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AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

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Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Jan 2017 - Dec 2017

 

2018
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2018

  
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Sgt. 1st Class James L. Boyce U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/11/1950 South Korea 10/2/2018
2nd Lt. James R. Lord U.S. Army Air Forces 66th Fighter Squadron, 57th Fighter Group, 12th Tactical Air Command, 12th Air Force 8/10/1944 France 10/2/2018
1st Lt. Allen R. Turner U.S. Army Air Forces 1330 Army Air Force Base Unit, Air Transport Command 7/17/1945 India 10/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Herbert J. Poindexter U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 10/1/2018
Chief Pharmacist's Mate James T. Cheshire U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/28/2018
Pfc. Marvin E. Dickson U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 11/13/1944 Germany 9/27/2018
Storekeeper 2nd Class Gerald L. Clayton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/26/2018
Musician 2nd Class Francis E. Dick U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/26/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Deward W. Duncan, Jr. U.S. Naval Reserve Aviation, Construction, Ordinance, Repair, Navy Fourteen, Standard Landing Craft Unit 4 1/12/1944 Tarawa 9/26/2018
Pfc. Joseph I. Natvik U.S. Army Air Forces 1330 Army Air Force Base Unit, Air Transport Command 7/17/1945 India 9/26/2018
Pfc. John W. Martin U.S. Army Medical Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 9/25/2018
Pfc. Lewis E. Price U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 11/6/1944 Germany 9/24/2018
Fireman 1st Class Claude O. Gowey U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Millard Burk U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/20/2018
Seaman 2nd Class David B. Edmonston U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/20/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Merle A. Smith U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/20/2018
Cpl. Edward M. Jones U.S. Army Reserve Company D, 1st Battalion 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 North Korea 9/19/2018
Pvt. Charles G. Kaniatobe U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/10/1950 South Korea 9/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert W. Headington U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/14/2018
Staff Sgt. Karl R. Loesche U.S. Army 3rd Pursuit Squadron, 24th Pursuit Group 11/16/1942 Philippines 9/13/2018
Master Sgt. Charles H. McDaniel U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment Medical Company 11/2/1950 North Korea 9/13/2018
Pfc. William H. Jones U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/26/1950 North Korea 9/13/2018
Sgt. Eugene G. McBride U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 311th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 9/12/2018
Seaman 1st Class James W. Holzhauer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/10/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Bruce H. Ellison U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/10/2018
Tech. Sgt. Robert J. Fitzgerrell U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 311th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 9/7/2018
Water Tender 2nd Class Edgar D. Gross U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/6/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Robert J. Bennett U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/6/2018
Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/6/2018
Seaman 1st Class George E. Naegle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Seaman 1st Class Earl P. Baum U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Seaman 1st Class Joseph K. Maule U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 9/5/2018
Staff. Sgt. Herbert W. Harms U.S. Army Air Forces 569th Bombardment Squadron, 390th Bombardment Group, 13th Combat Bombardment Wing, 3rd Air Division, 8th Air Force 8/16/1944 Germany 9/4/2018
1st Lt. John D. Crouchley, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 828th Bombardment Squadron, 485th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 6/28/1944 Bulgaria 9/4/2018
Sgt. 1st Class James S. Streetman, Jr. U.S. Army Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/22/1950 South Korea 9/4/2018
Pfc. Leonard A. Tyma U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 9/4/2018
1st Lt. Seymour P. Drovis U.S. Army Company A, 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division 7/7/1944 Saipan 9/4/2018
Pfc. Alva J. Cremean U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/30/2018
Sgt. Millard Odom U.S. Marine Corps Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 8/30/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Dante S. Tini U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/29/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Myron K. Lehman U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Richard L. Watson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/28/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Carl D. Dorr U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Seaman 1st Ckass Hale McKissack U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Seaman 1st Class Wesley V. Jordan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Fire Controlman 1st Class Edward J. Shelden U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/27/2018
Fireman 1st Class Albert U. Kane U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Fireman 1st Class Bert E. McKeeman U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Archie T. Miles U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/24/2018
Pharmacist's Mate 3rd Class William H. Blancheri U.S. Naval Reserve HQ Company, 2md Battalion, 2nd Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 8/24/2018
Cmdr. James B. Mills U.S. Navy Fighter Squadron Twenty One, USS Coral Sea 9/21/1966 Vietnam 8/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Eugene K. Eberhardt U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/20/2018
Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 8/17/2018
Pvt. WIlliam A. Boegli U.S. Army Company L, 332nd Infantry Regiment, 81st Infantry Division 9/30/1944 Republic of Palau 8/17/2018
Pfc. Morris R. Worrell U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment 9/27/1942 Philippines 8/16/2018
Pfc. George L. Spangenberg U.S. Army Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/2/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr. US. Army Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/12/1950 North Korea 8/15/2018
Pfc. Leo J. Duquette U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/11/1950 South Korea 8/8/2018
Aviation Chief Ordnanceman Otis E. Ingram U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 8/8/2018
Pfc. John A. Taylor U.S. Army Company C, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 8/7/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Wilbur C. Barrett U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 8/2/2018
Pfc. Leslie E. Shankles U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 10/14/1944 Germany 7/30/2018
Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson U.S. Army Air Forces 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group 12/23/1944 Austria 7/27/2018
Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/26/2018
Pfc. Merton R. Riser U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/26/2018
1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell U.S. Army Air Forces 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force 1/27/1944 France 7/25/2018
2nd Lt. Martin F. O'Callaghan, Jr. U.S. Army Air Forces 96th Fighter Squadron, 82nd Fighter Group 2/14/1945 Slovenia 7/24/2018
Pvt. John B. Cummings U.S. Army Company A, 276th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division 12/31/1944 France 7/23/2018
Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 7/23/2018
Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 7/23/2018
Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 7/20/2018
Cpl. Albert E. Mills U.S. Army Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 7/25/1950 South Korea 7/17/2018
Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn U.S. Army Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 4/30/1951 North Korea 7/16/2018
Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 7/13/2018
Col. Frederic M. Mellor U.S. Air Force Reserve 30th Tactical Squadron/ 15th Tactical Recon Forces 8/13/1965 Vietnam 7/13/2018
Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 7/20/1950 South Korea 7/12/2018
Pfc. Joe S. Elmore U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 7/5/2018
Pfc. Willard Jenkins U.S. Army Company C, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division 9/20/1944 The Netherlands 7/5/2018
Pvt. Donald E. Brown U.S. Army Company A, 745th Tank Battalion 7/28/1944 France 6/29/2018
2nd Lt. Hulen A. Leinweber U.S. Army Air Forces 40th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group 6/10/1945 Philippines 6/29/2018
Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/28/2018
Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus U.S. Navy U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty-One (VT-51) 7/27/1944 Republic of Palau 6/28/2018
Pfc. Roger Gonzales U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/26/2018
Sgt. James K. Park U.S. Army Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division 11/23/1944 Germany 6/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr. U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/21/2018
Pfc. Robert K. Holmes U.S. Marine Corps USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/12/2018
Fireman 1st Class Lewis F. Tindall U.S. Naval Reserve USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/6/2018
Pfc. Paul D. Gilman U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 6/5/2018
Cpl. Morris Meshulam U.S. Army Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Master Sgt. Carl H. Lindquist U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 11/29/1950 North Korea 6/5/2018
Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 6/4/2018
Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran U.S. Army Air Forces 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 2/25/1941 Slovenia 5/31/2018
Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 5/31/2018
Lt. Cmdr. Larry R. Kilpatrick U.S. Naval Reserve Attack Squadron One Hundred Five (VA-105) 6/18/1972 Vietnam 5/18/2018
Sgt. John W. Hall U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battlion, 2nd Infantry Division 12/1/1950 North Korea 5/16/2018
Ensign Harold P. DeMoss U.S. Naval Reserve Fighting Squadron 100 (VF-100) 6/23/1945 O'ahu Hawaii 5/11/2018
Cpl. DeMaret M. Kirtley U.S. Army Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 5/11/2018
Seaman 2nd Class William V. Campbell U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941   5/10/2018
Sgt. Melvin C. Anderson U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Cpl. Joseph Akers U.S. Army Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 11/25/1944 Germany 5/10/2018
Shopfitter 3rd Class John M. Donald U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/8/2018
Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/4/2018
Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 5/3/2018
Pfc. William F. Cavin U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 5/2/2018
Pfc. Oscar E. Sappington U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/11/1945 Germany 4/27/2018
Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 2/12/1951 South Korea 4/27/2018
Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris U.S. Army Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 11/28/1944 Germany 4/26/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum U.S. Army Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 4/24/2018
Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/23/2018
Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/20/2018
Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte U.S. Army Air Forces 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force 8/1/1943 Romania 4/16/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/13/2018
Pfc. John H. Walker U.S. Arny Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry DIvision 11/24/1944 Germany 4/13/2018
Gunners Mate 3rd Class Marvin B. Adkins U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/11/2018
Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/10/2018
Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 4/9/2018
Sgt. Eugene W. Yost U.S. Army Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division 9/3/1950 South Korea 4/9/2018
Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser U.S. Marine Corps Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 4/6/2018
Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan U.S. Army Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/12/1950 South Korea 4/3/2018
Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews U.S. Army Air Forces 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force 5/29/1943 France 3/28/2018
Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 3/28/2018
Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/27/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/26/2018
Capt. George Van Vleet U.S. Army Air Forces 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group 1/21/1944 Tarawa 3/22/2018
Sgt. Donald L. Baker U.S. Army Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/20/2018
Col. Peter J. Stewart U.S. Air Force Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing 3/15/1966 Vietnam 3/19/2018
Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/16/2018
Cpl. James I. Jubb U.S. Army Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Division 8/10/1950 South Korea 3/14/2018
Sgt. Julius E. McKinney U.S. Army Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 3/14/2018
Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz U.S. Army Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 9/28/1944 Netherlands 3/14/2018
Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2018
1st Lt. William W. Shank U.S. Army Air Forces 338th Fighter Squadron 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force 11/13/1943 Germany 3/6/2018
Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 5/30/1945 Japan 2/28/2018
Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/23/2018
Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/21/2018
Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/20/2018
2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/22/1943 Tarawa 2/20/2018
Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile U.S. Army Comapny E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/20/2018
Pfc. Joe Lukie U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 2/16/2018
Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak U.S. Army Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division 1/30/1945 Germany 2/14/2018
Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/13/2018
Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/8/2018
Pfc. David Baker U.S. Army Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/8/2018
Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp U.S. Army 131st Aviation Company 7/13/1966 Laos 2/2/2018
Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/1/2018
Pfc. Jack H. Krieger U.S. Marine Corps Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/31/2018
Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/31/2018
Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/26/2018
Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/19/2018
Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon U.S. Army Gompany G, 8th Cavalry Regiment 9/5/1950 South Korea 1/19/2018
Pfc. Lamar E. Newman U.S. Army Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/27/1950 North Korea 1/19/2018
1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford U.S. Army Air Forces 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force 12/17/1944 Croatia 1/19/2018
Cpl. William C. McDowell U.S. Army Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 1/17/2018
Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/17/2018
Seaman 1st Class Willard H. Aldridge U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/8/2018
Col. Edgar F. Davis U.S. Air Force 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing 9/17/1968 Laos 12/30/2017

