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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2018

  
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Water Tender 2nd Class Edgar D. Gross U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/6/2018
Seaman 1st Class George E. Naegle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Seaman 1st Class Earl P. Baum U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Seaman 1st Class Joseph K. Maule U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Staff. Sgt. Herbert W. Harms U.S. Army Air Forces 569th Bombardment Squadron, 390th Bombardment Group, 13th Combat Bombardment Wing, 3rd Air Division, 8th Air Force 8/16/1944 Germany 9/4/2018
1st Lt. John D. Crouchley, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 828th Bombardment Squadron, 485th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 6/28/1944 Bulgaria 9/4/2018
Sgt. 1st Class James S. Streetman, Jr. U.S. Army Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/22/1950 South Korea 9/4/2018
Pfc. Alva J. Cremean U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/30/2018
Sgt. Millard Odom U.S. Marine Corps Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 8/30/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Dante S. Tini U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/29/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Myron K. Lehman U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Richard L. Watson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/28/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Carl D. Dorr U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Seaman 1st Ckass Hale McKissack U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Seaman 1st Class Wesley V. Jordan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Fire Controlman 1st Class Edward J. Shelden U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Fireman 1st Class Albert U. Kane U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Fireman 1st Class Bert E. McKeeman U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Archie T. Miles U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Pharmacist's Mate 3rd Class William H. Blancheri U.S. Naval Reserve HQ Company, 2md Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 8/24/2018
Cmdr. James B. Mills U.S. Navy Fighter Squadron Twenty One, USS Coral Sea 9/21/1966 Vietnam 8/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Eugene K. Eberhardt U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/20/2018
Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 8/17/2018
Pvt. WIlliam A. Boegli U.S. Army Company L, 332nd Infantry Regiment, 81st Infantry Division 9/30/1944 Republic of Palau 8/17/2018
Pfc. Morris R. Worrell U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment 9/27/1942 Philippines 8/16/2018
Pfc. George L. Spangenberg U.S. Army Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr. US. Army Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/12/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Leo J. Duquette U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/11/1950 South Korea 8/8/2018
Aviation Chief Ordnanceman Otis E. Ingram U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 8/8/2018
Pfc. John A. Taylor U.S. Army Company C, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 8/7/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Wilbur C. Barrett U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/2/2018
Pfc. Leslie E. Shankles U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 10/14/1944 Germany 7/30/2018
Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson U.S. Army Air Forces 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group 12/23/1944 Austria 7/27/2018
Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/26/2018
Pfc. Merton R. Riser U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/26/2018
1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell U.S. Army Air Forces 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force 1/27/1944 France 7/25/2018
2nd Lt. Martin F. O'Callaghan, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 96th Fighter Squadron, 82nd Fighter Group 2/14/1945 Slovenia 7/24/2018
Pvt. John B. Cummings U.S. Army Company A, 276th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division 12/31/1944 France 7/23/2018
Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 7/23/2018
Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/23/2018
Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/20/2018
Cpl. Albert E. Mills U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 7/25/1950 South Korea 7/17/2018
Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn U.S. Army Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 4/30/1951 North Korea 7/16/2018
Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 7/13/2018
Col. Frederic M. Mellor U.S. Air Force Reserve 30th Tactical Squadron/ 15th Tactical Recon Forces 8/13/1965 Vietnam 7/13/2018
Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/20/1950 South Korea 7/12/2018
Pfc. Joe S. Elmore U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 7/5/2018
Pfc. Willard Jenkins U.S. Army Company C, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division 9/20/1944 The Netherlands 7/5/2018
Pvt. Donald E. Brown U.S. Army Company A, 745th Tank Battalion 7/28/1944 France 6/29/2018
2nd Lt. Hulen A. Leinweber U.S. Army Air Forces 40th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group 6/10/1945 Philippines 6/29/2018
Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/28/2018
Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty-One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 6/28/2018
Pfc. Roger Gonzales U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/26/2018
Sgt. James K. Park U.S. Army Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division 11/23/1944 Germany 6/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr. U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Pfc. Robert K. Holmes U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/12/2018
Fireman 1st Class Lewis F. Tindall U.S. Naval Reserve USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/6/2018
Pfc. Paul D. Gilman U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/5/2018
Cpl. Morris Meshulam U.S. Army Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Master Sgt. Carl H. Lindquist U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/4/2018
Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran U.S. Army Air Forces 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 2/25/1941 Slovenia 5/31/2018
Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 5/31/2018
Lt. Cmdr. Larry R. Kilpatrick U.S. Naval Reserve Attack Squadron One Hundred Five (VA-105) 6/18/1972 Vietnam 5/18/2018
Sgt. John W. Hall U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battlion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 5/16/2018
Ensign Harold P. DeMoss U.S. Naval Reserve Fighting Squadron 100 (VF-100) 6/23/1945 O'ahu Hawaii 5/11/2018
Cpl. DeMaret M. Kirtley U.S. Army Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 5/11/2018
Seaman 2nd Class William V. Campbell U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941   5/10/2018
Sgt. Melvin C. Anderson U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Cpl. Joseph Akers U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Shopfitter 3rd Class John M. Donald U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/8/2018
Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2018
Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/3/2018
Pfc. William F. Cavin U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 5/2/2018
Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/11/1945 Germany 4/27/2018
Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 4/27/2018
Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris U.S. Army Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 11/28/1944 Germany 4/26/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum U.S. Army Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/24/2018
Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/23/2018
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2018
Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte U.S. Army Air Forces 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force 8/1/1943 Romania 4/16/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/13/2018
Pfc. John H. Walker U.S. Arny Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry DIvision 11/24/1944 Germany 4/13/2018
Gunners Mate 3rd Class Marvin B. Adkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/11/2018
Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/10/2018
Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/9/2018
Sgt. Eugene W. Yost U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 9/3/1950 South Korea 4/9/2018
Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser U.S. Marine Corps Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 4/6/2018
Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan U.S. Army Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 4/3/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews U.S. Army Air Forces 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force 5/29/1943 France 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/26/2018
Capt. George Van Vleet U.S. Army Air Forces 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group 1/21/1944 Tarawa 3/22/2018
Sgt. Donald L. Baker U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/20/2018
Col. Peter J. Stewart U.S. Air Force Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing 3/15/1966 Vietnam 3/19/2018
Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/16/2018
Cpl. James I. Jubb U.S. Army Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/10/1950 South Korea 3/14/2018
Sgt. Julius E. McKinney U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 3/14/2018
Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz U.S. Army Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 9/28/1944 Netherlands 3/14/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2018
1st Lt. William W. Shank U.S. Army Air Forces 338th Fighter Squadron 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force 11/13/1943 Germany 3/6/2018
Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 5/30/1945 Japan 2/28/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 2/20/2018
Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile U.S. Army Comapny E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/20/2018
Pfc. Joe Lukie U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 2/16/2018
Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 2/14/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/13/2018
Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/8/2018
Pfc. David Baker U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/8/2018
Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 2/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Pfc. Jack H. Krieger U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/31/2018
Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/31/2018
Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/26/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon U.S. Army Gompany G, 8th Cavalry Regiment 9/5/1950 South Korea 1/19/2018
Pfc. Lamar E. Newman U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/27/1950 North Korea 1/19/2018
1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford U.S. Army Air Forces 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 12/17/1944 Croatia 1/19/2018
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018
Col. Edgar F. Davis U.S. Air Force 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing 9/17/1968 Laos 12/30/2017

List posted 09/01/18

 
Some names in articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" yet when published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.

 
09/16/18
 
So far, researchers with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency have identified the remains of nearly 200 servicemen who died in the surprise ...
 
When Ann Mills-Griffiths sent out her regular National League of POW/MIA Families newsletter this month, she included an announcement that Navy ...
https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2018/09/15/harold-demoss-navy-wwii-after-70-years-fallen-soldier-finally-returns-home-nashville/1221865002/


After 70 years, a fallen soldier finally home

Anita Wadhwani

Nashville Tennessean USA TODAY NETWORK - TENNESSEE
 

At exactly 9:51 a.m. the Delta Airlines flight carrying the remains of the late WWII fighter pilot, Harold DeMoss, touched the ground, draped in an American flag and ushered off the tarmac into a waiting hearse by six Navy personnel wearing their dress whites.

It has been more than 70 years since the 21-year-old Navy Ensign — who left Nashville to join the Navy as a teen, never to return — crashed his plane in a remote outcrop on the Hawaiian island of Oahu....

Yet for all those years, DeMoss’s remains have lain where his plane went down on American soil — just 40 miles from the offices of the Pentagon agency charged with retrieving the remains of all fallen soldiers.

The failures of the agency — now called Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency — to bring home some 83,000 fallen soldiers from wars past has devastated thousands of families and drawn withering criticism from Congress....

Sept. 15, 1993: Kathy Borah Duez of LeRoy and other POW-MIA activists will move their protest and month-long fast to Washington. Her brother was shot down over Laos and may be a prisoner in Vietnam. They are upset at President Clinton’s lifting of the trade embargo against Vietnam.

09/15/18
 
A full military memorial service will be held for Master Sergeant Leonard Kelsey Chinn at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Methodist Church in ...
 
15, 1993: Kathy Borah Duez of LeRoy and other POW-MIA activists will move their protest and month-long fast to Washington. Her brother was shot ...
 
