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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

2013

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  • Cpl. Edwin L. Galarneau, Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. He was accounted for on Dec. 17, 2012.
  • Pfc. Roosevelt Clark, Company E, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, near the North Korean town of Unsan. He was accounted for on Dec. 13, 2012.
  • Sgt. Erving A. Fricke, U.S. Army, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, in Kujang, North Korea, along the Ch'ongch'on River. He was accounted for on Dec. 13, 2012.
  • Pfc. Glenn S. Schoenmann, U.S. Army, Company M, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost on Dec. 12, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Dec. 12, 2012.
  • Cpl. William C. Knight, U.S. Army, Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 6, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. He was accounted for on Nov. 30, 2012.
  • Sgt. Raymond B. Wellbrock, U.S. Army, Company M, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost on Dec. 12, 1950, near Sinhung-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on Nov. 30, 2012.
  • Pfc. Ernest V. Fuqua Jr., U.S. Army, E Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, near Kujang, North Korea. He was accounted for on Nov. 28, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Harold M. Brown, U.S. Army, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost on Dec. 12, 1950, near Sinhung-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on Nov. 26, 2012.
  • Sgt. Bobby R. King, U.S. Army, Battery A, 90th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Aug. 12, 1950, near Pongam-ni, South Korea. He was accounted for on Nov. 7, 2012.
  • Pvt. William Yawney, U.S. Army, D Company, 1st Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, was lost on July 7, 1944, on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands. He was accounted for on Oct. 29, 2012.
  • Sgt. Willard F. Williams, U.S. Army, E Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, just south of Unsan, North Korea. He was accounted for on Oct. 23, 2012.
  • Sgt. Stanley W. Bear, U.S. Army, F Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, was lost on Sept. 4, 1950, near Haman, South Korea. He was accounted for on Oct. 15, 2012.
  • Cpl. Elmer C. Kidd, U.S. Army, Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 30, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Oct. 11. 2012.
  • Lt. Col. Don C. Faith Jr., U.S. Army, commander of the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Oct. 11, 2012.
  • Cpl. Joseph W. Fontenot,U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost in February 1951 near Saemal, South Korea. He was accounted for on Oct. 10, 2012.
  • Pfc. James C. Mullins, U.S. Army, H Company, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, was lost on July 22, 1950, near Yugong-ni, South Korea. He was accounted for on Sept. 27, 2012.
  • Pfc. Arthur W. Hopfensperger, U.S. Army, Company B, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Sept. 12, 2012.
  • Col. Wendell R. Keller and Capt. Virgil K. Meroney III, U.S. Air Force, were lost on March 1, 1969, when their F-4D Phantom II aircraft was shot down in Khammouan Province, Laos. They were accounted for on Sept. 6, 2012, and April 11, 2012.
  • Capt. James M. Johnstone, U.S. Army, was lost on Nov. 19, 1966, when his OV-1A Mohawk aircraft crashed in Attapu Province, Laos. He was accounted for on Sept. 6, 2012.
  • Maj. James. L. Whited, U.S. Army, was lost on Nov. 19, 1966, when his OV-1A Mohawk aircraft crashed in Attapu Province, Laos. He was accounted for on Sept. 5, 2012.
  • Pvt. 1st Class James J. Jacques, U.S. Marine Corps, was lost on May 15, 1975, near Koh Tang Island, Cambodia. He was accounted for on Sept. 1, 2012.
  • Airman 1st Class Jerry M. Wall, U.S. Air Force, was lost on May 18, 1966, when the C-123B Provider aircraft that he was aboard crashed in Binh Dinh Province, Vietnam. He was accounted for on Aug. 30, 2012.
  • Sgt. Chester L. Williams, U.S. Army, B Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 6, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Aug. 28, 2012.
  • Cpl. Luther J. James, U.S. Army, Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 6, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Aug. 18, 2012.
  • Capt. Turnace H. Brown, U.S. Army, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 6, 1950 near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on Aug. 17, 2012.
  • Sgt. John R. Jones, U.S. Army, Task Force 1, was lost on June 4, 1971, in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. He was accounted for on Aug. 10, 2012.
  • Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, U.S. Air Force, was lost on March 11, 1968, in Houaphan Province, Laos, when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. He was accounted for on July 26, 2012.
  • Cpl. Francis J. Reimer, U.S. Army, M Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 12, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 19, 2012.
  • Cpl. Clarence H. Huff, Jr., U.S. Marine Corps, I Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 13, 2012.
  • PFC Richard S. Gzik, U.S. Marine Corps, M Battery, 11th Artillery Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was lost on Dec. 2 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir. He was accounted for on July 11, 2012.
  • PFC Richard W. Rivenburgh and PFC James R. Maxwell, U.S. Marine Corps, were lost on May 15, 1975, near Koh Tang Island, Cambodia. They were accounted for on June 25, and July 9, respectively.
  • Sgt. William T. Barker, U.S. Army, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost in February 1951, while in captivity in Pyokdong, North Korea. He was accounted for on June 30, 2012.
  • Sgt. Thomas J. Barksdale, B Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was lost on Nov. 30, 1950, near Ch'ongch'on, North Korea. He was accounted for on June 22, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class William T. Brown, Sgt. 1st Class Donald M. Shue and Sgt. 1st Class Gunther H. Wald , U.S. Army, 5th Special Forces Group, were lost on Nov. 3, 1969, in Quang Tri Province, Vietnam. They were accounted for on May 19, 2011, March 18, 2011, and May 30, 2012, respectively.

  • =========================================

http://www.phillyburbs.com/ap/state/nj/remains-of-pa-soldier-being-returned-to-nj/article_6601fc3e-d983-5437-b5aa-ebe1afe1454c.html

Remains of Pa. soldier being returned to NJ
Posted: Tuesday, December 25, 2012 5:45 am
Remains of Pa. soldier being returned to NJ   Associated Press |

MOUNT HOLLY, N.J. (AP) ? Remains of an eastern Pennsylvania soldier who died in a plane crash in the French-Italian Alps more than six decades ago are being returned to New Jersey for burial.

The Burlington County Times says services for Staff Sgt. Zoltan Dobovich of Allentown are to be held Wednesday and Thursday at the Perinchief Chapels in Mount Holly, N.J.
The POW/MIA Awareness Committee of New Jersey says Dobovich was one of eight soldiers killed when their Flying Fortress went down on Nov. 1, 1946 while flying from Naples to England. The wreckage was found in 1947 at 12,000 feet on the Estellette Glacier but individual remains couldn't be identified. More remains were found in the 1970s and early 1980s, and advances in DNA identification allowed Dobovich's remains to be identified....

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South Korea turns over remains of two US soldiers killed in Korean War
Stars and Stripes
Published: November 14, 2012

 
South Korea transferred the remains of two U.S. soldiers who went missing
during the Korean War to American custody during a ceremony Wednesday at the
National Cemetery in Seoul, according to the Ministry of National Defense.
 
The MND's Agency for Killed in Action Recovery and Identification found the
remains earlier this year at Gaemi Gogae in Chungnam province. Twelve
members of the U.S. Army's 3rd Battalion, 21st Regiment, 24th Division went
missing there during fighting against North Korean forces on July 11, 1950.....

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Published Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 1:00 am / Updated at 4:21 am

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Funeral set for Korean War soldier from Upstate NY

Updated 3:16 p.m., Thursday, November 8, 2012

SENECA FALLS, N.Y. (AP) — The American soldier's remains went by the label CIL1993-312 for years after their return from North Korea.

On Friday, Army Cpl. Elmer Kidd of the Finger Lakes town of Seneca Falls will be given a funeral and a military burial now that the remains have been identified by DNA testing more than 60 years after his death.

Kidd died in the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea in 1950, but it would be four years until the 26-year-old was declared killed in action, his niece, Linda Stuck, said.....

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http://www.gainesville.com/article/20121005/ARTICLES/121009719/-1/news?Title=Gainesville-soldier-killed-in-Korea-is-laid-to-rest

Gainesville soldier killed in Korea is laid to rest

photographer
Last Modified: Friday, October 5, 2012 at 7:22 p.m.
U.S. Army Capt. Turnace H. Brown's six-decade journey home from the Korean War ended Friday as the Gainesville soldier's remains were buried next to his parents in a burial with military honors attended by four generations of family.

