the Department of POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), East Carolina University Marine Archeology ...
 
 
"Recovery projects take many years to develop," said Lieutenant Dan Friedman, who led the project for the US Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency ...
 
This circa 1940s photo provided Tuesday, July 3, 2018, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency shows U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H.
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) has been helped by the French military divers to search the wrecks of downed fighter planes.

 
The Royal Canadian Air Force says the wing came from the 1956 crash of a Silver Star T-33 belonging to the 409 Squadron out of Cold Lake, Alta.
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, in 1998 a witness reported to a joint U.S./North Korean recovery team that human remains ...

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 12:31
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Elmore B. Goodwin, accounted for on Aug. 18, 2017, will

be buried July 9 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Goodwin, 25, of Norfolk, Virginia, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His nephew, Dr. Stefan C. Goodwin, of Baltimore, is available for interviews

at (410) 235-4985.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Goodwin on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Goodwin was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion,

24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

Anju, North Korea.  Goodwin was reported missing in action on Nov. 27, 1950.

When no information regarding Goodwin was reported by returning American

POWs, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

 

On August 30, 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a Joint U.S./ North

Korean recovery team interviewed a witness who claimed to have found human

remains in a cornfield in Kujang District.  On Sept. 6, 1998, the remains

were repatriated to the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory in

Hawaii.

 

To identify Goodwin's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made

by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S.

service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,699 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Goodwin's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
Seventy-five years later, Joe's nephew Dennis Rislove was in Green Bay, Wis., and officials from the POW/MIA Accounting Agency were explaining the ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 08:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris, accounted for on April 23, will be buried July

9 in Dallas.

 

Farris, 19, of Dodson, Texas, was killed during World War II.

 

His sister, Judith Bingham, of Fredericksburg, Texas, is available for

interviews at (432) 230-5263.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Farris on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1944, Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th

Infantry Division.  Farris’ unit arrived in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany on

Nov. 9, 1944 and immediately began preparing to advance eastward to the town

of Grosshau.  Despite continued progress, the regiment’s Soldiers sustained

heavy losses due to enemy artillery fire.  On Nov. 28, 1944, Farris was

wounded by artillery and left the front line for the battalion aid station.

His regiment remained in combat for several more days, reaching the

outskirts of Gey, Germany, before being pulled off the front line.  When

officers took an accounting of the surviving Company B soldiers, Farris

could not be found.  The last any of the survivors knew was that he had

tried to find an aid station.  He was listed missing in action when he could

not be located. 

 

Due to a lack of new information, Farris was declared deceased as of Nov.

29, 1945.

 

Between 1946 and 1950, dozens of unidentified remains were recovered from

the Hürtgen Forest by various graves registration units.  In May 1946,

members of the 6890th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company of the

American Graves Registration Command, recovered an unburied set of remains

in a minefield near Gey, Germany.  The remains were designated as X-2762

Neuville and interred at United States Military Cemetery

Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium- present day Ardennes American Cemetery.

X-2762 was disinterred on Nov. 17, 1948 for reprocessing.  When an

identification could not be made, they were interred at Epinal American

Cemetery in France.  Because no remains had been associated with Farris, he

was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 8, 1950.

 

Following thorough scientific and historical analysis by DPAA historians,

X-2762 Neuville was disinterred from the Epinal American Cemetery on July

27, 2017 and sent to DPAA for analysis.

 

To identify Farris’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome

(Y-STR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological, and dental analysis, and

material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.
 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Farris’ name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten,

Netherlands, an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the

other MIAs from WWII.  Although interred as an "unknown" his grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle

Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 July, 2018 09:45
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Brown, D.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. Donald E. Brown, killed during World War II, killed during World

War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1565038/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-brown-d/

 

In July 1944, Brown was a member of Company A, 745th Tank Battalion,

fighting in support of the 1st Infantry Division in the European Theater, in

World War II.  Brown was killed in action on July 28, 1944, when his M-4

Sherman tank was destroyed by enemy fire near Cambernon, France. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

assistance in this recovery.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Brown's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Brittany

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Saint

James, France, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as

an Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery, Brown's grave was meticulously

cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Mark Sauter <markasauter@gmail.com>
Sent: 1 July, 2018 20:12
To: Mark <markasauter@gmail.com>
Subject: Pls share: Best major media report ever on LKA US POWs & DPRK (Gordon Chang on Fox News)

 

 

http://video.foxnews.com/v/5804095133001/

 

Gordon is owed a great thanks for his forceful attention to this topic. I hope POTUS sees it, especially the color video of USAF Major Sam Logan in North Korean hands – they have never returned or accounted for him, along with so many others.

 

My only addition to Gordon’s great interview: At the end of the war, General Mark Clark, top commander of US/UN forces, did indeed publicly say the communists had kept US POWs. What was kept classified for decades was that a year AFTER the war, America’s top Air Force general asked the CIA to rescue American POWs still in enemy hands. See below.

 


Mark Sauter 202-701-9515

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 June, 2018 12:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, accounted for on January 30, will be

buried July 7, in Osage, Iowa.

 

Arickx, 22, of Mitchell, Iowa, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His family, Joan Lonergan, is available for interviews at 507-440-1856.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Arickx on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Arickx was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Arickx. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Arickx.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Arickx's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Arickx's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Arickx's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeK3EAK

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 June, 2018 12:03
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Camery, R)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery, killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 28, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1563838/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-camery-r/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Camery was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Camery.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Camery's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Camery's personnel profile can be viewed at