... had been identified through an intricate sequence of DNA and anthropological analyses completed by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency identified the sailor Tuesday as Navy Seaman 1st Class James W. Holzhauer, 23. No hometown was listed ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 September, 2018 09:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Indiana Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Morris Meshulam, accounted for on June 4, will be buried September

23 in his hometown.

 

Meshulam, 19, of Indianapolis, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His nephew, Sam Goldstein, is available for interviews at (317) 850-0726.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Meshulam on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

 

In late November 1950, Meshulam was a member of Battery D, 82nd

Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons,) 2nd Infantry

Division.  The Division suffered heavy losses to units of the Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) between the towns of Kunu-ri and Sunchon,

North Korea.  Meshulam was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950. 

 

In February 1951, a prisoner of war returned by the CPVF reported that

Meshulam died of cold weather injuries in early January 1951, but could not

give a location to where Meshulam's remains were located.

 

In July 1951, a Korean farmer led a U.S. Army recovery team to a grave in a

field that contained the remains of a U.S. Soldier.  The recovered remains

were sent to the Tanggok United Nations Memorial Cemetery for possible

identification.  The remains, designated Unknown X-1596 were declared

unidentifiable and buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific,

known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In June 2016, DPAA disinterred Unknown X-1596 from the Punchbowl and sent

the remains to the lab for identification.

 

To identify Meshulam's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Meshulam's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Meshulam's personnel profile can be found at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000009cBfvEAE

 

From: Bill Fortier <bfortier@usamedia.tv>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 7:40 am
Subject: PLEASE PASS INFO...CA Marine Accounted For From KOREAN WAR To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 
CALIFORNIA MARINE CORPS PFC. ROGER GONZALES TO BE BURIED ON Friday,SEP 21, 2018,
 “NATIONAL POW/MIA RECOGNITION DAY” IN RANCHO PALOS VERDES, CA

 
Please pass the word to groups or individuals in the area who might be interested in showing support
for a fallen warrior from the Korean War who has been returned home for burial.

 

 
MARINE CORPS PRIVATE FIRST CLASS ROGER GONZALES 

 
Service Location:
 
MEMORIAL DAY SITE

Service Time:
 
Friday Sep 21 2018 (National POW/MIA Recognition Day)
10:00 AM 

Concludes At:
 
Green Hills Memorial Park
27501 South Western Avenue
Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 
https://greenhillsmemorial.com/service-details/?sid=40739

 

Phone: 310-521-4333

 
Section: Vista Grande
Lot: 443
 
Grave: C

 
Best to all,

 
Bill
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 September, 2018 09:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Marine Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales, accounted for on June 4, will be buried

September 21 in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.

 

Gonzales, 20, of San Pedro, California, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His sister, Erminia Salceda, is available for interviews at 310-833-0592.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Gonzales on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, Gonzales was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion,

7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division.  The U.S. X Corps began earnest

operations in the northeast of the Korean Peninsula against enemy units of

the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPFV), which were thought to be

soldiers of the Korean People's Army (KPA).  The X Corps began its

offensive, spearheaded by the 1st Marine Division and the U.S. Army's 31st

Regimental Combat Team, in the area of the Chosin Reservoir.  On Nov. 27,

1950, Gonzales' unit moved northwest from Hagru-ri to Fox Hill at the

Toktong Pass.  In the early hours of November 28, the CPVF attacked and

Gonzales' company sustained heavy casualties.  Gonzales was reported to have

been killed in action on Nov. 29, 1950, and was buried at the base of Fox

Hill.

 

On Sept. 10, 1954, the KPA returned a shipment of 25 sets of remains that

had reportedly been recovered from the west side of the Chosin Reservoir.

The remains were shipped to the Central Identification Unit Kokura in Japan,

for identification.  One set of remains, designated X-15010 was declared

unidentifiable and was interred as an "Unknown" in the National Memorial

Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In June 2016, after further analysis of historical and biological

information relating to X-15010 DPAA disinterred the unknown X-file from the

Punchbowl and sent the remains to the lab for identification.

 

To identify Gonzales' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), DNA analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

material and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Gonzales' name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Gonzales' personal profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000001ZlGYEA0

 


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Kansas POW/MIA
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2018 20:57:46 -0400
From: Ray Calore <rayjcee@aol.com>
To: info@pownetwork.org


 
From Ray Calore:

 
Hi Mary!  I put together some info and pics to update you on what's been happening in Kansas on POW/MIA activities.  First thing is that our past SEVEN governors have signed a POW/MIA Recognition for the state, beginning in the late 1980's:

 
Gov. Mike Hayden -- 1987-91
Gov. Joan Finney ---  1991-95
Gov. Bill Graves -----  1995-2003
Gov. Kathleen Sebelius -- 2003-2009
Gov. Mark Parkinson ----- 2009-2011
Gov. Sam Brownback ---- 2011-2018
Gov. Jeff Colyer -- 2018 to present.

 
That's each year for each governor since 1988.

 
Notice that the current proclamation, which was signed on Aug. 24, 2018 (picture attached),  designates Kansas POW/MIA Recognition WEEK along with National POW/MIA Day.  It's been that way since the beginning, and I update the proclamation every year. There might be other states that do that, but I don't know. 

 
For each signing ceremony, they allow me to invite up to ten other folks to attend. (I usually go over by a few so I can include as many organizations as possible.)  Some of the photos are attached.  Not many.

 
There's a lot more, as you can imagine.  Just want to make sure our state gets its due.  And we all thank you for a lot of your inspiration and work.

 
That's all for now, Mary.  Keep in touch !

 
-- Ray (913) 787-0226

 

09/13/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday it had identified the remains of the young man from Monona. Since the announcement ..
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Bennett's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the cemetery. A rosette will be placed next ...
 
A POW/MIA convocation will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday in the GSW Storm Dome. The public is invited to this free program, where Camp ...
 
 
... in November 1943 on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 September, 2018 09:05
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Ohio Sailor Accounted For From USS Oklahoma To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders, accounted for on March 26, will

be buried September 19 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu.

 

Sanders, 38, of Lima, Ohio, was killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma

in World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Sanders on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Sanders was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Sanders. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Sanders.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for identification.

 

To identify Sanders' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, anthropological analysis, which matched his records,

along with circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,823 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Sanders' name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Sanders' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0gEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 September, 2018 09:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Idaho Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, accounted for on July 12, will be buried

September 19 in Silver Creek, Nebraska.

 

Chinn, 34, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His son, Rodney Chinn, of Columbus, Nebraska, is available for interviews at

(402) 563-4322.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Chinn on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent

Chinese attacks in North Korea.  Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy

forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war

camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea. 

 

Several repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Chinn died April

5, 1941 in Camp 5.

 

On Dec. 14, 1993, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 33 boxes of remains of

servicemen who had died during the Korean War. North Korean documents,

turned over with some of the boxes, indicated that some of the remains were

recovered from the vicinity where POWs from Chinn's unit were believed to

have died.

 

To identify Chinn's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis, and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Chinn's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004lh3EAA

 
09/11/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Pfc. Leonard A. Tyma's remains were identified using dental, anthropological and chest radiograph ...
 
5, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Gross was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor ...
 
Gross was one of 429 men killed on board the ship when it capsized, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). Gross' remains ...
 
Bishop Bill Would Give Full Arlington Privileges To Enlisted POW and ... National League of POW/ MIA Families, Special Operations Association, ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency identified the sailor in a news release Tuesday as 23-year-old Navy Seaman 1st Class James W.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday that the remains of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood have been ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 11:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Oklahoma Soldier Accounted-For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Tech. Sgt. Robert J. Fitzgerrell.  Fitzgerrell,

32, born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was accounted for on September 4.

 

In January 1945, Fitzgerrell was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 311th

Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division.  On Jan. 30, 1945, while engaged

in an attack against enemy forces near Huppenbroich, Germany, Fitzgerrell

stepped on an anti-personnel mine and was killed.  His remains were not

identified by American forces after the battle.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command traveled to

Huppenbroich and extensively searched the Hürtgen Forest, to locate

Fitzgerrell’s remains.  Unable to make a correlation with any remains found

in the area, he was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 15, 1951. 

 

In 2016, a historian from DPAA analyzed documentation of X-6998 Neuville, an

unidentified set of remains recovered from a shallow burial near

Huppenbroich in 1947.  The remains, unable to be identified in 1947, were

subsequently interred at Neuville, present-day Ardennes American Cemetery in

Belgium. 