List posted 10/05/18

 
Some names in articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" yet when published.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

SOME HIGHLIGHTS NOTE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN HEADLINES ("captured")  AND KNOWN ("MIA") STATUS.

 
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 26 October, 2018 08:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Tennessee Airman Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Martin F. O'Callaghan, Jr., accounted for on April

24, 2018, will be buried November 5 in his hometown.

 

O'Callaghan, 22, of Memphis, Tennessee, was killed during World War II.

 

His nephew, Mark Johnson, is available for interviews at (406) 860-8127.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of O'Callaghan on file.

 

For more information regarding the funeral, contact the Army Service

Casualty Office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For more information about DPAA, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In February 1945, O'Callaghan was a pilot with the 96th Fighter Squadron,

82nd Fighter Group, on a mission to strafe targets near Maribor, Yugoslavia,

now Slovenia.  While attacking locomotives near a railway station,

O'Callaghan's P-38 Lightning aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire.  He

radioed his squadron-mates to say that he might attempt to bail out of the

aircraft, however, according to witnesses, he attempted to land the aircraft

in a field southeast of Maribor.  As he was attempting to land, the aircraft

inverted, crashed and burst into flames.  Because Yugoslavia was an occupied

territory at the time, no immediate search for his remains could be

conducted.

 

In July 1947, a team from the American Graves Registration Service office in

Belgrade, Yugoslavia, traveled to the village of Cirkovce to investigate a

report that a U.S. service member had been buried there during the war.  The

local government, the People's Committee of Ptuj, told the AGRS that a

Lightning aircraft crashed near Cirkovce after being shot down.  According

to locals, the pilot was killed in the crash and his remains were buried in

the cemetery at Cirkovce.  The remains were designated Unknown X-36 and

buried in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Belgrade. 

