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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Recently Accounted-For...     DPAA

http://www.dpaa.mil/OurMissing/RecentlyAccountedFor.aspx

Note: Name may be noted above long before a Press Release is issued here:

http://www.dpaa.mil/NewsStories/Releases.aspx

 

Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

2016
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05/20/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Marine Pfc. Elmer L. Mathies, Jr., 21, of Hereford, Texas, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.  He will be buried May 28 in his hometown.

In November 1943, Mathies was assigned to Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Mathies died sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

His sister, Mary Hopson, of Plano, Texas, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her, at (505) 239-6944.
Additionally, his niece, Denise Cable, is also available for interviews, at (469) 233-6693.
 
The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Mathies on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAF
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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05/20/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Pvt. John P. Sersha, 20, of Leoneth, Minnesota, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.  He will be buried May 28 in Eveleth, Minnesota.

On Sept. 27, 1944, Sersha was assigned to Company F, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, as part of Operation Market Garden, and was entrenched on a hill overlooking the German-controlled Kiekberg Woods near Groesbeek, Netherlands. Sersha was one of three "Bazooka Men" who were sent out with a platoon from Company F to assault the German positions.  None of the three men returned from the battle and several Company F soldiers stated Sersha had been killed.

His nephew, Richard Lohry, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (218) 666-2685, or at ralohry@wildblue.net.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Sersha on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAF
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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05/20/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Pvt. Earl J. Keating, 28, of New Orleans, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains. He will be buried May 28 in his hometown.

Group remains representing Keating and Army Pvt. John H. Klopp, 25, also of New Orleans, were buried in Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C. on March 23. Klopp was also buried in Arlington National Cemetery on March 23.

In December 1942, Keating and Klopp were assigned to the Anti-Tank Company, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division, when their unit was involved in an intense engagement with enemy forces along the Soputa-Sanananda Track, which is present-day Papua New Guinea. On Dec. 5, 1942, American forces manned a roadblock position and repulsed a heavy Japanese attack, but sustained heavy casualties. Keating and Klopp died during the fighting and were buried by their fellow soldiers within the American perimeter. The American Graves Registration Service team was unable to locate Keating's and Klopp's remains after the war.

Keating's nephew, Michael Keating, Jr., of Lafayette, Louisiana, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (337) 230-4575.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Keating on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAF
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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05/20/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Navy Motor Machinist's Mate 1st Class John E. Anderson, 24, of Willmar, Minnesota, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.  He will be buried May 28 in his hometown.

On June 6, 1944, Anderson was in Landing Craft Tank (LCT), Mark 5, Hull Number 30, which landed on Omaha Beach, France during the invasion of Normandy.  Upon landing, men and equipment left the tank, while Anderson went to the engine room to check the sand traps.  The tank was subsequently destroyed by either enemy fire or an enemy mine.  Anderson was killed in the attack. 

His nephew, Don Franklin, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (412) 422-7909.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Anderson on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAF
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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Dear Editor,

The family of Navy Seaman 2nd Class Dale F. Pearce, 21, of Dennis, Kansas, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.  He will be buried May 26 in his hometown.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pearce was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in 429 casualties, including Pearce.
 
A family member, Ralph Pearce, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (620) 421-6278.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Pearce on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAF
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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Bryan-College Station Eagle

The remains of a Madisonville man who died in captivity during the Korean War and wasn’t returned to the U.S. for 40 years will finally be laid to rest near his home this afternoon.   Sgt. Billy Joe Williams became a prisoner of war in North Korea on Valentine’s Day in 1951. He died while he was a prisoner, but his remains weren’t returned to the United States until 1993 — commingled with the remains of hundreds of servicemen in 208 boxes shipped back between 1990 and 1994...

 
 
Wide Open Country
Sgt. Williams was an American soldier classified as a POW/MIA (prisoner of war/missing in action) during the Korean War in 1951. A member of the ...

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Dear Editor,

The family of Navy Chief Storekeeper Herbert J. Hoard, 36, of DeSoto, Missouri, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried May 21 in his hometown.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hoard was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma suffered multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in 429 casualties, including Hoard.
 
His nephew, Elbert Hoard, of Fayette, Missouri, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (660) 248-3253, or (573) 808-0445.
Additionally, his grandnephew, Robert Hoard, of Huntsville, Alabama, is available for interviews, at (256) 498-2244.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hoard on file.