 

Based upon the original recovery location and evidence from the personal

effects associated with X-6998, the DPAA historian determined that there was

a possible association between the remains and Fitzgerrell.  Following a

comparison of the X-6998 skeletal documentation to Fitzgerrell’s physical

characteristics, a DPAA anthropologist concurred, and DPAA officials

recommended disinterment.  In June 2017, the Department of Defense and

American Battle Monuments Commission disinterred X-6998 and accessioned the

remains to the laboratory for identification

 

To identify Fitzgerrell’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, as well as anthropological analysis, and circumstantial

and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Fitzgerrell’s name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Hombourg,

Belgium, an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the other

MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown, Fitzgerrell’s grave was

meticulously cared for by ABMC for 70 years.  A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 08:36
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Washington USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Sir/Ma'am,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Radioman 3rd Class Bruce H. Ellison.  Ellison,

21, born in Poulsbo, Washington, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ellison was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Ellison. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Ellison.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Ellison's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Ellison's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Ellison's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeLEEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 08:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class James W. Holzhauer.  Holzhauer,

23, of Virginia, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Holzhauer was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma,

which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Holzhauer. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Holzhauer.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Holzhauer's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Holzhauer's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Holzhauer's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeLqEAK

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject:   FW: Full Military Honors Act of 2018 H.R. 6734
Date:   Tue, 11 Sep 2018 08:57:09 -0400
From:   moehog@verizon.net
To:   moehog@verizon.net

 

Good Tuesday Morning!

 

We believe that most of us can/will agree with the statement ‘all men are created equal’ but we also understand that in life, order is necessary to avoid chaos. In the Armed Services and specifically in a combat situation this ‘order’ is a must and its use is a proven life saver. But when should ‘rank/order’ cease to be a measurement of ones life’s accomplishments?

 

Are you aware of the fact that a Sargent or a Private First Class who is captured by the enemy, held against his/her will (POW), repatriated and upon their death is not entitled to the same funeral service that an Officer who had also been a POW? The Officer would be entitled to ‘Full Military Honors’ Funeral Service while the Enlisted person would be entitled to a ‘Funeral Service’.

 

Personally, I agree with Representative Sam Johnson (TX), who was a Prisoner of War (16 April 1966-12 February 1973). His statement in a recent press release announcing the introduction of ‘Full Military Honors Act of 2018’ is copied  in part below:

 

“During my time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton, many of my fellow POWs and I were isolated in cramped cells,” said Rep. Johnson. “We spent months in leg irons, years in leg stocks, and endured extreme starvation and torture. My fellow POWs who served honorably demonstrated the utmost patriotism, but not all of them were eligible for full military honors at their burial, simply due to their rank. I believe this is wrong. ANY veteran who served honorably as a Prisoner of War or whose actions earned them the Medal of Honor has already demonstrated extraordinary dedication to defending Freedom. In return, they deserve to have the country they fought for bestow full military honors if they are eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

If you agree with Representative Johnson thoughts we hope you will contact your Representative  and request they become a Co-Sponsor on this Act, H.R. 6734.

Not sure how to get in touch with your Representative – try this link - https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative

This Bill was brought to the Floor on 7 September and referred to the House Committee on Armed Services - https://armedservices.house.gov/about/members. Is your Representative on this Committee?

 

Time is of the essence! Only a few months until this Congressional session ends. Pro-Active is best.

Being a part of the Solution can be very rewarding!

 

If we can be of any help – just contact us via this email – moehog@verizon.net or our cell – 407 448 1181

 

This is a copy of the Media Release from Rep. Bishop’s Office:


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Annalyse Beaver

Sep 10, 2018

202-805-5619

 


 

  Reps. Bishop, Johnson and Walz Introduce Full Military Honors Act  

WASHINGTON – Congressmen Mike Bishop (MI-08), Sam Johnson (TX-03), and House Veterans’ Affairs Committee Ranking Member Tim Walz (MN-01) today announced the introduction of the bipartisan Full Military Honors Act of 2018 (H.R. 6734) to allow enlisted Medal of Honor recipients and Prisoners of War (POW) who are eligible for burial at Arlington National Cemetery to receive a full military honors burial, which includes an escort platoon, a military band, and a caisson (horse drawn casket) if available. Currently, full military honors are reserved for commissioned officers, warrant officers, and senior non-commissioned officers.

“America’s POWs and Medal of Honor recipients have sacrificed immeasurably in service to the United States – regardless of their rank. So I was shocked to find out that earlier this year a former POW from Michigan, Army Pvt. 1st Class Robert Fletcher was denied a full honors burial at Arlington National Cemetery based solely on his enlisted rank,” said Rep. Bishop. “This has been an issue for too long, and my legislation will ensure those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty are provided the full military honors they have earned for their end of life ceremonies.”

“During my time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton, many of my fellow POWs and I were isolated in cramped cells,” said Rep. Johnson. “We spent months in leg irons, years in leg stocks, and endured extreme starvation and torture. My fellow POWs who served honorably demonstrated the utmost patriotism, but not all of them were eligible for full military honors at their burial, simply due to their rank. I believe this is wrong. ANY veteran who served honorably as a Prisoner of War or whose actions earned them the Medal of Honor has already demonstrated extraordinary dedication to defending Freedom. In return, they deserve to have the country they fought for bestow full military honors if they are eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. I am grateful for Rep. Mike Bishop’s leadership on this issue, and I’m proud to join him in standing up for the service and sacrifice of our Great Nation’s veterans.”  

“Medal of Honor recipients and POWs have earned and deserve nothing less than full military honors,” said Rep. Walz. “As a retired enlisted soldier of 24 years, I’m proud to join in introducing the Full Military Honors Act. To help ensure we honor the sacrifices these heroes and their families have made for our country, we must pass it without delay.”

Congressman Sam Johnson, a 29-year U.S. Air Force veteran, flew combat missions in both the Korean and Vietnam Wars. On the 25th combat mission of his second tour in Vietnam, Johnson was shot down over North Vietnam and held as a POW for nearly seven years in the “Hanoi Hilton.” While there, his captors labeled him a “diehard” resistor and moved him into solitary confinement in “Alcatraz,” along with ten other POWs including U.S. Senator Jeremiah Denton and Vice Presidential candidate Jim Stockdale.

Congressman Tim Walz, a 24-year veteran of the Army National Guard, is the Ranking Member of the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs and serves on the US-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs. Walz is the highest ranking enlisted soldier ever to serve in Congress.

The Full Military Honors Act of 2018 is endorsed by the American Legion, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Military Officers Association of America, National League of POW/ MIA Families, Special Operations Association, Special Forces Association, and American Fallen Warriors Memorial Foundation. To read letters in support of H.R. 6734, click HERE.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 September, 2018 10:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Fireman 3rd Class Robert J. Bennett.  Bennett,

18, born in Monona, Iowa, was accounted for on August 13.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Bennett was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Bennett. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Bennett.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Bennett's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Bennett's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.


Bennett's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKKEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 10 September, 2018 10:26

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Arkansas USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been identified as those of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood.

Lockwood, 21, born in Smithton, Arkansas, was accounted for on July 3.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Lockwood was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Lockwood. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Lockwood.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

 

To identify Lockwood's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Lockwood's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Lockwood's personnel profile can be viewed at https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe00EAC

09/10/18

 
What happens to the POW/MIA monument located at the O'Hare oasis when workers tear down the glass pavilion overhanging the Tri-State Tollway?

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says remains of Navy Reserve Ensign Harold P. DeMoss were accounted for in May and identified through ...

 

 
In coming weeks, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is expected to announce the first two identifications from 55 sets of remains turned over ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday that the remains of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood have been ...
 
... was shot down on a mission to Zeitz, Germany on Aug. 16, 1944. Eight of nine crewmembers bailed out safely and were held as prisoners of war.
 
"The IDs will be made officially in the next couple of days," said John Byrd, the director of scientific analysis at the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
... been identified, and the U.S. military will be notifying their families within days, directors for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday.
 
... members among the 55 boxes returned by North Korea this summer, officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accountability Agency said Monday.
09/09/18
 
The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified. The Defense ...
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified.
09/08/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Friday the remains of Water Tender 2nd Class Edgar D. Gross of Athens have been positive ...
09/07/18
 
 
So it does appear that these were all buried together at one point in time," says Greg Berg from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
 
To identify his remains, scientists from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used material and circumstantial evidence. He will be laid to rest in ...
 
The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Sept. 4 that 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk's remains were identified last month using DNA ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Illinois USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class Earl P. Baum.  Baum, 19, born

in Chicago, was accounted for on August 23.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Baum was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Baum. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Baum.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Baum's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72, 866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Baum's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Baum's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKHEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Nebraska USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class Joseph K. Maule.  Maule, 18,

born in Bloomfield, Nebraska, was accounted for on August 8.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Maule was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Maule. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Maule.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Maule's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Maule's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

 

Maule's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe08EAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 13:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Georgia Soldier Accounted For From The Korean War

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been

identified as those of Army Sgt. 1st Class James S. Streetman, Jr.

Streetman, 23, born in Columbus, Georgia, was accounted for on August 31.

 

In July 1950, Streetman was a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment,

24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th ID's Kum

River Line against the Korean People's Army (KPA), near the town of Taejon,

South Korea. The KPA outmaneuvered and overwhelmed Streetman's regiment,

forcing units into a fighting withdrawal through enemy lines. Streetman was

initially reported to have been killed in action on Aug. 14, 1950, however

historical records determined he had been killed July 22, 1950.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Services (AGRS) processed

remains from South Korean battlefields for possible identification. Remains

that could not be identified were buried as "Unknowns" in the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

Because no remains could be associated with Streetman, he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

On Oct. 6, 1950, unidentified remains recovered from north of Taejon

designated as Unknown X-162, were interred by the U.S. Army in the former

American Cemetery No. 1, renamed to United States Military Cemetery Taejon.