 

In 1948, based on serial number association, X-36 was recommended for

possible identification.  However, the evidence was not conclusive and in

April 1949, Unknown X-36 was interred at Sicily-Rome American Cemetery, in

Nettuno, Italy.

 

In May 2016, based on thorough research and historical analysis, an

investigation was initiated linking O'Callaghan's remains to X-36.  On March

16, 2017, the remains of Unknown X-36 Belgrade were disinterred and

accessioned to the DPAA laboratory.

 

To identify O'Callaghan's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, as well as

anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war. 

 

Currently there are 72,790 service members (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

O'Callaghan's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence

American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in

Impruneta, Italy, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as

an "unknown", his grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by

the American Battle Monuments Commission.  A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 25 October, 2018 10:03
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: North Carolina USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland, accounted for on March 16, 2018,

will be buried November 3 in his hometown.

 

Outland, 22, of Murfreesboro, North Carolina, was killed during the attack

on the USS Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His niece, Elnora Parker, of Boykins, Virginia, is available for interviews

at (252) 862-5762.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Outland on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Outland was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Outland. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Outland.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Outland's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and

material evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,790 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Outland's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Outland's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XhSuEAK

 


 
According to the "Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency," there are still 72-thousand service members from World War two that are unaccounted for.

 10/24/18


 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on Tuesday announced the remains of Army Sgt. James K. Park of Beaumont will be buried Saturday in ...

 

 
In an article in the Khmer Times Ericksen stated, “As we have discussed before… my government… agrees to resume this important POW/MIA field ...

 

 
The Defense POW-MIA Accounting Agency says Gilman's remains were buried in a military cemetery immediately after the fighting and weren't ...

 

 
The Defense Department's Prisoner Of War/Missing In Action (POW/MIA) Accounting Agency identified his remains. Behind a small Baptist church ...

 

 
WASHINGTON-- The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from World War ...

 

 

 

 
Several of the motorcycles and other vehicles were adorned with American flags and other banners showing a branch of service or the POW-MIA flag.

 

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 23 October, 2018 11:58
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Texas Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. James K. Park, accounted for on June 20, 2018, will be buried

October 27 in Barry, Texas.

 

Park, 20, of Beaumont, Texas, was killed during World War II.

 

His daughter, Kay G. Crawford, of Bridgeport, Texas, is available for

interviews at (817) 773-0513.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Park on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1944, Park was a member of Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment,

1st Infantry Division, engaged in fierce fighting within the Hürtgen Forest

in Germany.  Park was reported missing in action on Nov. 23, 1944, when he

was believed to have been wounded by shrapnel.  Due to continuous enemy

fire, Soldiers from Park’s company were prevented from searching for him.

Additionally, no graves registration teams reported finding his remains.

Due to no information regarding his whereabouts, his status was amended to

deceased as of Nov. 24, 1945.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) collected

thousands of unknown sets of remains from battlefields in Germany, and

labeled each set with an X-number.  None of the remains that were found

could be associated with Park by AGRC technicians, and his remains were

declared non-recoverable.

 

In December 1946, AGRC personnel recovered an unidentified set of remains

from a civilian cemetery at Langerwehe, Germany, on the northern edge of the

Hürtgen Forest.  German locals said the remains were originally found by a

local resident on Aug. 1, 1946 near the estate of Jüngersdorf in the forest.

Following the recovery, the remains were processed at the Central

Identification Point at Neuville, Belgium, and buried as an unknown, labeled

X-4731 Neuville.

 

Following thorough research and analysis of American Soldiers missing from

ground combat within Germany’s Hürtgen Forest, a DPAA historian concluded

that there was a possible association between X-4731 and Park.  The remains

were disinterred on June 28, 2017 and the remains were sent to the DPAA for

analysis.

 

To identify Park’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as

dental and anthropological analysis.

 

DPAA is grateful to American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership with this mission. 

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,790 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Park’s name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission in Margraten, along with the others missing from WWII.

Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Park’s grave

was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.  A rosette

will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Sent: 23 October, 2018 11:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: New Mexico Marine Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Paul D. Gilman, accounte for on May 17, 2018, will

be buried October 26 in his hometown.

 

Gilman, 19, of Belen, New Mexico, was killed during World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contated by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Gilman on file. 