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....As a result of the investigation, six of the Marines were identified earlier this year and buried as individuals at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, although this was not previously made public. With now all seven crew members identified, they will be buried as a group, in a single casket representing the crew, on Thursday at Arlington National Cemetery.

The seven victims were identified as Marine Corps 1st Lt. Laverne A. Lallathin of Raymond, Washington; 2nd Lt. Dwight D. Ekstam of Moline, Illinois; 2nd Lt. Walter B. Vincent, Jr. of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Tech. Sgt. James A. Sisney of Redwood City, California; Cpl. Wayne R. Erickson of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Cpl. John D. Yeager of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Pfc. John A. Donovan of Plymouth, Michigan.....

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10/03/2012
POW/MIA
dive team searching for remains off coast of France
Stars and Stripes
An underwater recovery team from the U.S. Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command arrived off the coast of France this week to search for an American servicemember missing since World War II. The 25-person team of JPAC specialists, civilian mariners from ...

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Gainesville soldier killed in Korea is laid to rest
Gainesville Sun
A military honor guard carried his flag-draped casket to the burial site past members of the Rolling Thunder and Patriot Guard motorcycle groups holding American and POW/MIA flags as well as veterans — including several from Korea — who stood in salute.....

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 791-12
October 02, 2012
Marines Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of seven servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being buried with full military honors. 

            Marine Corps 1st Lt. Laverne A. Lallathin of Raymond, Wash.; 2nd Lt. Dwight D. Ekstam of Moline, Ill.; 2nd Lt. Walter B. Vincent, Jr. of Tulsa, Okla.; Tech. Sgt. James A. Sisney of Redwood City, Calif.; Cpl. Wayne R. Erickson of Minneapolis; Cpl. John D. Yeager of Pittsburgh, Pa.; and Pfc. John A. Donovan of Plymouth, Mich., will be buried as a group, in a single casket representing the crew, on Oct. 4, in Arlington National Cemetery.  Six of the Marines were identified and buried as individuals previously this year.  Lallathin, also individually identified, will be interred individually at Arlington on the same day as the group interment.

            On April 22, 1944, the Marines were aboard a PBJ-1 aircraft that failed to return from a night training mission over the island of Espiritu Santo, in what is known today as Vanuatu.  None of the seven crew members were recovered at that time, and in 1945 they were officially presumed deceased. 

            In 1994, a group of private citizens notified the U.S. that aircraft wreckage had been found on the island of Espiritu Santo.  Human remains were recovered from the site at that time and turned over to the Department of Defense.

            In 1999, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) survey team traveled to the location.  The crash site was located at an elevation of 2,600 ft., in extremely rugged terrain, and the team determined that specialized mountain training would be necessary to safely complete a recovery mission.  From 2000 to 2011, multiple JPAC recovery teams excavated the site and recovered human remains, aircraft parts and military equipment.

            To identify the remains, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) evaluated circumstantial evidence and mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of the Marines' family members.

            Today, more than 73,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 781-12
September 28, 2012
Airman Missing from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Samuel E. Lunday, of Marianna, Fla., will be buried today, at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, DC.  On April 24, 1943, Lunday and four other U.S. servicemen were flying a C-87 Liberator Express aircraft over the Himalayan Mountains, from Yangkai, China, to their home base in Chabua, India.  After losing radio communications following take-off, the crew was never heard from again.  Eleven aerial search missions were unable to locate the aircraft or crew due to intense snows on the mountains at high altitudes, and dense jungle growth at lower altitudes. 

            As part of the war effort against the Japanese, U.S. Army Air Forces cargo planes based in India continually airlifted critical supplies over the high mountain ranges that comprise the Himalayas -- known as "The Hump" -- in support of American airbases in China.  The amount of materiel flown over the Himalayas was a logistical achievement unparalleled at the time.

            Almost 60 years later, in 2003, an American citizen discovered the wreckage of the C-87 aircraft while trekking in the mountains, approximately 100 miles from Chabua, near the Burmese border.  He recovered the aircraft's identification plate, military equipment and human remains.  The artifacts and remains were turned over to U.S. officials for analysis.  Attempts to excavate the site are being negotiated with the Indian government.

            To determine the identity of the remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of Lunday's nephews.

            Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1169 or visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 780-12
September 28, 2012
Marine Missing in Action from Korean War Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Marine Pfc. Richard S. Gzik, of Toledo, Ohio, will be buried today, at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, DC.  On Dec. 2, 1950, Gzik and the other Marines of M Battery, 11th Artillery Regiment, 1st Marine Division, came under attack on the west side of the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.  It was during this battle that Gzik was killed in action and his remains were buried alongside the road leading to Hagaru-ri.  Later that month, the withdrawal of U.N. forces from the Chosin Reservoir region made it impossible to recover Gzik's remains.

            In 1954, United Nations and Communist Forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory."  All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army Central Identification Unit for analysis.  Those which were unable to be identified, given the technology of that time, were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii -- the "Punchbowl." 

            In 2012, analysts from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) re-examined the case records and determined that advances in technology could likely aid in the identification of the unknown remains as Gzik.  Once the remains were exhumed, scientists from JPAC used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including dental records and radiographs, to validate Gzik's identification.  

            Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously buried as unknown.  Today, 7,947 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. 

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1169, or visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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http://missoulian.com/news/local/remains-of-soldier-missing-years-coming-home-to-victor/article_4500ab42-fc2e-11e1-ab65-001a4bcf887a.html

Remains of missing soldier returning to family

 
By Martin Kidson - The Missoulian via The Associated Press
Posted : Wednesday Sep 12, 2012 13:36:20 EDT

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Lucille Walker called him "Jay" for short. For many years, she didn't know her brother's real name was Luther. She was just 16 when she last saw him.

That was the winter of 1948, the holiday season, she believes. They were wearing coats she knows that much for sure.

"I remember a lot of things," Walker said on Tuesday. "My brother was a good guy. He loved kids. I try to think about it, and I can't remember ever having one argument with him."

Walker's brother, Cpl. Luther Jesse James, is coming home 62 years after the U.S. Army listed him as missing in action during the Korean War. His remains will arrive Wednesday in Spokane and his burial is set for Saturday in Hamilton.....

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 696-12
August 22, 2012


The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, has been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John E. Hogan, of West Plains, Mo., will be buried Aug. 24, in Arlington National Cemetery. On Sept. 13, 1944, Hogan and eight other crew members were on a B-17G Flying Fortress that crashed near Neustt-on-Werra, Germany.   Only one of the crewmen is known to have successfully parachuted out of the aircraft before it crashed.  The remaining eight crewmen were buried by German forces in a cemetery in Neustt.

 Following the war, U.S. Army Graves Registration personnel attempted to recover the remains of the eight men, but were only able to move the remains of one man to a U.S. military cemetery in Holland.   In 1953, with access to eastern Germany restricted by the Soviet Union, the remains of the seven unaccounted for crewmen were declared non-recoverable.

In 1991, a German national who was digging a grave in the cemetery in Neustädt, discovered a metal U.S. military identification tag and notified officials.  Due to German burial law, Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) wasn't granted access to the site until 2007 and excavated the location in 2008.  The team recovered human remains and additional metal identification tags from three of the crewmembers.

Scientists from JPAC used forensic identification tools, circumstantial evidence and mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of Hogan's cousin ? in the identification of his remains.

At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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After Six Decades, Slain Texas POW ID'd Through DNA

As American athletes come home from competing against the Chinese in the 2012 Summer Olympics medal count, it's hard to remember that a few decades ago, American soldiers were fighting the Chinese Army in the Korean War.

In late 1950, General Douglas MacArthur mobilized American forces for a military campaign that he called "Home by Christmas,"ť because the objective was to quickly win the war and get the troops home for the holidays. Instead, the Chinese attack at the Châ'ongchâ on River led to the retreat of American forces and a protracted war in Korea.

In the midst of that battle on December 1, a 21-year-old medical supervisor from Rockwall County, Texas was taken prisoner.

Reports say SFC William Travis Barker, of the all-African American 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was trying to administer aid to other soldiers when he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was taken to Puktong, a North Korean POW camp.....

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http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/oh_lake/funeral-service-to-be-held-62-years-after-missing-pow-died-in-korean-war-bittersweet-for-family

Funeral service to be held 62 years after missing POW died in Korean war, bittersweet for family

 
  •  

Posted: 07/09/2012

MENTOR, Ohio - After 62 years, missing POW, 18-year-old Army Cpl . Pryor Gobble, will be laid to rest in Mentor Wednesday giving his family a chance to finally say goodbye.