After attempts to identify the remains were unsuccessful, Unknown X-162 were

declared unidentifiable and were subsequently interred at the National

Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In 2017, ten sets of remains were disinterred from NMCP, including Unknown

X-162, and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Streetman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,686 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams. Streetman's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu along with the others who are missing

from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.                                                                   

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class George E. Naegle.  Nagle, 22,

born in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Naegle was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Naegle. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Naegle.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Naegle's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Naegle's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Naegle's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0KEAS

 

09/06/18
 
“All they have to do is furnish the table.” The AMVETS will host a formal MIA/POW ceremony at the post, 423 Trenton Ave., at about 5 p.m. Sept. 21.
 
Being left with so many unanswered questions, the suffering continues for America's POW and MIA families long after a loved one's fate has been ...
 
 
There are 190 service members who remain unaccounted for from North Carolina alone, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Wednesday that Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John D. Crouchley Jr. of Providence was identified ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency exhumed the remains of Navy Seaman 1st Class George Naegle, of La Crosse, from the National ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 September, 2018 14:47
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Illinois Airman Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Herbert W. Harms.  Harms,

28, born in Rutland, Illinois, was accounted for on August 31.

 

In August 1944, Harms served as a B-17 tail gunner with the 569th

Bombardment Squadron, 390th Bombardment Group, 13th Combat Bombardment Wing,

3rd Air Division, 8th Air Force.  On Aug. 16, 1944, Harms' aircraft was

struck by anti-aircraft artillery during a bombardment mission to Zeitz,

Germany.  The aircraft crashed just outside the village of Cauerwitz,

Germany.  Eight of the nine crewmembers of the "Dottie III/Green Banana"

safely bailed out of the aircraft, were captured and held as prisoners of

war before being returned to duty.  None of the surviving crewmembers

reported seeing Harms leave the aircraft, though most believed he jumped

before the crash.  A German report listed Harms as having died in the crash.

 

In June 1947, American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) personnel

disinterred the remains of one unknown American from a corner of the

civilian cemetery in Thierbach, Germany.  According to the Narrative of

Investigation, the AGRC team had learned from the cemetery caretaker that a

plane had crashed and local residents had found remains.  Following the

exhumation, the remains, which could not be identified, were buried at U.S.

Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium, as X-5882 Neuville.  In

1948, the remains were disinterred for reprocessing, and were again declared

unidentifiable.  They were subsequently reburied.

 

In September 1947, an AGRC team visited Cauerwitz, Saxony-Anhalt to

investigate Harms' loss.  The team examined the crash site with the local

Burgermeister (mayor) who told investigators that the aircraft had come from

the direction of Zeitz and some crewmembers parachuted from the aircraft.

The team did not learn about any burials of American casualties in nearby

towns.  The AGRC compared previously collected X-file remains to Harms'

medical records, but a positive match could not be made.  Based on a lack of

information regarding the location of Harms' remains, he was declared

non-recoverable on May 10, 1950.

 

In 2016, based on a request from independent researcher Mr. Christopher

Unitt, a DPAA historian reviewed documents of remains recovered from the

area near Thierbach, including X-5882 Neuville.  Historical documents

indicated that Harms was likely associated with X-5882.

 

Based on the historical analysis, X-5882 was recommended for disinterment.

On Sept. 5, 2017, a team from U.S. Army Regional Mortuary-Europe/Africa

exhumed the remains from Neuville American Cemetery and accessioned the

remains to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Harms' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the German government, U.S. Army Regional Mortuary

Europe/Africa, the American Battle Monuments Commission and Mr. Christopher

Unitt for their partnerships in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Harms' name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium, along with the others

missing from WWII.  Although interred as an unknown, Harms' grave was

meticulously cared-for for more than 70 years by ABMC.  A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 September, 2018 14:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Rhode Island Airman Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John D. Crouchley, Jr.

Crouchley, 26, born in Providence, Rhode Island, was accounted for on August

31.

 

In June 1944, Crouchley served as a pilot with the 828th Bombardment

Squadron, 485th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force.  On June 28, 1944,

Crouchley was lost when his B-24H aircraft was shot down and crashed during

a combat mission over Romania.  The nine crewmembers of aircraft parachuted

safely, were captured as prisoners of war in Belgium, and subsequently

returned to duty.  Only Crouchley remained unaccounted for.  Because the

crash occurred in enemy territory, American personnel were not able to

conduct an immediate search, and Bulgaria provided no evidence that his

remains were recovered or buried.  Based on no further information of his

status, he was declared deceased as of June 29, 1945.

 

Following the close of hostilities, the American Graves Registration Command

(AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who

were killed in battle.  Investigators compared Crouchley's medical

information to unidentified remains recovered in Bulgaria, but a positive

match could not be made.  On July 2, 1948, Crouchley's remains were declared

non-recoverable.

 

In 2010, an investigation team of analysts from the Defense POW/Missing

Personnel Office and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (both predecessors

of DPAA) conducted a site survey of the alleged crash site and interviewed

potential witnesses.  The site was consistent with the historical loss

records, as well as eyewitness accounts.  The team recovered weaponry

bearing the serial number that correlated with Crouchley's aircraft.

 

From July to September 2017, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site,

overlooking the village of Churen.  The team recovered possible osseous

remains and material evidence.  The remains were accessioned to the

laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Crouchley's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Col. Stanimir Stanev, Bulgarian Army, Retired and the

Bulgarian Government for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Crouchley's name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Impruenta, Italy, along with others missing

from WWII.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

09/04/18
 
First Lt. Herman L. Falk of Manhattan was just 22 when he died in a North Korean prisoner of war camp, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that Marine Corps Sgt. Millard Odom from Batesville, Arkansas, was officially ...
 
 
The remains of a Marine from Colorado have been identified nearly 80 years after he was killed at Pearl Harbor. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that Pfc. Alva J. Cremean, who served on the U.S.S. Oklahoma, was accounted for as ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 September, 2018 13:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas Marine Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Marine Corps Sgt. Millard Odom.  Odom, 26, born in

Batesville, Arkansas, was accounted for on August 20.

 

In November 1943, Odom was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd

Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff

Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the

Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of

intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were

killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually

annihilated. Odom died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943, during

the first waves of the assault.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a significant victory for the U.S. military because

the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from

which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance

their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island.  Odom was reportedly buried in Cemetery #33. The 604th

Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery

operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Odom's remains were not

identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield

Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947.  By

1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu.

              

On Feb. 27, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-273 from the NMCP, and

sent the remains to the laboratory.

 

To identify Odom's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Odom's name is recorded on the Tablets of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Marine Corps Service

Casualty office at (800) 847-1597.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Odom's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000E0tn7EAB

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 September, 2018 13:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: New York Soldier Accounted For From The Korean War

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been

identified as those of Army 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk.  Falk, 22, of New York,

New York, was accounted for on August 14.

 

In February 1951, Falk was a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment,

2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against

units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an the vicinity of

Changbong-ni, South Korea.  Falk, and half of his platoon, were reported

missing in action on Feb. 12, 1951.

 

Following the war, returning American prisoners of war reported that Falk

died in either April or  May of 1951, while being held as a prisoner of war

at the Suan Bean Camp in North Korea.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the

remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who died during the war. First

Lieutenant Falk's remains were included in this turnover

 

To identify Falk's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA remains fully prepared to resume recovery operations in the Democratic

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,686 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Falk's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Falk's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000wynYBEAY

 


 
The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk's remains were identified last month using ...
09/01/18
Schanberg investigated the work of the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs in 1991 and 1992, of which McCain was a member. In a lengthy ...

 
American officials made the claim during a May meeting of the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs, and experts say it could undermine the ...

 
08/31/18
 
 
Mueller died on May 3, 1951, unable to march farther north. On Aug. 4, 2017, Mueller's stepbrother Greg got a call from the POW/MIA Identification Lab ...
 
Presumed dead, the location of his body remained a mystery until the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency positively identified Duran's remains in ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 August, 2018 11:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Minnesota USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Radioman 3rd Class Dante S. Tini.  Tini,19, born

in Virginia, Minnesota, was accounted for on August 13.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tini was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Tini. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Tini.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Tini's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Tini's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Tini's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XgBlEAK

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 August, 2018 13:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: South Dakota USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 2nd Class Myron K. Lehman.  Lehman, 20,

born in Gann Valley, South Dakota, was accounted for on August 9.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Lehman was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Lehman. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Lehman.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Lehman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Lehman's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Lehman's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XdzyEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 August, 2018 13:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of  Navy Seaman 1st Class Richard L. Watson,  Watson,

20, born in Crossett, Arkansas, was accounted for on August 14.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Watson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Watson.  

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Watson.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Watson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Watson's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Watson's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xg9VEAS

 

08/29/18
 
 
As it turns out, those addresses, and corresponding Internet links, all are listed on a single website maintained by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
BAKERSFIELD, California (KBAK/KBFX) — Military officials with The Department of Defense's POW/MIA agency identified the remains of a Bakersfield ...

moe note; although this is a “Blast from the Past” from POW Network please note the original published date is August 2016.