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Dear Editor,

The family of Navy Chief Petty Officer Albert E. Hayden, 44, of Mechanicsville, Maryland, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried May 18 in Morganza, Maryland.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hayden was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma suffered multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in 429 casualties, including Hayden.
 
His cousin, Ronnie Kissinger, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her, at (410) 586-3070 or at romanee@comcast.net.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hayden on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Williams)

16-023 | May 10, 201
 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. Billy J. Williams, 20, of Madisonville, Texas, will be buried May 17 in Madison County, Texas. On Feb. 14, 1951, Williams was assigned to 2nd Reconnaissance Company, 2nd Infantry Division, when his company was attacked by the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces in the vicinity of Chuam-ni, North Korea. He was declared missing in action after the battle.

In 1953, during a prisoner of war exchange historically known as “Operation Big Switch,” a repatriated American service member stated that Williams died in April 1951, while in custody at a prisoner of war camp in Suan, North Korea. A military review board amended his status to deceased in 1953.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea between 1996 and 2005, included the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from an associated with the Suan Bean POW Camp, where Williams was reported to have died.

To identify Williams’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence; DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA, which matched a maternal aunt and cousin; as well as dental and chest radiograph comparisons, which matched Williams’ records.

Today, 7,819 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Sgt. Billy J. Williams, 20, of Madisonville, Texas, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried May 17 in Madison County, Texas.

On Feb. 14, 1951, Williams was assigned to 2nd Reconnaissance Company, 2nd Infantry Division, when his company was attacked by the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces in the vicinity of Chuam-ni, North Korea.
He was declared missing in action after the battle. In 1953, during a prisoner of war exchange historically known as "Operation Big Switch," a repatriated American service member stated that Williams died in April 1951, while in custody at a prisoner of war camp in Suan, North Korea. A military review board amended his status to deceased in 1953.

Sgt. Williams' niece, Nancy Motal, of Rosenberg, Texas, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (281) 232-2768.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Williams on file.


HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Ensign William M. Finnegan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/9/2016
Ensign John C. England U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/6/2016
Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/5/2016
Fireman 3rd Class Edwin C. Hopkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2016
Sgt. 1st Class James P. Shunney U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 5/3/2016
IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. NR-163-16
May. 4, 2016
Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman missing from the Korean War have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.
 
Army Cpl. David J. Wishon Jr. of Baltimore will be buried May 6 in Arlington National Cemetery.  On Dec. 1, 1950, Wishon, assigned to Medical Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was declared missing in action after his unit was heavily attacked by enemy forces in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Due to a prolonged lack of information regarding his status, a military review board amended his status to deceased in 1953.
 
Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, included the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Wishon was believed to have died.
 
Additionally, in October 2000, a joint U.S./North Korea recovery team recovered human remains from an alleged burial site in Kujang, North Korea.
 
To identify Wishon's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, consisting of two forms of DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat DNA, which matched his sisters.
 
Today, 7,819 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.
 
For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving the United States, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call 703-699-1420.

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Cpl. David J. Wishon, Jr., 18, of Baltimore, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried May 6 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington D.C.

On Dec. 1, 1950, Wishon, assigned to Medical Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was declared missing in action after his unit was heavily attacked by enemy forces in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Due to a prolonged lack of information regarding his status, a military review board amended his status to deceased in 1953.

His sister, Celia Gray, of Essex, Maryland, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (410) 686-8112.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Wishon on file.


HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said in a news release that 18-year-old Cpl. David J. Wishon of Baltimore will be buried with full military ...

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Aril 27, 2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Leonard R. Farron, 23, of Tacoma, Washington, unaccounted for since World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried May 4 in his hometown.

On Oct. 15, 1942, Farron was the pilot of a P-39 aircraft with the 67th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, 13th Air Force, when he failed to return from a strafing mission over Tassafaronga, Guadalcanal. His squadron mates reported they last saw Farron 10 minutes before landing, but there was heavy anti-aircraft fire and enemy fighters swarming the area at the time. No one reported seeing Farron crash.