"It makes it great to know that he's finally coming home," said Cpl. Gobble's younger brother, Glenn Gobble.

Gobble said he finally has peace after 62 years of wondering what happened to his brother. He said Corporal Gobble was only 17 when he sent to the Korean War. He'd only spent a few months in basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, before he was shipped off. ...
 

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Wreckage found in Alaska glacier ID'd as 1952 military plane crash that killed 52
 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The wreckage of a military plane found near Knik Glacier earlier this month has been identified as a Korean War-era Air Force cargo plane that crashed in the 1950s, killing all 52 people on board, NBC station KTUU of Anchorage reported Wednesday.

The identification brings closure to victims' families after nearly 60 years, KTUU said.

Joint POW-MIA Accounting Command spokesperson Capt. Jamie Dobson said the wreckage, discovered June 10 on Colony Glacier, about 45 miles east of Anchorage, by a UH-60 Blackhawk crew with the Alaska Army National Guard-- is that of a Douglas C-124A Globemaster II that crashed on Nov. 22, 1952...

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http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/06/07/on-d-day-anniversary-marine-lost-in-wwii-finally-comes-home/?intcmp=obnetwork
 

Long-missing WWII Marine's remains brought home for burial

... Two months after the June 6, 1944, Normandy Invasion, Pfc. John A. Donovan and his bomber squadron flew a training mission on the south Pacific island known as Espiritu Santo -....

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/06/07/on-d-day-anniversary-marine-lost-in-wwii-finally-comes-home/?intcmp=obnetwork#ixzz1z7MEAqLp

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Return to Makin Island (Gilbert Islands) ...

Wow.

www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=C6f_FvZpm3g

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 529-12
June 25, 2012
Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Emil T. Wasilewski of Chicago will be buried on June 26 at Arlington National Cemetery.  On Sept. 13, 1944, Wasilewski and eight other crew members were on a B-17G Flying Fortress that crashed near Neustaedt-on-the-Werra, Germany.  Only one of the crewmen is known to have successfully parachuted out of the aircraft before it crashed.  The remaining eight crewmen were buried by German forces in a cemetery in Neustaedt. 

            Following the war, U.S. Army Graves Registration personnel attempted to recover the remains of the eight men, but were only able to move the remains of one man to a U.S. military cemetery in Holland.  In 1953, with access to eastern Germany restricted by the Soviet Union, the remains of the seven remaining unaccounted-for crewmen -- including Wasilewski --were declared non-recoverable.  

            In 1991, a German national who was digging a grave in the cemetery in Neustaedt discovered a metal U.S. military identification tag and notified officials.  German burial law restricted further site investigation until 2007, when the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) surveyed the area.  In 2008, the site was excavated and the team recovered human remains and military equipment.

            Scientists from the JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, including dental comparisons and Y-chromosome DNA -- which matched that of Wasilewski's nephew -- in the identification of his remains.

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 513-12
June 19, 2012

 
Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, were identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Cpl. Robert I. Wax of Detroit will be buried June 20 at Arlington National Cemetery.  In August 1950, Wax and Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, were fighting against North Korean forces in a battle known as the "Bloody Gulch," near Pongam-ni, South Korea.  After the battle, on Aug. 11, 1950, Wax was listed as missing in action.

            In late 1950, U.S. Army Graves Registration Service personnel recovered remains of service members from that battlefield, including nine men who were unidentified.  These men were buried at the 25th Infantry Division Cemetery in South Korea.  In 1951, the U.S. consolidated cemeteries on the peninsula.  The unknown remains were re-interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

            In 2011, due to advances in identification technology, the remains were exhumed for identification.  Based on available evidence such as metal identification tags, military clothing, and wartime records, analysts from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) were able to conclude that the remains were those of a soldier who died at Pongam-ni.

            Scientists from JPAC used the circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools including radiograph and dental comparisons in the identification of Wax.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.
 

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  • Cpl. Pryor Gobble, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 11, 1950 near Hagaru-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on May 23, 2012.
     
  • 1st Lt. Warren G. Moxley, U.S. Army Air Forces, 107th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, 9th Air Force, was lost on March 15, 1945, near Neustadt, Germany. He was accounted for on May 22, 2012.
     
  • Cpl. Kenneth R. Block, U.S. Army, M Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 3, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir, in North Korea. He was accounted for on May 18, 2012.
     
  • Radioman 1st Class Harry C. Scribner, U.S. Navy was lost on Aug. 22, 1943 when the TBF-1 Avenger aircraft on which he was a crewmember crashed on the island of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides (Vanuatu). He was accounted for on May 4, 2012.
     
  • 1st Lt. Laverne A. Lallathin, 2nd Lt. Dwight D. Ekstam, 2nd Lt. Walter B. Vincent, Jr., Tech. Sgt. James A. Sisney, Cpl. Wayne R. Erickson, Cpl. John D. Yeager, and Pfc. John A. Donovan, U.S. Marine Corps, were lost on April 22, 1944 when their PBJ-1 crashed over the island of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides (Vanuatu). They were identified on Jan. 24, 2012. They were accounted for on May 7, March 28, March 6, May 9, March 7, March 14, March 16 respectively.
  • Pfc. Gerald W. Kight,U.S. Army, 82nd Division, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, was lost on Sept. 28, 1944, near Groesbeek, Netherlands. He was accounted for on April 19, 2012.
  • Cpl. David L. Catlin,U.S. Army, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Dec. 2, 1950, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. He was accounted for on April 16, 2012.
  • Cpl. Clyde E. Anderson, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, assigned to the 31st Regimental Combat Team, was lost on Nov. 28, 1950, near Kaljon-ri, North Korea. He was accounted for on April 13, 2012.
  • Capt. Virgil K. Meroney III, U.S. Air Force, was lost on March 1, 1969 when the F-4D Phantom II that he was piloting was shot down in Khammouan Province, Laos. He was accounted for on April 11, 2012.
  • Pfc. Nelson E. Young, U.S. Army, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team, was captured on Dec. 2, 1950 near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea and died in late 1950 or early 1951. He was accounted for on March 30, 2012.

==================

ANN ARBOR: Remains of Marine missing in action for more than 60 years will be buried in Ann Arbor on Friday

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced Tuesday that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pfc. John A. Donovan, 20, of Plymouth, will be buried Friday, in Ann Arbor. Donovan was a crewmember aboard a PBJ-1 aircraft that failed to return from a night training mission over the island of Espiritu Santo, in what is known today as Vanuatu. None of the crew was recovered and in 1945 they were officially presumed deceased.....
 

===================================

http://www.tv5and10.com/news.php?id=5010

POW Finally Comes Home

Mon 5/28/12 5:43PM

This is a very special Memorial day for a copper country family who got to see one for their own finally laid to rest where he belongs.

It took more than 60 years but Private First Class Arthur Leiviska is finally home.
A special Memorial ay funeral service was held to honor this lost—but never forgotten hero.
Leviska served in the Korean War when he was captured in 1951 and later died in a prisoner of war camp.

=======================================

 http://www.denverpost.com/lacrosse/ci_20534081/korean-war-pows-remains-return-u-s-61

Korean War POW's remains return to U.S. 61 years after his death

Lafayette daughter was born while he was at war

LAFAYETTE -- The last wish of Josie Tibbitts' mother was to have her ashes laid in her husband's empty grave. That wish isn't going to come true -- and Tibbitts couldn't be happier for it.

That's because in a week, the remains of her father are coming home at last.

Master Sgt. Elwood Green died in the Korean War at the age of 33. That much has been known. But it was only this year that two pieces of reburied bone -- a tibia and part of the jaw -- were identified as belonging to Green, a prisoner of war who had been held at the site known as "Death Valley" and died in captivity. .....
 

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 292-12
April 19, 2012

 
Soldier Missing in Action from Korean War Identified


            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Pfc. Richard E. Clapp, 19, of Seattle, Wash., will be buried April 25, at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.

            On Sept. 2, 1950, Clapp and the C Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment came under fire near Yulchon, South Korea, and Clapp was killed in action.  The Army was unable to identify his remains at the time, and the remains were buried as "Unknown" in a military cemetery on the Korean Peninsula.