Please remember, that just because a sitting President (Eisenhower, Nixon) say there are NO LIVE POWs being held against their Will – Does NOT make it so. Just because Communist Country Leadership says they have NO Americans in their possession after the signing of the peace treaty/armistice – Does NOT make it so.

In my opinion, they were 20,000 plus left behind at the end of WW II, 1,000 plus left behind after we pulled out of Korea and 300 plus left behind in Indochina after our departure in 1973

Remember the Mission – NOT FORGOTTEN – until they come home or are accounted for.

 

From: POW Network <info@pownetwork.org>
Sent: 24 August, 2018 20:40
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: Blast from the past


https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1657537/kim-jong-un-is-still-holding-elderly-british-and-american-prisoners-of-war-in-death-camps-sixty-years-after-korean-war-experts-claim/

CAGED IN KOREA 

Kim Jong-Un is still holding elderly British and American prisoners of war in death camps SIXTY years after Korean War, experts claim

CIA documents also suggest an unknown number of Western soldiers were abandoned at the end of the war

23rd August 2016,

Updated: 23rd August 2016,

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 11:42
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Schade, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Capt. Lester A. Schade, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on July 26.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614359/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-schade-l/

 

In April 1942, Schade, a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 4th Marine

Regiment, when he was captured by enemy forces and held as a prisoner of war

in the Philippine Islands. On Dec. 14, 1944, more than 1,600 Allied

prisoners were loaded aboard a Japanese transport en route to Japan. The in 1942

ship was attacked by American carrier planes, killing a number of American

prisoners. Survivors were transported aboard two other ships to Formosa,

present day Taiwan, where they were loaded onto another ship, Enoura Maru,

which was also attacked by American carrier planes. According to records

Schade was aboard the Enoura Maru when it was attacked Jan. 9, 1945, and was

listed as missing, presumed dead as a result of the incident.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Schade's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American

Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in the Philippines,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Schade's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000OlXjsEAF

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 10:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Tech Sgt Carlsen, USMC, Tarawa

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Tech Sgt. Harry A. Carlsen, killed during World War II,

was accounted for on June 4, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614262/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-carlsen-h/

 

In November 1943, Carlsen was assigned to Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor

Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Carlsen died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943, during the first waves of the assault.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., and the Department of Veterans

Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Carlsen's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Carlsen's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000QrroEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 08:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Jordan, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wesley V. Jordan, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 8, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614133/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-jordan-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Jordan was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Jordan.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Jordan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Jordan's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XdzgEAC

 

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 09:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Shelden, E.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fire Controlman Edward J. Shelden, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614161/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-shelden-e/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Shelden was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Shelden.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Shelden's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Shelden's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0jEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 07:32
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (McKissack, H.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Hale McKissack, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614083/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mckissack-h/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, McKissack was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including McKissack.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

McKissack's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

McKissack's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeJKEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 07:31
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Dorr, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Carl D. Dorr, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 25, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614081/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-dorr-c/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Dorr was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Dorr.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Dorr's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Dorr's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeL6EAK

 

08/27/18
 

 
On Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018, service members carried what is believed to be remains of U.S. soldiers from the Korean War. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh).
 
 
... missing in action to call the appropriate Service Casualty Office (operating within the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency): Army (800-892-2490), ...
 
A large American Flag and an equally large POW/MIA flag stand tall, far above the rooftop of Ron Elliot's Marshallton-area home. Elliot is a Vietnam ...
 
In 2015, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, armed with new technology, renewed efforts to identify those lost at Pearl Harbor. Petty Officer ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 August, 2018 11:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Eberhardt, E.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Eugene K. Eberhardt, killed during the

attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 3,

2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1610366/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-eberhardt-e/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Eberhardt was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Eberhardt.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Eberhartd's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 21 August, 2018 10:19
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured and Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Williams, K.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams, captured and killed during the Korean War,

was accounted for on August 13.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1607858/

soldie-captured-and-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-williams-k/

 

In late November 1950, Williams was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd

Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700

South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT),

which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was

attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks

continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army

evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had

been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Williams was

reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after he was last seen near the

Chosin Reservoir.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Williams' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Williams' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000aq4djEAA

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 21 August, 2018 10:19
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Boegli, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pvt. William A. Boegli, killed during World War II, was accounted for

on August 14.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1607862/
soldier-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-boegli-w/

 

In September 1944, Boegli was a member of Company L, 332nd Infantry

Regiment, 81st Infantry Division, invading Angaur Island in the Palau Island

chain. After Boegli's regiment successfully captured Red Beach on the

northeastern shore, they pushed westward across the island. On Sept. 30,

1944, Boegli was killed while attempting to lead a group of litter bearers

to evacuate wounded servicemen. His remains were not recovered following the

war.

 

Interment services are pending; a formal notification will be released 7-10

days prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission and the

Manila American Cemetery and Memorial for their partnership in this mission.

 

Boegli's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American

Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an

Unknown, Boegli's grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by

the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 August, 2018 10:57
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Miles, A.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Archie T. Miles, killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1613202/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-miles-a/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Miles was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Miles.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Miles' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Miles' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0FEAS

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 27 August, 2018 10:58

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Blancheri, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Reserve Pharmacist's Mate 3rd Class William H. Blancheri, killed during

World War II, was accounted for on Aug. 14, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1613210/
sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-blancheri-w/

 

In November 1943, Blancheri was a member of Headquarters Company, 2nd

Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Blancheri died on the first day of the battle, Nov.

20, 1943, during the first waves of the assault.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Blancheri's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Blancheri's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XfFJEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 27 August, 2018 10:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (McKeeman, B.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Bert E. McKeeman, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on Aug. 13, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1613199/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-mckeeman-b/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, McKeeman was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including McKeeman.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

McKeeman's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

McKeeman's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0CEAS

 
08/23/18

 
Through research by local researchers there and the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, it was determined in 2016 that the remains beside ...


Nearly 75 years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the100th USS Oklahoma Sailor to be identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), ...
Subject: FW: LIVE American Military who were LEFT Behind
Date: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 13:41:46 -0400
From: moehog@verizon.net
To: moehog@verizon.net


 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8brs7CIxYts&feature=youtu.be

 

Good Wednesday Afternoon Veterans, Patriots and Advocates!

 

The Link above was shared a few days ago – it is from an email sent by Bill Dumas – MIA Family member of Roger Dumas, Korean War POW who never came home! He was Last Known Alive (LKA) in Camp 5.

If you ever asked the question, to yourself or out loud, - “Did We Leave American Military Behind?”- this is a chance to formulate your answer based on rarely published facts.

 

Self-Education is vital to the success of the Accounting Mission.

 

FYI –

Last Known Alive by era;

WW II – 20,000 plus left in the hands of our ALLY – Russia/Stalin

Korea – 1,000 plus – note the film

Vietnam – ‘1205’ report, dtd. Sept. 1972, notes 1205 US military held by North Vietnam – only 591 released by 1 April 1973 – 600 plus unaccounted for, plus unaccounted for in Laos & Cambodia. Total could be 900 plus.

 

Just a reminder – Recovery of LIVE Military personnel does/did not fall under DPAA/DPMO/JPAC  mission  – SecDef, Pentagon, JSOC, State Department & White House as well as Intelligence Agencies are units involved in such action.

 

Until they all come home……….

 

moe

 
08/21/18

 
The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is now examining the remains and doing DNA testing in hopes of identifying troops that have ...
Subject: Korean War POW/MIA Peace Treaty Initiative
Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2018 14:43:57 +0000
From: Bill Dumas <info@billdumas.com>
Reply-To: Bill Dumas <info@billdumas.com>
To: info@pownetwork.org

The Last Chance for Korean War POW/MIAs

Watch the 13-minute video

Sign the Petition

Sign the Petition

View the feature doc, "Missing Presumed Dead"

 
  08/20/18  
 
Editor's note: Michael Dolski is a historian with the Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency. The department requires that he submit ...
 
 
that would provide $10 million for POW/MIA identification. Senators have introduced a slew of other amendments to bill, which leaders have paired ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 20 August, 2018 10:56
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: New Mexico Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, accounted for on May 22, will be

buried August 22 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

 

Duran, 22, of El Rito, New Mexico, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Stanley Evans, of Santa Fe, is available for interviews at (505)

982-3204.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Duran on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In February 1944, Duran was a nose gunner on a B-24H Liberator, assigned to

the 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air

Force.  On February 25, 1944, the final day of Operation Argument, Duran's

aircraft came under attack by German fighters and anti-aircraft fire, while

he was on a bombing mission targeting Regensburg, Germany.  The tail gunner

in another aircraft witnessed a direct hit on Duran's aircraft, which tore

off a section of the right wing.  Nine of the ten crew members were able to

bail from the aircraft before it crashed.  The tail gunner from Duran's

aircraft reported he had last seen Duran alive in the aircraft, but believed

Duran did not bail out.  All nine of Duran's crewmates survived the bail out

and were captured and interrogated in Verona, Italy, where they were told

that one body had been found in the aircraft wreckage.  The crash site was

reported to be located near Ljubljana, Slovenia, an area then under Axis

control.