A family member, Cindy LeCompte, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (813) 841-9091.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Farron on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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1st Lt. Leonard Farron returned home nearly 75 years after his death

 WWII pilot, a Puyallup tribal member shot down in 1942, finally comes home

    

The telephone call came late last year, and stunned 84-year-old Constance Earl Smith.
It was from someone saying they'd found the remains of her cousin, Leonard Farron – a 27-year-old member of the Puyallup Tribe and a World War II pilot missing since 1942.
“I heard her say, 'Whoa! Are you serious?'” daughter Cindy LeCompte said. “Then she listened for a minute and said, 'Of course!'”
That call was from a representative of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, charged with finding the bodies or remains of missing war victims. What they asked Smith was whether, as Farron's closest cousin, she would submit to a DNA test.
Smith did, and last week 1st Lt. Farron was brought home, 75 years after he enlisted in the Army Air Corps...

http://www.fox9.com/news/132515945-story


Minnesota sailor, killed during D-Day, identified after 72 years


04/25/2016
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Ensign Lewis B. Pride U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/28/2016
Lt. Julian B. Jordan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/27/2016
Seaman 2nd Class Rudolph V. Piskuran U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2016
Fireman 3rd Class Kenneth L. Jayne U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/14/2016
Cpl. George G. Simmons U.S. Army Battery H, 60th Coast Artillery Regiment 11/19/1942 Philippines 4/14/2016
Pvt. John P. Sersha U.S. Army Company F, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment 9/27/1944 Netherlands 4/13/2016
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Alfred F. Wells US Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/7/2016
Pfc. Anthony Brozyna U.S. Marine Corps Company G, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/6/2016
Ensign Joseph P. Hittorff U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/6/2016
Fire Controlman 1st Class Paul A. Nash U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/5/2016
Chief Storekeeper Herbert J. Hoard U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/4/2016
Pfc. John F. Prince U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 4/2/2016
Seaman 1st Class William E. Welch U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/1/2016
 
 
KGO-TV
George flew to Hawaii, where his uncle's remains were identified by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, and escorted them home. He blinked ...
 

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Air Forces Capt. Arthur E. Halfpapp, 23, of Steelton, Pennsylvania, unaccounted for since World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried April 14 in Annville, Pennsylvania.

On April 24, 1945, Halfpapp was assigned to the 87th Fighter Squadron, 79th Fighter Group, and was the pilot of a P-47 aircraft that crashed during an armed reconnaissance mission southeast of Alberone, Italy. After the crash, the mission flight leader circled the burning wreckage, and did not see any signs of life. Following the war, the Army Graves Registration Service searched for Halfpapp's crash site; however, his remains were not located.

His nephew, Jack Sipe, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at (717) 944-5664.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Halfpapp on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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Dear Editor,

The family of Army Cpl. Dennis D. Buckley, 24, of Detroit, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried April 14 in Rittman, Ohio.

On Feb. 5, 1951, Buckley was assigned to A Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, which was supporting the South Korean Army attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. The CPVF launched a counterattack, overwhelming neighboring units and leaving the 15th Field Artillery Battalion behind enemy lines. As the unit conducted a fighting withdrawal south toward Wonju, Buckley went missing near Hoengsong and was reported missing on February 13.

His niece, Eleanor Stevenson, of Youngstown, Ohio, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (330) 727-8339.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Buckley on file.


HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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When Eleanor Stevenson of Youngstown, Buckley's niece, received notice from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) that her uncle's ...

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Pfc. Aubrey D. Vaughn, 20, of Union, South Carolina, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried April 12 in his hometown.

On April 23, 1951, Vaughn was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 5th Regimental Combat Team, when his company's position was overrun by the Chinese Communist Forces near Undamjang, North Korea. After the battle, Vaughn was reported missing in action.

His daughter, Mrs. Myra Heatherly, of Jonesville, South Carolina, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (864) 674-1586.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Vaughn on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

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April 5, 2016

 

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

 

Army Pfc. Aubrey D. Vaughn, 20, of Union, South Carolina, will be buried April 12 in his hometown. On April 23, 1951, Vaughn was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 5th Regimental Combat Team, when his company’s position was overrun by the Chinese Communist Forces near Undamjang, North Korea. After the battle, Vaughn was reported missing in action.

 

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Vaughn died while in captivity at POW Camp 1 in 1951. The U.S. Army subsequently declared Vaughn deceased on July 7, 1951.

 

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called “Operation Glory.” All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army’s Central Identification Unit for analysis. The remains they were unable to identify were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the “Punchbowl.”