            In 1951, the U.S. consolidated cemeteries on the peninsula.  The unknown remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

            In 2011, due to advances in identification technology, the remains were exhumed for identification.  Scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools such as radiograph comparison, and dental records to identify Clapp.

            Today, more than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the Korean War.  Identifications continue to be made from the remains that were returned to the United States, using forensic and DNA technology.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-901-7097.

=====================

Tennessee soldier's body returns home after 61 years
The Tennessean
He disappeared during the Korean War after splitting from his platoon to take an enemy prisoner, an act of courage that earned him a Silver Star but not a proper burial — until now. “It was a huge weight off our shoulders,” said Beronica Vise, 44, ...
See all stories on this topic »

----------------------------------

After 62 years, remains of Korean war vet returned to Tri-State
14 News WFIE Evansville
Friday afternoon, a procession led by city police and POW MIA group Rolling Thunder bringing him home proved to be a patriotic and emotional day for all......
 

Brashear

==================================

DPMO - Recently Accounted-For

Starting in 2012, recently accounted for service members will be listed in the chronological order that they are accounted for, which means that the families have been notified. In previous years, they were listed by the date of identification. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • Master Sgt. Elwood Green, U.S. Army, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division was captured on Nov. 28, 1950 and died in 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Mar. 1, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Richard L. Harris, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division was captured on Nov. 30, 1950 and died in Jan. 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Feb. 29, 2012.
  • 2nd Lt. Charles R. Moritz, U.S. Army Air Forces, of the 496th Fighter Training Group was lost on June 7, 1944 when his P-51 C Mustang crashed near Goxhill airfield, England. He was accounted for on Feb. 26, 2012.
  • Staff Sgt. Ahmed K. al-Taie, U.S. Army, was lost on Oct. 23, 2006 while serving in Iraq as a translator for the U.S. military. He was accounted for on Feb. 25, 2012.
  • Lt. Col. Robert M. Brown,U.S. Air Force, 6280th Combat Support Group, was lost on Nov. 7, 1972, near Quang Binh Province, North Vietnam. He was accounted for on Feb. 25, 2012 .

======================================

 
Korean War POW laid to rest in Evergreen Park

The remains of a Korean War POW have finally been laid to rest.

 

Army Corporal Chester Roper's family gathered this Friday in Evergreen Park to pay their final respects.

Roper was captured in 1950 by enemy forces during the Korean War. He was reported missing in action and died in 1951 at a prison war camp. .......

==========================

Remains of Korean War POW returned to Chicago family

Dental records, bone help identify corporal 60 years after his death
[pic]

Family members hold a photo of Chester Roper, who died as a POW in the Korean… (Antonio Perez, Chicago Tribune)
March 21, 2012|By Becky Schlikerman, Chicago Tribune reporter

For 60 years, Army Cpl. Chester Roper's family wondered what happened to the  young man who went to fight in the Korean War.

All they knew was that the 20-year-old from Pittsburgh went missing and was never heard from again.......

----------------------------------------------------

http://www2.tbo.com/news/news/2012/mar/09/us-mia-mission-to-north-korea-raises-hopes-for-fam-ar-367217/

U.S. MIA mission to North Korea raises hopes for families

On July 15, 1950, PFC John Duffield Franklin Jr. was dug in along the south bank of the Kum River, waiting for an attack by the North Korean People's Army.

Franklin and the rest of the men of the 19th Infantry Regiment — among the first U.S. troops called in to repulse the North Korean invasion — had successfully repelled several advances. But on this morning they were overwhelmed.

Franklin was captured and eventually taken to the infamous Apex Camps up the south bank of the Yalu River in North Korea. Exposed to horrific conditions, cramped quarters, rampant lice and disease, and with little food, Franklin died in June 1951....

-----------------------------------------------------------

 

67 years later, remains of Army pilot from Sacramento return

 

Published: Saturday, Jan. 7, 2012 - 12:00 am | Page 1B
Last Modified: Friday, Jun. 1, 2012 - 5:11 pm

A Sacramento hero has finally come home to his family, 67 years after his fighter plane was shot down in one of the bloodiest battles of World War II.

On Thursday, two Army officials solemnly handed a small box with the remains of 2nd Lt. Hilding Roy Johnson to his brother. The quiet meeting at Bob Johnson's home in Chico ended a six-year family odyssey to find, identify and return the remains of a 20-year-old pilot whose P-47 Thunderbolt crashed in a Belgian field onChristmas Day in 1944.

"It's so overwhelming," said his niece, Dawn Johnson, an archeologist who prodded the military to recover her uncle's remains after she traveled to Belgium and found bone fragments at the crash site. "It's so right that he's home. But the fact that my grandmother isn't here is so heartbreaking. It's bittersweet."....

Recently Accounted-For

http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/

The names listed here are U.S. military servicemembers who were once missing and are now accounted-for. Additional information may be seen by visiting the respective Vietnam, Korean War and WWII databases on this site.

These names are displayed in chronological order based on the accounted-for date. The highlighted names are linked to a more detailed news release on that serviceman's identification.

  • Master Sgt. Elwood Green, U.S. Army, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division was captured on Nov. 28, 1950 and died in 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Mar. 1, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Richard L. Harris, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division was captured on Nov. 30, 1950 and died in Jan. 1951 in a POW Camp in North Korea. He was accounted for on Feb. 29, 2012.
  • 2nd Lt. Charles R. Moritz, U.S. Army Air Forces, of the 496th Fighter Training Group was lost on June 7, 1944 when his P-51 C Mustang crashed near Goxhill airfield, England. He was accounted for on Feb. 26, 2012.
  • Staff Sgt. Ahmed K. al-Taie, U.S. Army, was lost on Oct. 23, 2006 while serving in Iraq as a translator for the U.S. military. He was accounted for on Feb. 25, 2012.
  • Cpl. Robert I. Wax, U.S. Army, of Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, was lost on Aug. 11, 1950 near Pongam-ni, South Korea. He was accounted for on Feb. 23, 2012 .
  • Cpl. James N. Larkin, U.S. Army, C Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, was captured on Feb. 11, 1951, and died in captivity in April 1951. He was accounted for on Feb. 21, 2012.
  • Cpl. Henry F. Johnson, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment was captured on Nov. 25 1950, and died in captivity in 1951. He was accounted for on Feb. 15, 2012.
  • 2nd Lt. Emil T. Wasilewski, U.S. Army Air Forces, was lost when his B-17G was shot down on Sept. 13, 1944 during a bombing mission over Merseburg, Germany. He was accounted for on Feb. 11, 2012.
  • Pvt. Arthur W. Leiviska, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, who was captured in 1951 and died in captivity on April 20, 1951 He was accounted for on Feb. 3, 2012.
  • Cpl. Dick E. Osborne, U.S. Army, L Company, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was lost on Nov. 2, 1950, near Unsan, North Korea. He was accounted for on Jan. 27, 2012.
  • Pfc. Frank P. Jennings, U.S. Army, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment was lost near Jeon-Gog, South Korea on April 25, 1951. He was accounted for on Jan. 18, 2012.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Edris A. Viers, U.S. Army, Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, was lost near Pongam-ni, South Korea on Aug. 12, 1950. He was accounted for on Jan. 17, 2012.
  • Cpl. William R. Sluss, U.S. Army, Service Battery, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was captured by enemy forces in late Nov. 1950, near Kunu-ri, North Korea, and died at POW Camp 5 in April 1951. He was accounted for on Jan. 17, 2012.
  • Cpl. Chester J. Roper, U.S. Army, Battery A, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was captured by enemy forces on Dec. 1, 1950 near Somindong, North Korea, and died in early 1951 in POW Camp 5 at Pyoktong. He was accounted for on Jan. 4, 2012.

Recently Accounted-For Archive:
2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 |
2007

============================================

http://wvgazette.com/News/201112020182

World War II vet's remains returned to U.S.

 
He disappeared nearly 70 years ago, leaving his family wondering whatever happened to him.

But they're not wondering anymore.

This week his remains were flown back to the U.S. and the family's mystery is finally solved.

67 years is a long time for a homecoming.

"People ask how do you feel? I am emotional, but I'm more glad that he's home." Said the vet's niece, Mary Jo Urban.

It was September 1944 when 28 year old Staff Sergeant John Bono of Denver and his crew of eight others crashed their plane in
Germany..........