 

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Service, Mediterranean

Zone, of the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for the remains of U.S.

service personnel in Europe, as part of the global effort to identify and

return them for honored burial.  No remains could be associated with Duran,

and he was declared deceased as of Feb. 25, 1944.

 

In 2006, analysts began research on Duran's loss after receiving information

concerning a B-24 Liberator that had reportedly crashed near the village of

Pokojišče, municipality of Vrhnika, Slovenia.  A team from the Defense

POW/Missing Personnel Office, a predecessor of DPAA, visited the alleged

crash site in 2012 and interviewed residents who reported the remains of an

unidentified Allied airman from that crash site were initially buried along

the side wall of Saint Stephens Church in Pokojišče, and that the grave was

regularly tended to by Mrs. Tončka Dragar, who cordoned it off with stones

and regularly laid flowers on the mound.

 

The team was then shown a headstone erected in 1962 at the back of Saint

Stephens Church, indicating that the unidentified Allied airman, by then

portrayed as an Australian airman, had been reburied together with four

Partisan soldiers, two of whom were also unidentified. 

 

In 2016, with information provided by several private Slovenain researchers,

DPAA concluded that the remains were likely those of Duran.  Because there

was a possibility that the remains were of an Australian, DPAA invited the

collaboration of the Office of Australian War Graves Commission (OAWG) and

Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Directorate of History and Heritage. 

 

Upon concurrence from the OAWG and RAAF, and with the gracious permission of

Father Janez Šiler, the Parish Priest of St. Stephens, the families of the

Partisan soldiers believed to have been buried in the alleged mass grave,

the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs, and Equal

Opportunities, and the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage of

Slovenia, in July 2017 a DPAA recovery team excavated several alleged burial

sites adjacent to the church in Pokojišče, recovering possible osseous

remains. 

 

To identify Duran's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as material and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs,

and Equal Opportunities, the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage

of Slovenia, the residents of Pokojišče, the several private Slovenian

researchers involved, Tončka Dragar, Ambassador Brent Hartley, the Office of

Australian War Graves Commission, and the RAAF Directorate of History and

Heritage for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Duran's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery in Impruneta, Italy, along

with other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to

indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

08/19/18
 


 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Thursday that Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn was assigned to the USS ...
 
This spring, Wade's family learned that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has identified their relative's remains, as well as others of his ...
08/17/18
 

 
... 200 servicemen would be sent back to the U.S. by North Korea, the mayor wrote a letter to the Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

 

 
The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr., 21, of West Greenville died on ...

 

 
The envelope from Hawaii is postmarked Dec. 6, 1941. Inside is the last letter 19-year-old Marine Pfc. Robert Kimball Holmes sent home to his father ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 August, 2018 07:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Captured and Killed During World War II Accounted For (Worrell, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Morris R. Worrell, captured and killed during World War II, was

accounted for on August 13.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1605102/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-worrell-m/

 

On Dec. 8, 1941, Worrell was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st

Infantry Regiment, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands.

Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on

April 9, 1942, and of the Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942. Thousands of

U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner; including many who

were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner

of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan on the island of

Luzon, Philippines. Worrell was among those reported captured after the

surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW

camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the remaining years

of the war.

 

Interment services are pending; a formal notification will be released 7-10

days prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Worrell's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila

American Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will

be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Worrell's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Ll5vEAC.

 

08/16/18

 
However, it wasn't until July 3 that the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency identified Elmore's remains with the help of DNA. Mary Bowlin, Elmore's ...
 
The figure comes from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, a branch of the Department of Defense, and is made up of those missing in action ...
 
 
Gilich is writing the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency at Joint Base Pearl Harbor to let leaders know that 'while there are no surviving Gaude ...
 
 
... many sets of Korean War remains were in 55 boxes handed over by North Korea, officials with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Aug.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Indiana Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, accounted for on Nov. 17,

2017, will be buried August 21 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific in Honolulu.

 

Glenn, 43, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His great niece, Danielle Myers, also of Fort Wayne, is available for

interviews at (260) 615-9076.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Glenn on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Glenn's 43rd birthday, he was assigned to the USS Oklahoma,

which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Glenn. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Glenn.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Glenn's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, along

with circumstantial evidence.  Glenn was the 100th identification made by

DPAA of the USS Oklahoma casualties.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Glenn's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:12
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Spangenberg, G.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. George L. Spangenberg, killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on August 14.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1603758/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-spangenberg-g/

 

In November 1950, Spangenberg was a member of Company E, 8th Cavalry

Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 2,

1950 following a battle in Unsan, North Korea, the days prior.

Spangengberg's name was never included on lists of American Soldiers being

held as prisoners of war by the Korean People's Army (KPA) or the Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF,) and no returned American prisoners of war

had any information on his status.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Spangenberg's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the

Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A

rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Spangenberg's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004o2sEAA

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 August, 2018 07:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Ball, M.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr., killed during the Korean War, was accounted

for on August 14.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1603755/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-ball-m/

 

In July 1950, Ball was a member of Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry

Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North

Korean forces near Choch'iwon, South Korea. Ball could not be accounted-for

and was declared missing in action on July 12, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Ball's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Ball's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000007PrFBEA0

08/15/18
 

 

 

 
Forty-five years after American Prisoners-of-War returned to the U.S. following ... the Director of the Defense for the POW and MIA Accounting Agency....

 
08/14/18
In 1994, a dig by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency) [http://www.dpaa.mil/] uncovered several ...

 

 
Funding for the study was provided by the Army Research Office and the Defense Biometrics and Forensics Office to support the Defense POW/MIA ...

 

 
Ketchum was recently identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Office, and returned home Sunday for burial in Calvary Cemetery, almost 68 ...

 

 
... mission into Wonsan, North Korea, to retrieve the remains and deliver them to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in the United States.

 

 
After the repatriation of the last remains, the US Department of Defense (of which the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency forms a part), along with ...

 
At the meeting Thursday, director of the Defense Pow/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) Kelly McKeague, a retired Air Force major general, told the ...

 

 
Shortly after, he became a P.O.W and died in November of 1942. ... Many people came out to remember his story, including veterans, POW/MIA riders ...
After 75 years a Germantown born Marine has finally returned home to Philadelphia.

Marine Pvt Emil F. Ragucci was given a police escort to the John F. Murray in Flourtown, PA for his full honors burial tomorrow in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 3301 W. Cheltenham Ave., Philadelphia. PA.

https://youtu.be/IIii1Wpd5z8

 
 
Semper fidelis,

Patrick
God Bless America

 
I am writing in regard to the removal of the Bible from the POW/MIA display at F.E. Warren Air Force Base. Four generations of our family have served ...

 

 
Nearly 20 years later, the remains were disinterred and transported to The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which seeks to ...

 

 
Forensic expert Dr. Timothy McMahon is working with the Defense POW/MIA accounting agency or D-P-A-A to identify the fallen heroes.

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is responsible for attempting to identify unaccounted U.S. military personnel dating back to World ..

 

 
American remains go to the sophisticated Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's Forensic Identification Laboratory at Oahu in Hawaii to try to identify ...

 

 
Ketchum was identified in April by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Office. "It's a miracle," said Mary Jo Edge, Ketchum's daughter. Because it is an ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 August, 2018 08:32
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, Jr., 35, accounted for on March 19,

will be buried August 18 in his hometown.

 

Van Vleet, 35, of Fresno, California, Was killed during World War II.

 

His daughter, Ann Wagner, also of Fresno, is available for interviews at

(559) 439-7918.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Van Vleet on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Jan. 21, 1944, Van Vleet was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron,

(Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Betio Island,

Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when the B-24J bomber aircraft he was aboard

crashed shortly after take-off. 

 

Following the crash, the squadron's physician recovered the remains of six

individuals who died in the crash and interred them in Cemetery No. 33 on

Betio Island, one of several cemeteries established on the island. 

 

Following the war, the U.S. Army's 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and

1947.  Using Marine Corps records, they began the task of consolidating all

the remains from isolated burial sites into a single cemetery called Lone

Palm Cemetery.  The remains of the crew on the B-24J bomber were believed to

be among those moved, however Van Vleet's remains were not identified and he

was declared non-recoverable.

 

On Nov. 7, 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-014 from the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In May 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA returned

to Betio to conduct excavations of remains of men buried after the battle.

One set of remains was consolidated with the remains disinterred from X-014

and was sent to the lab for analysis.

 

To identify Van Vleet's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis, which matched his family, dental, and anthropological analysis,

which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., the Department of Veterans Affairs

and the Republic Kiribati of for their partnerships in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 73,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Van Vleet's name is recorded on the

Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, site along with the other MIAs from

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 August, 2018 08:35
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, accounted for on Jul 3, will be buried August 18 in

Albany, Kentucky.

 

Elmore, 20, of Seminary, Kentucky, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Debbie Bowlin, is available for interviews at (270) 791-7877.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Elmore on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion,

32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and

700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team

(RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it

was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese

attacks continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S.

Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers

had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because

Elmore could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in

action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

 

Elmore's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning

Americans reported him as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of

evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of May 1, 1953.

 

On Oct. 19, 1995, during a United Nations Command/Korean People's Army

meeting at Panmunjom, the KPA offered to repatriate the remains of a British

soldier killed during the Korean War.  The KPA identified the remains to be

Pvt. J. Edmunds, who was reportedly found by a KPA work crew in July 1995,

near Wangsan, Rimkangni, Kaesong City.  The remains were handed over on Oct.