 

In 1999, due to advances in technology, the Department of Defense began to re-examine records and concluded that the possibility for identification of some of these unknowns now existed. The remains designated X-14176 were exhumed on May 18, 2015 so further analysis could be conducted.

 

In the identification of Vaughn’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, circumstantial evidence, as well as dental and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched Vaughn’s records.

 

Today, 7,819 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered by American recovery teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

 

 
 
Holly Slaughter, a spokeswoman with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, said in a phone interview. The remains that couldn't be identified ...

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April 4, 2016

 

Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

 

Army Air Forces Flight Officer Dewey L. Gossett, 23, of Spartanburg, South Carolina, will be buried April 11 in Wellford, South Carolina. On Sept. 27, 1943, Gossett was assigned to the 527th Fighter Squadron, 86th Fighter Group, 12th Air Force, and was the pilot of a single-seat A-36A “Apache” aircraft, in a flight of four aircraft searching for targets of opportunity on a strafing mission. Within 10 minutes of departing Sele Airfield in Italy, the aircraft encountered bad weather and poor visibility, leading them to fly into a ravine under cloud cover. Upon exiting the ravine, three planes turned left, while Gossett’s turned right and disappeared near Acerno, Italy. There was no enemy activity in the area and a search failed to identify a crash site. Following the loss incident, and with no further information on the whereabouts of Gossett, he was declared dead on Sept. 28, 1944.

 

The American Graves Registration Service, charged with the recovery and identification of fallen U.S. service members, conducted a search and investigation near Acerno in March, 1945. The investigation revealed that a plane had crashed and the pilot was buried in the Civil Cemetery in Acerno. The remains were disinterred, but were later found to be part of a B-17 loss in the same area. The AGRS declared Gossett non-recoverable on May 29, 1948.

 

            In June 2012, U.S. investigators contacted a private group of Italian historians and enthusiasts, Association Salerno 1943, who discovered the crash of an A-36 type aircraft in the mountains near Acerno, Italy. In November 2014, Association Salerno 1943 again visited the crash site and found human remains, which were returned to the custody of U.S. personnel.

DPAA is grateful to Association Salerno 1943 for their vital help in this recovery mission.

 

To identify Gossett’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched two nieces and a great niece, circumstantial evidence, and dental analysis, which matched Gossett’s records.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

-end-

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Dear Editor,

The family of Army Air Forces Flight Officer Dewey L. Gossett, 23, of Spartanburg, South Carolina, unaccounted for since World War II, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried April 11 in Wellford, South Carolina.

On Sept. 27, 1943 Gossett was assigned to the 527th Fighter Squadron, 86th Fighter Group, 12th Air Force, and was the pilot of a single-seat A-36A "Apache" aircraft, in a flight of four aircraft searching for targets of opportunity on a strafing mission. Within 10 minutes of departing Sele Airfield in Italy, the aircraft encountered bad weather and poor visibility, leading them to fly into a ravine under cloud cover. Upon exiting the ravine, three planes turned left, while Gossett's turned right and disappeared near Acerno, Italy. There was no enemy activity in the area and a search failed to identify a crash site. Following the loss incident, and with no further information on the whereabouts of Gossett, he was declared dead on Sept. 28, 1944.

His grandniece, Nora Messick, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (864) 316-2777, or via email at nora.messick@gmail.com.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Gossett on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

 

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Cpl. Robert P. Graham, 20, of San Francisco, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried Dec. 12 in Colma, California.

In February 1951, Graham was assigned to Company A, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, which was engaged in a battle near Hoengsong, South Korea. Under heavy enemy attack, his unit was ordered to withdraw south to Wonju. During the withdrawal, they fought continuously with the enemy and encountered numerous roadblocks. Upon arrival at Wonju, Graham was reported missing on Feb. 13, 1951.

His nephew, James George, of Fairfield, California, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at (707) 864-8059 or (707) 290-7156.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Graham on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/A-long-belated-homecoming-for-SF-soldier-who-died-7232854.php?cmpid=email-desktop

Army Cpl. Robert Graham disappeared after Chinese forces attacked his combat battalion in South Korea on a freezing day in February 1951. His family in San Francisco never saw him again.

On Wednesday night, he came home....