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http://www.military.com/military-report/x-rays-identify-korean-war-pow-mia?ESRC=miltrep.nl

X-Rays Identify Korean War POW-MIA

Over the past six years, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command has retrieved 14,200 chest radiographs (X-rays) representing about 6,400 GIs missing from Korea. The data has become key in the identification of  867 Korea War veterans buried as "unknowns" at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl. Comparisons from the X-Rays are among several lab advances made in the past several years. For more information on JPAC's work in investigating, recovering and identifying missing American war dead, visit the JPAC website at www.jpac.pacom.mil/.

For more military and veteran-related news, visit the Military.com News Center.

=======================================

 http://www.kens5.com/news/local/Fallen-Korean-War-POW-finally-returns-home-to-San-Antonio-134427228.html

Fallen Korean War POW finally returns home to San Antonio

by Brian New / KENS 5

Posted on November 23, 2011 at 5:24 PM
 

Updated yesterday at 7:05 PM

 

SAN ANTONIO - On a day with so many homecomings, perhaps none was more overdue than the homecoming of Jimmie Gaitan.

It's been more than sixty years.

"It's been an emotional whirlwind," said his nephew, Manuel Adams, while waiting at the San Antonio International Airport.

But for Gaitan's family this was not so much a welcome as a goodbye.

Private First Class Giatan died in 1951 as Prisoner of War in North Korea. He had been captured while tending to his injured comrades during a battle in South Korea. Giatan, an Army Medic, was 21-years-old........

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KOREA/COLD WAR ANNUAL GOVERNMENT

BRIEFINGS

September 1-2 2011

KOREAN WAR IDENTIFICATIONS

1982 1                     2002 3

1987 1                     2003 5

1993 1                     2004 10

1994 4                     2005 9

1995 1                     2006 20

1996 4                     2007 20

1997 0                     2008 24

1998 0                     2009 22

1999 2                     2010 21

2000 5                     2011 18

                                                                                2001 6

-------------------------------------------------------------

TOTAL 177

 

IN MY OPINION by Irene Mandra  10/27/2011

Dear Members,

DPMO did a fantastic job at the annual Korea/Cold War annual meeting which took place September 1 & 2, 2011 in Virginia. I realize it’s a tremendous amount of work on their part and I truly appreciate their effort. I have one large disappointment which occurred this year and I sincerely hope that this will never happen again. This is the first year that we did not receive packets at our meeting. I guess it has not occurred to members at DPMO that many of our families are not on computer, therefore they have nothing to take home and read what exactly the Department of Defense is doing to locate and bring them closure on the status of their missing loved ones.

It was very good of DOD to put this information on their web site, again forgetting that they are dealing with an older population, who found the print hard to read, half of the 500 attending are not on computer. In the past if we had a question we could ask our friends at DPMO for an explanation, there at the general meeting. Now we have to go to a web site, (of course those who know how) and what we don’t understand there is no one to enlighten us.

I realize that DOD wishes to save money but let me make my position very clear, and let me emphasize how angry I am. STOP TRYING TO SAVE MONEY ON THE BACK’S OF THE FAMILIES. Your job is to help us deal with a great loss and give us understanding on what our government is doing to give us closure and accountability on the fate of our missing loved ones. Please understand our position.

As the holidays are fast approaching we think and miss our loved ones who are still missing. We still wait for the Russians to tell us who they took and when will they ever give us the answers we so desire. The Chinese seem like a hopeless cause. As far as our loved ones go their presence we miss, their memory we treasure. Loving him always, forgetting him never.

As the saying goes, remembering them is easy, I do it every day, but there’s an ache within my heart that will never go away. You could apply that saying to any loved one that you lost.

We look forward to 2012, if and when we get back into North Korea, and some families will have the closure after sixty some odd years.

The Board and I wish you a Happy Thanksgiving, and a Happy Holiday Season.

Irene

================================

Korean War POW's remains returning to Indiana family

WILLIAMSPORT, Ind. — The family of an Indiana soldier who died while a prisoner during the Korean War plans to bury his remains next to his mother some six decades after he died.

Pfc. Henry Martin Gustafson’s remains were among those of about 400 American servicemen returned by North Korea in 1993 from mass burial grounds. Military officials notified Gustafson’s family in June that his remains had been identified.....

=======================================


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 897-11
October 21, 2011

 
Aircrew Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

     The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of 10 servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

     Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Robert R. Bishop of Joliet, Ill.; 2nd Lt. Thomas Digman, Jr. of Pittsburgh; 2nd Lt. Donald W. Hess of Sioux City, Iowa; 2nd Lt. Arthur W. Luce, of Fort Bragg, Calif.; Staff Sgt. Joseph J. Karaso, of Philadelphia; Staff Sgt. Ralph L. McDonald of East Point, Ga.; Sgt. John P. Bonnassiolle of Oakland, Calif.; Sgt. James T. Blong of Port Washington, Wis.; Sgt. Michael A. Chiodo of Cleveland; and Sgt. John J. Harringer, Jr. of South Bend, Ind., will be buried as a group, in a single casket representing the entire crew, on Oct. 26, in Arlington National Cemetery. Hess and Karaso will be interred individually in Arlington National Cemetery.

     On April 29, 1944, the 10 airmen were ordered to carry out a bombing mission over Berlin, Germany, in their B-24J Liberator aircraft, piloted by Bishop and Luce. German documents captured after the war noted that the aircraft crashed near the town of East Meitze, Germany, and there were no survivors. German forces buried the remains of Digman, Blong, and one unknown airman in a cemetery near Hannover, Germany, around the time of the crash. In 1946, the Army Graves Registration Service exhumed the remains of the three individuals for identification and reburied them in a U.S. Military Cemetery in Condroz, Belgium.

     In 2003, a German national located the site of the crash and recovered human remains, which were turned over to U.S. officials. In 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) team excavated the crash site and gathered additional human remains, military equipment, and metal identification tags for Bishop, Blong, Bonnassiolle, and Harringer. The team also recovered a class ring with the initials AWL -- presumably belonging to Luce. In 2007, a JPAC team completed the site excavation and found additional evidence that helped to confirm the identity of the crew.

     Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used dental analysis and mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of some of the crewmembers' families -- in the identification of their remains.

     At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 73,000 remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

     For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

==========================================


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 856-11
October 05, 2011

 
U.S. Soldier MIA from Korean War Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Cpl. Edward M. Pedregon of El Paso, Texas, will be buried on Oct. 6 in Arlington National Cemetery.  A memorial service was held in San Elizario, Texas, on Oct. 1.  In late November 1950 Pedregon and the Heavy Mortar Company, of the 31st Regimental Combat Team  known as Task Force Faith  were overrun by Chinese forces near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.  After several days of heavy attacks, Task Force Faith was forced to withdraw, but was stopped by enemy blockades that overpowered them on Dec. 2, 1950.  Pedregon was reported missing in action on Nov. 30, 1950.

            In 1953, following the exchange of all prisoners of war by both sides of the conflict, no further information was gained to indicate that Pedregon had been held as a prisoner of war, and he was declared dead.

            In 2004, a joint U.S./Korean People's Army team excavated several sites in the Chosin Reservoir area and recovered the remains of at least nine individuals and military equipment.  The location of the remains corresponds to the positions temporarily held by elements of Task Force Faith in late November 1950.

            Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used dental records, and mitochondrial DNA  which matched that of Pedregon's mother and brotherin the identification of the remains.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

===============================================


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 805-11
September 20, 2011

 
Airmen Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

     The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of nine servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

     Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William J. Sarsfield of Philadelphia; 2nd Lt. Charles E. Trimingham of Salinas, Calif.; Tech. Sgt. Robert L. Christopherson of Blue Earth, Minn.; and Tech. Sgt. Leonard A. Gionet of Shirley, Mass., will be buried as a group in a single casket on Sept. 21 in Arlington National Cemetery, along with remains representing previously identified crew members 2nd Lt. Herman H. Knott, 2nd Lt. Francis G. Peattie, Staff Sgt. Henry Garcia, Staff Sgt. Robert E. Griebel, and Staff Sgt. Pace P. Payne, who were individually buried in 1985. These nine airmen were ordered to carry out a bombing mission over Rabaul, Papau New Guinea (P.N.G.), in their B-17E Flying Fortress nicknamed Naughty but Nice, taking off from an airfield near Dobodura, P.N.G., on June 26, 1943. The aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire and ultimately shot down by Japanese fighter aircraft. A tenth man, the navigator and only survivor of the crash -- 2nd Lt. Jose L. Holguin -- was held as a prisoner of war until his release in September 1945.