30, 1995, and the British government asked DPAA's predecessors to identify

the remains.

 

On Feb. 28, 1996, the remains were declared unidentifiable. 

 

On Sept. 1, 1997, the British Army Headquarters Adjutant General, Personnel

and Training Command, sent a request to the Adjutant General, U.S. Army

Personnel Command, requesting the remains be returned for burial in Busan,

South Korea, during the visit of the British Korean Veterans Association to

Korea in April 1998.  The remains were transferred to the custody of British

authorities and were buried in a grave marked as "British Unknown."

 

Following the institution of the Korean War Project, DPAA was able to

associate the unknown remains with two missing U.S. service members. 

 

In November 2017, the remains were disinterred by the 8th Army Mortuary,

U.S. Forces Korea and transported to DPAA.

              

To identify Elmore's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR)

DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial

evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the British government and military authorities and

South Korean government for their partnership in this mission.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Elmore's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Elmore's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000RlYQJEA3

 
American troops in war zones have received combat pay since 1952. Yet for one group of warfighters — Korean War POW-MIAs — the supplemental ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lists 165 men from Wisconsin unaccounted for in the Korean War. According to the agency, more than ...
 
   
   
 
... ballistic missile (ICBM) test fire, dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations.
 
 
... dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations, Xinhua news agency reported.
 

 
American troops in war zones have received combat pay since 1952. Yet for one group of warfighters — Korean War POW-MIAs — the supplemental ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lists 165 men from Wisconsin unaccounted for in the Korean War. According to the agency, more than ...

 

 

 

 

 

 
... ballistic missile (ICBM) test fire, dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations.

 

 
... and Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, deputy director of the POW/MIA Accounting Agency, attend at a ceremony marking the arrival of the remains believed to ...

 

 
... dismantling its nuclear test ground and repatriating POW/MIA remains would contribute to improving relations, Xinhua news agency reported.
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 9 August, 2018 08:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During Korean War Accounted For (Duquette, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Leo J. Duquette, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for

on Aug. 8, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1597529/
soldier-killed-during-korean-war-accounted-for-duquette-l/

 

In July 1950, Duquette was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st

Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations

against North Korean forces near Choch'iwon, South Korea. Duquette could not

be accounted-for and was declared missing in action on July 11, 1950.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Duquette's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Duquette's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000007kTRyEAM

 

Sent: 8/8/2018 6:18:11 PM Eastern Standard Time
Subject: Great Podcast with Ann Mills-Griffiths (POW/MIA Families) and Kelly McKeague, Head of DPAA

Hi All, (Please pass this along to others)

 

Below is a link to a podcast from 8/2/18 - this is one of the best presentations I have heard about the recovery of Americans troops who are Still Missing & Uncounted for…it will give hope to POW/MIA families, Veterans and to those presently serving in the Military.

 

An exceptional job by all 3 interviewees:

1. Retired Air Force Maj Gen Kelly McKeague Head of DPAA

2. Ann Mills-Griffiths, Head of National League of POW/MIA Families

3. Mr. Bryan Bender, Defense Editor for Politico, Author (You Are Not Forgotten…)

4. The interviewer is a Guest Host, Celeste Headlee…also did a great job.

 

The interviews are on a podcast at the link below (once there, Click on the word “Listen” in an orange box)

 

 

Best to all, Bill Fortier

 


 

 

 
The remains – believed to be of U.S. servicemen killed in the Korean War – were taken to a lab in Hawaii run by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
WASHINGTON (Circa) Watch live in the video player below as both the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical ...

 

 
The Defense Department's POW/MIA Accounting Agency has spent years explaining their work to them and giving them updates on their individual ...

 

 

 

 
... believed to be 55 US soldiers recently returned to the US by North Korea. Today Defense officials Department POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the ...
... MIA service members who went to Korea from the Berkshires by comparing a list maintained by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in Hawaii ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is reporting that Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum will be buried next Tuesday. The 38-year-old was ...
 

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said in a news release Tuesday that Lane was co-piloting a B-17 bomber when it was hit by anti-aircraft ...
 

 

 

 

 
After the ceremony, pallbearers loaded the cases onto a C-17 headed to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam where the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 

 

 
Soon afterward, Mary Hoff joined the National League of POW/MIA Families, an organization founded by two wives of POW/MIA troops, Karen Butler ...

 

 
They have been transferred to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's lab for identification. However, more than 7,800 U.S. military personnel ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday that Col. Frederic Mellor was accounted for last month after the government of ...

 

 
The Pentagon-ordered merger created the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, with one chain of command and one budget. Read more at: ...

 

 
As Dr. John Byrd, chief scientist of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, put it ... Others perished in distant Chinese or North Korean POW camps.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 09:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, accounted for on April 23, will be

buried August 14 in his hometown.

 

Ketchum, 38, of Superior, Wisconsin, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His daughter, Mary Edge, also of Superior, is available for interviews at

(715) 392-3031.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Ketchum on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th

Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry

Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled

into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the

Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers

of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces

withdrew south.  The U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service

members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing

in enemy territory. McKinney was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950,

when he could not be accounted for after the withdrawal to Hagaru-ri.

 

Ketchum's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning

Americans reported Ketchum as a prisoner of war. Based on the testimony of a

surviving member of his unit who witnessed Ketchum's death, the U.S. Army

declared him deceased as of Dec. 6, 1950.

              

In September 2001, a joint U.S. and Korean People's Army (KPA) recovery ream

conducted a Joint Recovery Operation (JRO) in the vicinity of the Chosin

Reservoir, Changjin County, Chagjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North

Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses.  During the

excavation, the recovery team recovered material evidence and possible

osseous remains of at least seven individuals.  The remains were

subsequently sent to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Ketchum's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome

(Y-STR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, and material and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Ketchum's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Ketchum's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000004PGRHEA4

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 09:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Pennsylvania Marine Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Emil F. Ragucci, accounted for on Nov. 13, 2017,

will be buried August 14 in his hometown.

 

Ragucci, 19, of Philadelphia, was killed during the battle of Tarawa in

World War II.

 

His nephew, Charles Ragucci, is available for interviews at (610) 203-2272.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Ragucci on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Ragucci was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 2nd

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese

resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert

Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense

fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and

more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Ragucci died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance the

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration

Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Ragucci's

remains were not recovered. On Oct. 24, 1949, a military review board

declared Ragucci's remains non-recoverable.

              

In September 2013, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., JPAC (a

predecessor to DPAA) received the remains of a group that had been located

in the known area of Cemetery 33.  The remains were sent to the Central

Identification Laboratory in Honolulu for analysis.

              

To identify Ragucci's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and

material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Ragucci's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 7 August, 2018 12:11
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Airman Killed During World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces Flight Officer Richard W. Lane, accounted for on April 23,

will be buried August 9 in Gage, Nebraska.

 

Lane, 21, of Beatrice, Nebraska, was killed during World War II.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Lane on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In December 1944, Lane served with the 815th Bombardment Squadron, 483rd

Bombardment Group (Heavy), 15th Air Force.  He was killed on Dec. 27, 1944

when the B-17G aircraft he co-piloted was shot down on a bombardment mission

over Austria.  As Allied aircraft neared the target at Linz, Austria, they

encountered heavy anti-aircraft fire.  Lane's aircraft took a direct hit

over Linz and reportedly crashed near St. Florian, Austria. 

 

Lane and three other crew members were listed as buried in St. Florian

Cemetery on Dec. 29, 1944.

 

In May 1945, the American Graves Registration Command, in an effort to

investigate unresolved casualties that occurred in Europe, concluded that

one of the Airmen in Lane's aircraft was the only unresolved Airman killed

in close proximity to the recovery locationW of X-239.  Based on this

information, X-239 was disinterred but dental analysis was unable to make a

positive association with the Airman.  The remains were then reinterred in

the United States Military Cemetery Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, on Aug. 2,

1950.

 

In June 1945, the AGRC recovered four sets of remains from a single grave

near the cathedral in the St. Florian Cemetery.  The AGRC was able to

identify one set of remains, designating the others as Unknowns X-59, X-60

and X-61.  The unidentified remains were transferred to the temporary

cemetery in Nurnberg, Germany. 

 

In August 1945, unknown remains were disinterred from the Nurnberg cemetery

for reprocessing and moved to the U.S. military Cemetery at St. Avold,

France, where they were redesignated as X-239, X-240, X-241 and X-242 St.

Avold. 

 

In January 1946, the Quartermaster General identified the remains designated

X-240 to be Lane, subsequently burying them in the Filley Cemetery in Gage

County, Nebraska.

 

Based on DPAA's analysis of historical documents, it is likely that the

remains designated X-239 and X-240 became exchanged during or immediately

after the August 1945 movement to St. Avold. 

 

On June 8, 2017, a team from the U.S. Army Regional Mortuary-Europe/Africa,

working with the American Battle Monuments Commission, exhumed X-239 from

the Henri-Chapelle Cemetery.  The remains were transferred to DPAA for

analysis.