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Dear Editor,

The family of Army Pfc. Roy A. Henderson, 18, of Newark, Ohio, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release (attached) on the identification of his remains.

He will be buried April 8 in Follansbee, West Virginia.

On July 27, 1950, Henderson was assigned to Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, when his unit set up a defensive position near Anui, South Korea, in an attempt to stop invading North Korean forces. The troops were forced to withdraw south, and found the road blocked. This required Henderson's company to abandon most of its equipment and withdraw over mountains to friendly lines. Following the withdrawal, Henderson was reported missing. He was subsequently declared deceased on Dec. 31, 1953.

His niece, Judy Foresha, of Follansbee, West Virginia, is available for interviews if you would like to contact her at (304) 527-1969.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Henderson on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

 
 
WEAU

HONOLULU — The U.S. military says a recently identified sailor killed in the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor will be buried in his Wisconsin hometown next week.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Friday Chief Petty Officer Duff Gordon was 52 years old and assigned to the USS Oklahoma when he died.

He's scheduled to be buried in Hudson, Wisconsin, on Wednesday....

03/25/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Navy Chief Petty Officer Duff Gordon, 52, of Hudson, Wisconsin, unaccounted for from World War II, asked us to send you today's news release on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried March 30 in his hometown.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gordon was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma suffered multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in 429 casualties, including Gordon.
 
His grandnephew, David Jenson, of Waukesah, Wisconsin, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him, at (262) 547-2481.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Gordon on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Fireman 3rd Class John H. Lindsley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/25/2016
Cpl. Dennis D. Buckley U.S. Army A Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 South Korea 3/21/2016

earlier identifications below...

03/23/2016
 
 
Roanoke Times
They were then put in contact with the Department of Defense's POW/MIA Accounting Agency. And on Feb. 3, the family was notified that McMillian's ...
 
 
The News Tribune
The gathering is sponsored by the Defense Department POW/MIA ... It could have led to burial sites for prisoners of war and eventually to the ...
 
 
Stars and Stripes
Pfc. James M. Smith, of Abbeville, Ga., was buried Wednesday with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery, a Defense POW/MIA ...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Pentagon agency that searches for missing service members from the Himalaya Mountains to the jungles of Papua New Guinea is mounting a recovery this summer for a naval aviator who has been missing in the group's backyard since World War II.

Between Aug. 8 and Sept. 30, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency plans to seek the remains on Oahu of Ensign Harold P. DeMoss, whose F6F-3 Hellcat went down during a night training mission on June 23, 1945, in the Koolau Mountains...

03/18/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Cpl. Davey H. Bart, 18, of Houston, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried March 26 in Humble, Texas.

In early November 1950, Bart was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, near Unsan, North Korea, when Chinese People's Volunteer Forces attacked the regiment, forcing the unit to withdraw. Many soldiers attempted to escape and evade the enemy but were captured and marched to prisoner of war camps. Bart was declared missing in action as a result of the battle that occurred between Nov. 1 and 2, 1950.

Bart's family does not wish to be contacted by the media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Bart on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

03/18/2016

Dear Editor,

The family of Army Sgt. 1st Class Raymond K. McMillian, 20, of Axton, Virginia, missing from the Korean War, asked us to send you today's news release on the identification of his remains.
He will be buried March 26 in Martinsville, Virginia.

On Feb. 5, 1951, McMillian was assigned to Medical Company, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, which was supporting the South Korean Army attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. The CPVF launched a counterattack, overrunning neighboring units, which left the 38th Infantry Regiment behind enemy lines. As the unit conducted a fighting withdrawal south to Wonju, McMillian went missing near Hoengsong while assisting the wounded and was reported missing in action on Feb. 12, 1951.

His niece, Nancy Strickland, of Glade Hill, Virginia, is available for interviews is you would like to contact her at (540) 483-5665.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of McMillian on file.