     In 1949, U.S. military personnel in the area were led by local citizens to a B-17 crash site on New Britain Island. Remains were recovered but couldn't be identified given the technology of the time. The remains were buried as unknown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

     In 1982 and 1983, Holguin returned to the area and located the crash site. A fragment of the aircraft nose art was recovered and is displayed in the War Museum in Kokopo, P.N.G. In 1985, the remains were exhumed and identified as Knott, Payne, Garcia, Peattie, and Griebel. In 2001, a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) excavated the site and found additional human remains and crew-related equipment.

     Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of some of the crewmembers' families -- in the identification of their remains.

     At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted for from the conflict.

     For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

---------------------------------------------------

IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 692-11
August 08, 2011


 
Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being buried with full military honors. 

            Army Pfc. William F. Stehlin of Dayton, Ky., will be buried on Aug. 11 in Arlington National Cemetery.  On Nov. 20, 1944, Stehlin, as part of the 333rd Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division, went missing near S?gerath while his unit conducted a largely successful offensive to capture towns in Western Germany. In 1951, after an extensive search, his remains were determined unrecoverable by U.S. Army Graves Registration personnel.

            In 2009, a German citizen digging in a wooded area near S?gerath, discovered a grave with the remains of two individuals, military-related equipment and identification tags. 

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command laboratory also used dental comparisons in the identification of the remains.  The other individual, Pfc. Edward L. O'Toole, was identified and buried on July 15 in San Bruno, Calif.

            Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

=========================================

 

Remains of POW return home after 60 years

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) -- A U.S. Army private from New York who died in a Korean War POW camp 60 years ago has finally returned home, his family said.

The remains of Pvt. John Lavelle, of Brooklyn, New York, reached Kennedy Airport Saturday, the New York Daily News reported.......

=================================================


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 660-11
July 28, 2011


 
Missing World War II Soldiers Indentified
 

                  The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced Monday that the remains 12 U.S. servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors. 

                  They are Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Jack E. Volz, 21, of Indianapolis; 2nd Lt. Regis E. Dietz, 28, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; 2nd Lt. Edward J. Lake, 25, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; 2nd Lt. Martin P. Murray, 21, of Lowell, Mass.; 2nd Lt. William J. Shryock, 23, of Gary, Ind.; Tech. Sgt. Robert S. Wren, 25, of Seattle, Wash.; Tech. Sgt. Hollis R. Smith, 22, of Cove, Ark.; Staff Sgt. Berthold A. Chastain, 27, Dalton, Ga.; Staff Sgt. Clyde L. Green, 24, Erie, Pa.; Staff Sgt. Frederick E. Harris, 23, Medford, Mass.; Staff Sgt. Claude A. Ray, 24, Coffeyville, Kan.; and Staff Sgt. Claude G. Tyler, 24, Landover, Md. The remains representing the entire crew will be buried as a group, in a single casket, Aug. 4 in Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.  Eight of the airmen were identified and buried as individuals during previous ceremonies.  Shryock, Green and Harris were also individually identified and will be interred individually at Arlington on the same day as the group interment. 

                  These 12 airmen were ordered to carry out a reconnaissance mission in their B-24D Liberator, taking off from an airfield near Port Moresby, New Guinea, on Oct. 27, 1943. Allied plans were being formulated to mount an attack on the Japanese redoubt at Rabaul, New Britain.  American strategists considered it critical to take Rabaul in order to support the eventual invasion of the Philippines.  The crew's assigned area of reconnaissance was the nearby shipping lanes in the Bismarck Sea.  But during their mission, they were radioed to land at a friendly air strip nearby due to poor weather conditions.  The last radio transmission from the crew did not indicate their location, and in the following weeks, multiple searches over land and sea areas did not locate the aircraft. 

                  Following World War II, the Army Graves Registration Service conducted investigations and searches for 43 missing airmen, including these airmen, in the area but concluded in June 1949 that they were unrecoverable.

                  In August 2003, a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) received information on a crash site from a citizen in Papua New Guinea while they were investigating another case.  He also turned over an identification card from one of the crew members and reported that there were possible human remains at the site of the crash.  Twice in 2004 other JPAC teams attempted to visit the site but were unable to do so due to poor weather and hazardous conditions at the helicopter landing site.  Another team was able to successfully excavate the site from January to March 2007 where they found several identification tags from the B-24D crew as well as human remains. 

                  Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA - which matched that of some of the crewmembers' families - in the identification of their remains.

                 Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died.  At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

                  For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.    

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 623-11
July 18, 2011
Missing World War II Soldiers Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of three servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

            Army Pfc. Lawrence N. Harris, of Elkins, W.V., Cpl. Judge C. Hellums, of Paris, Miss., and Pvt. Donald D. Owens, of Cleveland, will be buried as a group, in a single casket, on July 20 in Arlington National Cemetery.  In late September 1944, their unit, the 773rd Tank Battalion, was fighting its way east to France's eastern border, clearing German forces out of the Parroy Forest near Lun?ille.  On Oct. 9, 1944, in the final battle for control of the region, Hellums, Harris, Owens and two other soldiers were attacked by enemy fire in their M-10 Tank Destroyer.  Two men survived with serious injuries but Harris, Hellums and Owens were reported to have been killed. Evidence at the time indicated the remains of the men had been destroyed in the attack and were neither recovered nor buried near the location.

            In November 1946, a French soldier working in the Parroy Forest found debris associated with an M-10 vehicle and human remains, which were turned over to the American Graves Registration Command.  The remains were buried as unknowns in what is now known as the Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium.  A year later the AGRC returned to the Parroy Forest to conduct interviews and search for additional remains.  Investigators noted at that time that all remains of U.S. soldiers had reportedly been removed in the last two years and that the crew was likely buried elsewhere as unknowns.

            In 2003, a French citizen exploring the Parroy Forest discovered human remains and an identification bracelet engraved with Hellums' name, from a site he had probed occasionally since 1998.  The information was eventually sent to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC).  In April 2006, the man turned over the items to a JPAC team working in Europe.  A few months later a second JPAC team returned to the site and recovered more human remains, personal effects and an identification tag for Owens.

            Historians at DPMO and JPAC continued their research on the burials at the Ardennes Cemetery, and drew a correlation to those unknowns removed from the 1944 battle site.   In early 2008 JPAC disinterred these remains and began their forensic review.

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons for the men and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of each soldier's relatives in the identification of their remains.

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 72,000 remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, call 571-422-9059 or visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo .

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http://www.postcrescent.com/article/20110710/APC0101/107100524/Wreckage-downed-WWII-fighter-plane-found-last-month-gives-family-closure?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|FRONTPAGE

Wreckage of a downed WWII fighter plane found in Germany last month - more than 66 years after it went missing - gives Outagamie judge John Des Jardins and his family closure

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 539-11
June 22, 2011

 
Airmen Missing In Action from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of five Army Air Forces servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and returned to their families for burial with full military honors. 

            Capt. Leonard E. Orcutt, Alameda, Calif., was buried on May 5 in Oakland, Calif; Tech. Sgt. Louis H. Miller, Philadelphia, was buried on June 17 in Arlington National Cemetery; Staff Sgt. George L. Winkler, Huntington, W.Va., was buried May 5 in Arlington National Cemetery;  2nd Lt. Harry L. Bedard, Minneapolis, will be buried on June 25 in Dayton, Minn.; and 2nd Lt. Robert S. Emerson, Norway, Maine, will be buried July 9 in his hometown.

            On April 3, 1945, Orcutt and his crew took off in their B-25J Mitchell bomber from Palawan Field, Philippines.  The pilot of another aircraft in the flight reported seeing Orcutt's plane stall out and crash about one mile northeast of the village of Consolacion in a swampy area. There were no survivors.

            In early 1947, personnel from the Army's Graves Registration Service recovered additional remains from the crash site and buried them as unknowns in Leyte, Philippines.  Later that year, they were exhumed and transferred to Manila for possible identification.  In 1949, a military review board declared these unknown group remains to be those of the aircrew and re-buried them at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.

            Two years later, the Graves Registration Service returned to the crash site and recovered additional remains.  The case was reanalyzed and a recommendation was made that the group remains at Jefferson Barracks be disinterred for individual identification.  All remains from the crash site were examined with no resulting identification.  They were reburied at the same location.  A sister of one of the airmen contacted the Army in 2001 upon learning of the recovery of additional remains in the 1950s.  The Army then disinterred the group remains at Jefferson Barracks in 2008 which were taken to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in Hawaii for identification.

            Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of relatives of the aircrew -- in the identification of these airmen. 

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)

==============================


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 531-11
June 20, 2011
Airman Missing in Action From WWII Identified
 

                 The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors. 

                 Army Staff Sgt. Marvin J. Steinford, of Keystone, Iowa, will be buried on June 21 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  On March 24, 1945, Steinford, along with nine other crew members, bailed out of their B-17G Flying Fortress bomber over Gic, Hungary.  It had been hit by enemy anti-aircraft fire while on a bombing mission over Germany.  Steinford and another crew member were struck by small arms fire while parachuting into a firefight between Soviet and German forces.  The remains of the other crew member were found after the war where they had been buried by Hungarian villagers.  The remaining eight members of the aircrew were captured by the Germans, held as POWs, and released at the end of the war.

                 According to accounts gathered by U.S. Army Graves Registration Service personnel in the late 1940s, Steinford's body was seen beside a German tank near Gic, but no further details about his exact whereabouts were recorded.  Growing tensions in Soviet-controlled Eastern Europe closed off further U.S. access to Hungary.

                 In January 2003, in an effort to develop archival leads in Hungary from the Vietnam War, Korean and Cold Wars and World War II, a U.S. commissioner with the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs met with Hungarian officials in Budapest.  Additional follow-up in Hungary by a DPMO researcher began to uncover specific information related to Steinford's loss.  A second DPMO staff member, assisted by Hungarian academics and researchers, discovered archives and interviewed villagers who related first-hand information about the B-17G crash.  Shortly thereafter the U.S. Embassy in Budapest notified DPMO that a local cemetery director had information directly related to Steinford. 

                 He related that during a 2004 excavation and transfer of Soviet soldiers' remains at a war memorial and grave site in the city of Zirc, Hungarian workers discovered remains with a set of identification tags that bore Steinford's name.  The dog tags were removed and all remains were transferred to another site on the outskirts of Zirc.  What was believed to be Steinford's remains were marked with the Hungarian word "Cedulas," [translation: the one with the tags] and reburied.  The dog tags were returned to U.S. officials in March 2005.

                 From 2005 through late 2007, DPMO facilitated negotiations between U.S., Hungarian and Russian officials.  Finally, in December 2007, the U.S. chairman of the commission secured agreement with the Russian first deputy minister of defense to allow a July 2009 exhumation from the war memorial site by specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command. 

                 Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons in the identification of Steinford's remains.  

                 At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 73,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

                 For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo.  Photos are available of Steinford and can be obtained by calling 703-699-1169.

U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)

====================================

http://www.twincities.com/ci_18158749
At rest, at home, at last: A Minnesota soldier lost in the Korean War comes home for burial
Sgt. Ralph Carlson is coming home, 60 years too late. .....

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 500-11
June 13, 2011

 
Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Cpl. A.V. Scott, 27, of Detroit, Mich., will be buried June 22 at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.  On Feb. 12, 1951, Scott's unit, the 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was supplying friendly forces approximately 70 miles east of Seoul, South Korea, when Chinese Communist units attacked the area and forced a withdrawal.  Scott was captured by enemy forces and marched north to a prisoner-of-war camp in Suan County, North Korea.  Surviving POWs within the camp reported Scott died in April 1951.

            Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of remains believed to contain the remains of 200 to 400 U.S. servicemen.  North Korean documents turned over with one of the boxes indicated the remains were exhumed near Suan County, which correlates with Scott's last known location. 

            Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental comparisons, and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of Scott's cousins, in the identification.  

            More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War.  With this identification, 7,993 service members remain missing from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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Korean War POW Home after 60 Years

Published : Friday, 27 May 2011, 11:32 AM CDT

By Kevin Boie | MYFOXDFW.COM

DALLAS - The body of a Korean War prisoner morning returned home to North Texas on Friday after more than 60 years.

The remains of Army Pfc. Floyd Coker arrived from Hawaii at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport to a small crowd of family members, police and military personnel, and North Texas Patriot Guard Riders.......

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Remains of missing Korean War POW to return to Paris, TX
WFAA
The Joint POW MIA command pieced his remains back together after they were returned almost a decade ago. "My uncle was in five different crates," Harris ...

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 397-11
May 11, 2011

 
U.S. Soldier MIA from Korean War Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Cpl. Primo C. Carnabuci of Old Saybrook, Conn., will be buried May 12 in his hometown.  On Nov. 1, 1950, Carnabuci's unit, the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, occupied a defensive position along the Kuryong River, near Unsan, North Korea.  Chinese units attacked the area and forced a withdrawal.  Almost 600 men, including Carnabuci, were reported missing or killed in action following the battle. 

            In 2000, a joint U.S-Democratic People's Republic of Korea team, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), excavated a mass grave discovered earlier in Unsan County, south of the area known as "Camel's Head."  The team recovered remains of at least five individuals as well as military clothing. 

            Analysts from DPMO and JPAC developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years.  They evaluated the circumstances surrounding the soldier's death and researched wartime documentation on the movements of U.S. and enemy forces on the battlefield.

            Among forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of Carnabuci's brother -- in the identification.

            With this identification, 7,997 service members still remain missing from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1420.

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 381-11
May 04, 2011

Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified


            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors. 

            Pfc. Robert B. Bayne, of Dundalk, Md., will be buried on May 7 in his hometown.  On March 28, 1945, while patrolling the Rhine River in an inflatable raft, Bayne, a lieutenant and two other enlisted men were attacked near Schwegenheim, Germany.  Bayne and the officer were wounded, forcing all four men into the swift waters of the river.  The lieutenant was rescued but the enlisted men were not found.

            Between 1945 and 1946, Army Graves Registration personnel exhumed remains of three men from two different locations when German citizens reported the graves contained remains of American soldiers recovered from the river in March 1945.  Among items found with the remains were military identification tags.  Two of the men were identified as enlisted men from the raft -- Pvt. Edward Kulback and Pfc. William Gaffney -- but due to limited forensic science of the time, the remains of the other individual could not be identified and were interred at the U.S. Military Cemetery in St. Avold, France as "unknown."

            In 1948, the remains of the unknown soldier were exhumed to compare them to available records for Bayne.  After several years of analysis the remains could not be identified and were reinterred as unknown at the Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial in Draguignan, France, in 1951.

            More than 60 years later, analysts from DPMO and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) developed case leads, evaluated records and determined that modern forensic technology could offer methods to identify the remains.  In 2010, the remains were exhumed once again for analysis.

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC used dental comparisons and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of Bayne's brothers -- in the identification of his remains.

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

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Korean War hero finally gets the honor he deserves
Fort Worth Star Telegram
"I've looked through many citations for the Silver Star and DSC, and the names of places are often wrong," he said. "They're often phonetic spellings. There is no y at the end of any town's name in Korea." In one of his last letters to his mother, ...
 

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News

American Forces Press Service

Obama Awards Medal of Honor to Korean War Soldiers

By Terri Moon Cronk
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, May 2, 2011 – President Barack Obama presented the Medal of Honor posthumously today to the families of two soldiers who served in the Korean War.

Obama honored Army Pfcs. Anthony T. Kaho’ohanohano and Henry Svehla, who were killed in action.

“These two soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice when they were just 19 and 21 years old,” the president said. “In the hearts of their families, they remain forever young. Today, we honor them with the highest military decoration that our nation can bestow: the Medal of Honor. In so doing, we also honor their families, who remind us that it is our extraordinary military families who also bear the heavy burden of war.”

Kaho’ohanohano was honored for his actions Sept. 1, 1951, while in charge of a machine-gun squad with Company H, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. When faced by an enemy of overwhelming numbers, Kaho’ohanohano ordered his squad to take up more defensible positions and provide covering fire for the withdrawing friendly force. Even though he was injured in his shoulder, he gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone -- delivering deadly accurate fire into the ranks of the onrushing enemy.

When his ammunition was depleted, Kaho’ohanohano engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat until he was killed. His comrades then launched a counterattack that completely drove back the enemy.

Kaho’ohanohano’s brother, Eugene, accepted the Medal of Honor on his brother’s behalf. A sister, Elaine, also attended.