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1943, Gilman was assigned to Company M, 3rd Battalion, 8th

Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed

against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa

Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over

several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and

Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Gilman died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the

Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which

to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their

Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island. In the case of Gilman, records indicate his remains were

recovered and were buried in Division Cemetery #3, which was later renamed

Cemetery #27. In 1946 the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company

(604th GRC) centralized all of the American remains found on Betio Island to

Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known

casualties from the battle were not found., Gilman's remains were among

those not recovered. On Oct. 14, 1949, a military review board declared

Gilman's remains non-recoverable.

              

In May and June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc.,

notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and

recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought

during the battle in November 1943. Subsequent recoveries in November 2015

and February 2016 resulted in additional remains.  The remains were turned

over to DPAA in June 2016.

 

To identify Gilman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this

mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,790 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Gilman's name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in

WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Gilman's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004ramEAA

 

10/23/18

 
Akron man, an MIA Korean War vet, is finally laid to rest ..... He was identified through DNA by scientists with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
On Saturday, November 3rd, Rolling Thunder KY 5 will dedicate four (4) POW*MIA Chairs of Honor to be stationed in all four corners of Kroger Field.

 

 
WASHINGTON The remains of a soldier killed in World War II will return to Kansas on Wednesday. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of 33-year-old Army Pfc. Leslie E. Shankles are being returned to his family for burial with ...

 

 
But two years ago, after a nine-day search, an investigation and excavation team with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) was able to ...
10/22/18

 
The measure has the support of the numerous organizations, including the American Legion and the National League of POW/MIA Families.
10/20/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) made the announcement Wednesday. The Olson-Frary-Burkhart Post 1165 VFW will assist the ...
 
 
In 1993, a United States POW/MIA recovery team excavated the crash site, recovering miniscule bone fragments and related aircrew artifacts.
10/19/18 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Wednesday that the remains of Mr. Lescault, a sailor on the USS Oklahoma, were officially ...

 

 
24, according to a statement from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which works to identify the remains of service members killed in past ...

 

 
Thunderstorms limited visibility, and the mountainous landscape cut off radar and radio contact, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
The men and women of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency are heroes, too, for developing the methods needed to identify Jubb while ...

 

 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, his remains were accounted for on June 20 of this year. He was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery ...

 

 
Team members assigned to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency cut cake during a celebration at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Oct. 12.
10/18/18

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Wednesday that the remains of Mr. Lescault, a sailor on the USS Oklahoma were officially ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said this week that Lescault, who was killed in the Japanese attack on the USS Oklahoma at Pearl Harbor, ...
 

So sad that an entire French village knew what happened and named a town after this US serviceman,  yet our government didn’t know what happened to him for 60 years.    db


 
WWII Widow Finds Husband’s Resting Place 60-Years Later | DoDLive


http://www.dodlive.mil/2012/11/20/wwii-widow-finds-husbands-resting-place-60-years-later/
10/17/18
 
However, through their meetings with Sen, the local legislators found the POW/MIA program was very important to him, Buys said. “I believe this is a ...
 
... traveled to eastern Germany in July to assist the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency in an operation to recover artifacts from a downed aircraft.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 17 October, 2018 09:22
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Kansas Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Leslie E. Shankles, accounted for on July 12, 2018, will be buried

October 24 in Fort Scott, Kansas.

 

Shankles, 33, of Arcadia, Kansas, was killed during World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Shankles on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In October 1944, Shankles was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th

Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division.  He was killed Oct. 14, 1944 by

enemy fire in the Raffelsbrand sector of the Hürtgen Forest, near Germeter,

Germany. 

 

In 1947, a local German resident discovered remains in the Raffelsbrand

section of the Hürtgen Forest.  The remains could not be identified, and

were buried as Unknown X-5391 in Neuville Cemetery, now Ardennes American

Cemetery, in Belgium.

 

Following thorough research and analysis of American Soldiers missing from

Europe, DPAA historians concluded that there was a strong association

between Neuville Unknown X-5391 and Shankles.  DPAA disinterred X-5391 in

June 2017 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory.

 

To identify Shankles’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,796 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Shankles’ name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the

others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville

American Cemetery, Shankles’ grave was meticulously cared for over the past

70 years by the ABMC.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 16 October, 2018 07:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin Soldier Accounted For From World War II Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pvt. John B. Cummings, accounted for on July 12, 2018, was buried

October 13 in Hazelhurst, Wisconsin.