 

To identify Lane's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission, as well as to Lane's family for their support.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,906 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. 

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 
 
-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Korean war POW's compensation act
Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2018 09:14:43 -0400
From: Monica Cash <mavector4@gmail.com>

Please share and ask that people contact their members of Congress 
 
https://www.stripes.com/news/bill-seeks-combat-pay-for-korean-war-pows-that-was-capped-during-captivity-1.541233
 
 
Divers conduct a mission for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to investigate the underwater wreckage of an aircraft located near the coast of ...
 
As far as the return of Americans missing in action, or MIA, in the Korean War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) reported:.
 
 
Team and authorities from the United Nations Command with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) secure United Nations flags over the ...
 
 
... bunch of fallen Americans home,” said Rear Admiral Jon Kreitz, the deputy director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, according to CNN.

 

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says DNA testing as well as dental and anthropological analysis helped identify his remains, which were ...

 

 
World War II, the Vietnam War, and the wars in Iraq also need family members, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Immediate ...

 

 
... according to the medical examiner summary report from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is part of the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

 
Obviously, they have never read or been a part of the POW/MIA ceremony that states, in part, “the Bible serves to remind us of the comfort of faith ...

 

 
He is the 149th USS Oklahoma crew member to be identified through the efforts of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency laboratory at Offutt Air ...

 

THE NEW YORK TIMES


How the Defense Department Identifies the Remains of Our War Dead

By John Ismay Aug. 2, 2018

 

On Wednesday, two military cargo planes carrying 55 aluminum coffin-shaped cases landed at Hickam Air Force Base in Oahu, Hawaii.


Inside are presumed to be the remains of American service members who died in North Korea between 1950 and 1953 during the Korean War....

Fri, 3 Aug 2018 20:25:15 -0400

 

moe note:

I cannot tell you how many times in the past week we all have been subject to the press/journalistic question “Why 55 sets of remains? Didn’t the President say something about 200 sets of remains?” ‘Why are the boxes covered with a UNITED NATIONS Flag in lieu of an AMERICAN Flag?’    

I may sound biased, perhaps because I am. John Zimmerlee , for over two decades, has offered his expertise on the Korean War POW/MIA issue to Families of those still waiting on answers from our Government, i.e. DoD, DPMO, JPAC, DPAA, and he has made these same government units aware of his research in our own Government Archives specifically noting the improper classification of over 1000 military personal from the Korean War, i.e. Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered (KIA/BNR) when the Unit records indicate Missing in Action (MIA) or Captured (POW).

As Noted by Hal – let’s see if the infamous single “Dog Tag” matches a name on John’s list of 55. For the sake of the 55 Families I truly hope it is a match.

Until they all come home……….

 


 
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/08/02/remains-received-from-north-korea-consistent-with-being-us-service-members-pentagon-says.html
 

...The Pentagon exclusively showed Fox News military equipment that was found among the remains, including several pairs of boots, two helmets, several canteen bottles, dozens of buttons, buckles, a bayonet handle, socks and one pair of what appeared to be fingerless gloves.

One dog tag from a U.S. Army soldier was among the recovered equipment, and two sons of the deceased soldier will receive the dog tag next week.

Most of the remains returned to the U.S. were from the village of Sinheung Ri, near the Chosin Reservoir. The site hosted a famous battle fought from November to December of 1950 during the Korean War....


 

 
Kelly McKeague, director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency; Navy Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, the agency's deputy director; and Dr. John Byrd, ...

 

 

 

 

 

 
The younger Brady was just 59 days old when the plane carrying his father was hit by flak during a bomb run, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...

 

 
Kelly McKeague, Director, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which oversees the search for American prisoners of war and missing in action; ...

 

 
According to the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the 26-year-old John Brady was one of nine airmen on a mission to Merseburg ...

 

 
But the government lab with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which accounts for Americans lost in conflict, faces a challenge, ...

 

 
U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Feltz, mortuary affairs specialist assigned to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, secures a U.S. flag onto a ...

 

From: Ann Mills-Griffiths <powmiafam@aol.com>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 17:21
Subject: Re: DPAA Press Briefing at Pentagon on DPRK Remains

 

Click on this link to see Kelly McKeague, DPAA Director, and Dr. John Byrd (from Hawaii) on a live DoD briefing to interested press.   Kelly begins with a statement, then opens the floor to questions, and the entire press conference is one hour long.  You'll learn a lot, mostly about the remains of assumed US personnel unaccounted-for from the Korean War and the prognosis for the future, as well as ID's on those returned.  It is worthwhile.   Best to all, Ann

 



https://www.defense.gov/live/#/?currentVideo=16342

 

Try this in case you are not successful with the above - https://www.defense.gov/Videos/

This is a 55 minute press conference video.

 

 

Ann Mills-Griffiths

Chairman of the Board/CEO

National League of POW/MIA Families

5673 Columbia Pike, Suite 100

Falls Church, VA  22041

703-465-7432

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 14:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Georgia Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, accounted for on April 13, will be buried Aug.

11 in his hometown.

 

Fuller, 20, of Toccoa, Georgia, was captured and killed during the Korean

War.

 

His grand-niece, Amy Hix is available for interviews at (706) 224-3531.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Fuller on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army

attacks against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an

area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea.  After enduring sustained

enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea.  It was

during this withdrawal that Fuller was reported missing, as of Feb. 12,

1951.

 

In December 1951, Fuller's name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and

Korean People's Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their

custody.  Following the war, a fellow soldier from the same company reported

that he had been held prisoner with Fuller, but was unaware of his status.

When Fuller was not returned after the armistice, the U.S. Army declared him

deceased as of Feb. 18, 1954.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the

remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who died during the war. On May 20,

1990, North Korea turned over five boxes of remains believed to be

unaccounted-for servicemen from the war.

 

To identify Fuller's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological and chest radiograph comparison

analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Fuller's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Fuller's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004nzUEAQ

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 2 August, 2018 14:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Pennsylvania Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. William A. Larkins, accounted for on May 4, 2017, will be buried

Aug. 10, in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania.

 

Larkins, 20, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Larkins on file.

 

For more information, contact:

 

SFC Kristen Duus

Chief of External Communications

Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

2300 Defense Pentagon

Washington, D.C 20301-2300

(703) 699-1420

Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

 

OR:

 

Chuck Prichard, APR

Director, Public Affairs

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

(703) 699-1169

charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Larkins was a member of A Battery, 503rd Field

Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting off persistent Chinese

attacks in the Ch'ongch'on River region of North Korea.  Through a series of

attacks, the Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) pressed 2ID units into local

withdrawals to avoid being outflanked.  On the night of Nov. 25, 1950, the

Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) began relentless attacks which

continued until the end of the month.  On Dec. 1,1950, the 503rd FA BN began

their movement down the Main Supply Route under continuous enemy mortar,

small arms and machine gun fire, toward the town of Sunchon, where Larkins

was reported missing in action.

 

Following the war, one returning prisoner of war reported that Larkins had

been captured and had died at an unknown prisoner of war camp in January

1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of

Jan. 31, 1951.

 

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA,) and

KPA Recovery Team conducted the 37th Joint Field Activity in Unsan County,

North Pyongan Province, North Korea.  A site southeast of the

Pukchin-Tarigol Prisoner of war camp cluster was found to have probable

human remains and material evidence, and was completely excavated.  The

remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis on May 27, 2005.

 

To identify Larkins' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome short

tandem repeat (Y-SYR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as dental

and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery

of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,691 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Larkins' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004qm5EAA

 

 
1, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Jerick Johnson, lead driver and spokesman for the POW-MIA Freedom Car, part of a national awareness campaign honoring ...

 

 
The remains will be examined at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, and experts there will be responsible for identifying the remains.

 

 

 

 
Vice President Mike Pence and Navy Rear Adm. Jon Kreitz, deputy director of the POW/MIA Accounting Agency, right, watch as military members carry ...

 

 
... are bound for a forensic laboratory run by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in Honolulu, for testing that may finally offer answers to families ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or D.P.A.A., which is tasked with investigating and recovering fallen military personnel, announced the ...

 

 
... Tuskegee Airmen and one of just 27 who went missing during the war, have been found in Austria, per the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Soldier Killed During World War II Accounted For (Shankles, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Army Pfc. Leslie Shankles, killed during World War II, was accounted for on

July 12, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589682/
soldier
-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-shankles-l/

 

In October 1944, Shankles was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th

Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. He was killed Oct. 14, 1944 by

enemy fire in the Raffelsbrand sector of the Hürtgen Forest, near Germeter,

Germany.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Shankles’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Margraten, Netherlands, along with the others missing from WWII. Although

interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Shankles’ grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Goldtrap, C.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on June 1, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589679/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-goldtrap-c/

 

In November 1943, Goldtrap was assigned to Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor

Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Goldtrap died on the first day of the battle, Nov.

20, 1943, during the first wave of the assault.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Goldtrap's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420.

 

Goldtrap's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XknREAS

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 31 July, 2018 16:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Zehetner, R.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner, killed during World War II,

was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1589633/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-zehetner-r/

 

In November 1943, Zehetner was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Zehetner died on the first day of the battle, Nov.

20, 1943.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Zehetner's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.