“For the sacrifice that your family endured, for the service that your family has rendered -- thank you so much,” Obama said. “Mahalo nui loa,” he added, Hawaiian for “thank you.”

The citation for Svehla’s medal described his actions June 12, 1952, while the New Jersey native was serving in Korea as a rifleman with Company F, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

Coming under heavy fire and with his platoon’s attack beginning to falter, Svehla leapt to his feet and charged the enemy positions, firing his weapon and throwing grenades as he advanced. Disregarding his own safety, he destroyed enemy positions and inflicted heavy casualties. When an enemy grenade landed among a group of his comrades, he threw himself on the grenade and was mortally wounded.

“Henry Svehla’s body has never been recovered,” Obama said. “That’s a wound in the heart of his family that has never been fully healed. It’s also a reminder that, as a nation, we must never forget those who didn’t come home, are missing in action, who were taken prisoner of war -- and we must never stop trying to bring them back to their families.”

Svehla’s sister, Dorothy Mathews, accompanied by her sister, Sylvia Svehla, accepted the medal.

“Behind every American who wears a uniform,” Obama said, “stands a family that serves with them. Behind every American who lays down his life for our country is a family that mourns them, and honors them for the rest of their lives.”

Before the ceremony, Obama said the death of Osama bin Laden yesterday showed that the nation kept its commitment so that justice was done.

“As a nation, there’s nothing we can’t do when we put our shoulders to the wheel, when we work together, when we remember the sense of unity that defines us as Americans,” he said.

Dignitaries at the ceremony included Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen and vice chairman Marine Corps Gen. James E. Cartwright, and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki.

“I could not be prouder of our men and women in uniform,” the president said. “That is true now, in today's wars. It has been true in all of our wars. And it is why we are here today.”
 

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 334-11
April 22, 2011


 
Missing WWII Airman Identified
 

              The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

              U.S. Army Air Forces Pfc. Mervyn E. Sims, 23, of Petaluma, Calif., will be buried Friday in his hometown.  On April 24, 1943, Sims and four crew members aboard a C-87 Liberator Express departed from Yangkai, China, in support of "the Hump" resupply mission between India and China.  Prior to takeoff, a ground crew determined the aircraft had sufficient fuel for the six-hour flight to the air base on other side of the Himalayas in Chabua, India.  Once cleared for takeoff, there was no further communication between the aircrew and airfield operators.  Army officials launched a search effort when the plane did not arrive at the destination.  No evidence of the aircraft was found and the five men were presumed killed in action.

              In 2003, an American citizen in Burma reported to U.S. officials at the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) that he had found aircraft wreckage he believed to be an American C-87 in the mountains 112 miles east of Chabua.  He was detained by Burmese officials when he attempted to leave the country with human remains and artifacts from the site.  The remains and materials were handed over to officials at the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon.  Attempts to excavate the site are being negotiated with the Indian government.

              Meanwhile, JPAC scientists continued the forensic process, analyzing the remains and physical evidence already in hand.

              Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA, which matched that of Sims' sister, in the identification of his remains.

             Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died.  At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 72,000 are unaccounted for from the conflict.

==============================================

Missing WWII Airman Identified
Wed, 20 Apr 2011 08:57:00 -0500
IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 316-11
April 20, 2011

 
Missing WWII Airman Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.  

            U.S. Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. James G. Maynard, of Ellenwood, Ga., will be buried on April 22 at Arlington National Cemetery.  On March 12, 1945, Maynard and five crew members aboard a C-47A Skytrain departed Tanauan Airfield on Leyte, Philippines, on a resupply mission to guerilla troops.  Once cleared for takeoff, there was no further communication between the aircrew and airfield operators.  When the aircraft failed to return, a thorough search of an area ten miles on either side of the intended route was initiated.  No evidence of the aircraft was found and the six men were presumed killed in action.  Their remains were determined to be non-recoverable in 1949.

            In 1989, a Philippine National Police officer contacted U.S. officials regarding a possible World War II-era aircraft crash near Leyte.  Human remains, aircraft parts and artifacts were turned over to the local police, then to U.S. officials at the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC).

              From 1989 to 2009, JPAC sought permission to send teams to the crash site but unrest in the Burauen region precluded on-scene investigations or recovery operations.  Meanwhile, JPAC scientists continued the forensic process, analyzing the remains and physical evidence already in hand.

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA-which matched that of Maynard's cousin-in the identification of his remains.

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 72,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

            For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, call 703-699-1420 or visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 300-11
April 13, 2011


 
Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors. 

            Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Martin P. Murray, 21, of Lowell, Mass., will be buried on April 16 in Marshfield, Mass.  Murray, along with 11 other crew members, took off on Oct. 27, 1943, in their B-24D Liberator from an airfield near Port Moresby, New Guinea.  Allied plans were being formulated to mount an attack on the Japanese redoubt at Rabaul, New Britain.  The crew's assigned area of reconnaissance was the nearby shipping lanes in the Bismarck Sea.  But during their mission, they were radioed to land at a friendly air strip nearby due to poor weather conditions.  The last radio transmission from the crew did not indicate their location.  Multiple search missions in the following weeks did not locate the aircraft.

            Following World War II, the Army Graves Registration Service conducted searches for 43 missing airmen, including Murray, in the area but concluded in June 1949 that all were unrecoverable.

            In August 2003, a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) received information on a crash site from a citizen in Papua New Guinea while it was investigating another case.  The citizen also turned over an identification card from one of the crew members and reported that there were possible human remains at the site of the crash.  Twice in 2004 other JPAC teams attempted to visit the site but were unable to do so due to poor weather and hazardous conditions at the helicopter landing site.  Another team was able to successfully excavate the site from January to March 2007 where they found several identification tags from the B-24D crew as well as human remains. 

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA in the identification of Murray's remains.  

            At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans.  Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict. For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)

On the Web: http://www.defense.gov/releases/
Media Contact: +1 (703) 697-5131/697-5132
Public Contact: http://www.defense.gov/landing/questions.aspx or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1

=================================

Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified
Tue, 12 Apr 2011 15:17:00 -0500


IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 295-11
April 12, 2011


 
Soldier Missing from Korean War Identified
 

            The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

            Army Cpl. John W. Lutz, 21, of Kearny, N.J., will be buried tomorrow at Arlington National Cemetery.  From May 16-20, 1951, Task Force Zebra, a multinational force made up of Dutch, French, and U.S. forces, was attacked and isolated into smaller units.  Lutz, of the 1st Ranger Infantry Company, part of Task Force Zebra, went missing while his unit was attempting to infiltrate enemy lines near Chaun-ni, South Korea, along the Hongcheon River Valley. 

            After the 1953 armistice, surviving POWs said Lutz had been captured by enemy forces on May 19, marched north to a POW camp in Suan County, North Korea, and died of malnutrition in July 1951. 

            Between 1991-94, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of remains believed to contain the remains of 200-400 servicemen.  North Korean documents turned over with one of the boxes indicated the remains inside were exhumed near Suan County.  This location correlates with the corporal's last known location. 

            Analysts from DPMO developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years.  Through interviews with surviving POW eyewitnesses, experts validated circumstances surrounding the soldier's captivity and death, confirming wartime documentation of his loss. 

            Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA ? which matched that of his niece?in the identification of the remains.  

            More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War.  With this accounting, 8,001 service members still remain missing from the conflict.  For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703- 699-1169.

U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)

On the Web: http://www.defense.gov/releases/
Media Contact: +1 (703) 697-5131/697-5132
Public Contact: http://www.defense.gov/landing/questions.aspx or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1

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WWII troop to be buried 68 years later in Texas

By Rhiannon Meyers - Corpus Christi Caller-Times via AP
Posted : Thursday Feb 17, 2011 8:28:56 EST

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas - She doesn’t know the color of his eyes, the sound of his voice or how he fell in love with her mother.

For years, all Charmaine Lake Wade, 67, knew of her father could fit on a scrap of yellowing telegraph paper: “I regret to inform you ... 2nd Lt. Edward J. Lake has been reported missing in action."......

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Remains Of Missing WWII Pilot Recovered

Lt. Dewey Foster's P-47 Thunderbolt Crashed on Papua New Guinea in 1944

POSTED: Tuesday, February 15, 2011
A pilot who disappeared on a bombing escort mission 66 years ago during World War II is finally coming home.
The remains of Lt. Dewey Foster were recently discovered on the Pacific island of Papua New Guinea. ......

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