HOLLY N. SLAUGHTER, Lt. Col., USAFR
Public Affairs
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

1st Lt. Frederick W. Langhorst U.S. Army Air Forces 1330 Army Air Force Base Unit, Air Transport Command 7/17/1945 India 3/17/2016
Sgt. 1st Class Alan L. Boyer U.S. Army Command and Control Detachment, 5th Special Forces Group 3/28/1968 Laos 3/16/2016
Sgt. 1st Class Raymond K. McMillian U.S. Army Medical Company, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 2/26/2016
Flight Officer Dewey L. Gossett Army Air Forces 527th Fighter Squadron, 86th Fighter Group, 12th Air Force 9/27/1943 Italy 2/25/2016
Cpl. Davey H. Bart U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 2/24/2016
Sgt. John C. Holladay U.S. Marine Corps Company B, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, 1st Marine Raider Regiment 7/20/1943 Soloman Islands 2/24/2016
Pfc. Aubrey D. Vaughn U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 5th Regimental Combat Team 4/23/1951 North Korea 2/24/2016
03/07/2016 11:56 AM CST
IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. NR-075-16
March 7, 2016
Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

 
The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. James M. Smith of Abbeville, Georgia, will be buried March 9 in Arlington National Cemetery.  In February 1951, Smith was assigned to Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, and was supporting the South Korean Army in attacks against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF). On Feb. 12, the CPVF counterattacked and forced the South Korean Army units to retreat, leaving American forces to fight alone. After the battle, Smith was reported missing in action. In April and May of 1953, the U.S. Army Quartermaster Graves Registration Companies conducted searches of the battlefields associated with Smith's unit, but no remains associated with him were located.

In 1953, during prisoner of war exchanges known as "Operation Little Switch" and "Operation Big Switch," no repatriated American service members were able to provide any information regarding Smith's whereabouts. A military review board amended his status to deceased in 1953.
 
Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where men captured from Smith's unit were believed to have died.

To identify Smith's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence; two types of DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a brother and a cousin, and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat DNA analysis, which matched a brother; and dental analysis, which matched Smith's records.

Today, 7,823 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Cpl. Eldon W. Ervin U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/9/2016
Cpl. Dudley L. Evans U.S. Army Company G, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/15/1951 South Korea 1/29/2016
Pfc. Roy A Henderson U.S Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 7/27/1950 North Korea 1/14/2016
Cpl. Kenneth R. Stuck U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 1/8/2016
 
 
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) march alongside a disinterred casket holding the remains of unknown USS Oklahoma ...
http://www.stripes.com/news/us/after-75-years-remains-of-5-uss-oklahoma-sailors-are-identified-1.388226

Oklahoma sailors are identified

By Michael E. Ruane

The Washington Post

Published: January 11, 2016
 

WASHINGTON — Almost 75 years after they were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor, the remains of five U.S. sailors who perished when their battleship was sunk, have been identified, the Pentagon said Monday.

The five men, who were exhumed last year from their graves in Hawaii and examined in special military laboratories, were among 429 sailors and Marines killed when the USS Oklahoma was torpedoed and capsized.

They had been buried as "unknowns."

The battleship's loss of life at Pearl Harbor was second only to the 1,100 lost on the USS Arizona, whose wreck remains a hallowed Pearl Harbor historic site.

The men identified were Chief Petty Officer Albert E. Hayden, 44, of Mechanicsville, Md., in St. Mary's County; Ensign Lewis. S Stockdale, 27, of Anaconda, Mont.; Seaman 2nd Class Dale F. Pearce, 21, of Labette County, Kan.; Petty Officer 1st Class Vernon T. Luke, 43, of Green Bay, Wisc.; and Chief Petty Officer Duff Gordon, 52, of Hudson, Wisc....

 
 
Stars and Stripes
Pfc. David S. Burke, 18, of Akron, Ohio, will be laid to rest Friday in Rittman, Ohio, according to a statement by the Department of Defense POW/MIA ...

1st Lt. Leonard R. Farron, lost during World War II, has now been accounted for.

1st Lt. Farron, a member of the 67th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, 13th Air Force, was flying a P-39D when he failed to return from a strafing mission over
Tassafaronga, Guadalcanal, on October 15th, 1942.

His squadron mates reported he was last sighted ten minutes prior to landing while flying through heavy anti-aircraft fire. In July 2013, an aircraft crash site was located
 in the area consistent with the circumstances of 1st Lt. Farron’s loss. In early 2015, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site and recovered aircraft wreckage,
life support equipment, and human remains. Circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis established the remains as those of 1st Lt Leonard R. Farron.

Interment services at the Puyallup Tribal Cemetery, Tacoma, WA are currently being planned for the spring/summer of 2016.

Welcome home and rest in peace 1st Lt. Farron.

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