 

Cummings, 22, of Hartford, Wisconsin, was killed during World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Cummings on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

 

/////

 

In December 1944, Cummings was a member of Company A, 276th Infantry

Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, along the France and Germany border to

reinforce the Alsace area.  On Dec. 31, 1944, German troops crossed the

Rhine River into France.  As darkness fell, two member of Cummings' company

passed him as he sat in a foxhole near the riverbank.  Sometime later, U.S.

troops heard German machine gun fire and maneuvered their way back to

Cummings' foxhole.  The troops were unable to find Cummings, but they did

find a helmet with a bullet hole.  Despite extensive recovery efforts,

Cummings' remains were unable to be located.

 

Following the close of hostilities, the American Graves Registration Command

(AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who

were killed in battle. In 1946, investigators met with the mayor of

Iffezheim, Germany, who informed them that the remains of an American

Soldier were buried in his community near the bank of the Rhine River.  The

mayor directed the American investigator to a local German veteran who had

been present at the burial.  A wooden cross indicated the remains belonged

to an American serviceman, who died on Dec. 31, 1944.  The remains were

disinterred and transferred to the American Military Cemetery and

identification processing center at St. Avold France, where they were

labeled as Unknown X-6454.

 

The remains, unable to be identified, were interred in the American cemetery

at St. Avold, present day Lorraine American Cemetery, in France.

 

Following thorough research and analysis of American Soldiers missing from

Europe, DPAA historians concluded that there was a strong association

between Unknown X-6454 and Cummings.  DPAA disinterred X-6454 in October

2016 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory.

 

To identify Cummings' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA

analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material

evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the French Government and the American Battle Monuments

Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,796 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Cummings' name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Epinal American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Dinoze, France, along with the others missing

from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery,

Cummings' grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the

ABMC.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been

accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 15 October, 2018 14:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams, accounted for on Aug. 13, 2018, will be

buried October 22 in Seville, Ohio.

 

Williams, 38, of Akron, Ohio, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His niece, Patricia A. Kegg, also of Akron, is available for interviews at

(330) 510-0570.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Williams on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November 1950, Williams was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd

Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700

South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT),

which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was

attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks

continued, American forces withdrew south.  By December 6, the U.S. Army

evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had

been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Williams was

reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after he was last seen near the

Chosin Reservoir.

 

Williams' name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists, however

returning Americans reported Williams died as a prisoner of war. Based on

this information, he was declared deceased as of Jan. 31, 1951.

              

On Nov. 30, 1993, North Korea turned over 33 boxes, believed to hold the

remains of unaccounted-for U.S. servicemen from the Korean War.  The

reported recovery location of one of the boxes was in Kaljoh-ri, Changjin

County, South Hamyong Province, North Korea, near where Williams was last

seen.

 

To identify Williams' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,677 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Williams' name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Williams' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000aq4djEAA

10/15/18

 

 
On March 13, 2017, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System exhumed the uknown remains to ...

 

 
“There are families still carrying the torch,” said Carrie Brown, a forensic anthropologist with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's lab at Offutt.

 

 
They had found the lost Medal of Honor recipient. The skeleton was almost completely there since it was not wrapped in a poncho upon burial.

 

 
A spokesman for the ruling party said on Sunday that Cambodia's resumption of the POW/MIA programme was a “humanitarian act” which highlighted ...

 

 
10-15-2018. FERNDALE, Wash. — Cambodia's prime minister has agreed to resume the search for remains of missing U.S. military members from the ...
 
He was flying an F4F-4 Wildcat when he was reporting missing in action after being shot down, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
Last year, based on research regarding two individuals who remained unaccounted-for from Jubb's unit, analysts from the Defense POW/MIA ...
10/14/18
 
Prime Minister Hun Sen suspended the POW/MIA program when Washington stopped issuing some visas after Cambodia refused to accept citizens ...
 
 
“We have seen media reports noting a decision by the [Cambodian government] to resume humanitarian cooperation on POW/MIA issues,” Ms ...
 
 
On March 13, 2017, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System exhumed the uknown remains to ...
10/13/18
 
... to Cambodian Prime Minister Samdech Techo Hun Sen on Oct. 2, wishing for the re-activation of the prisoners of war or missing in action (POW/MIA) ...

The letter was in response to the Washingtonians' written wish for the re-activation of the POW/MIA program in Cambodia and their appreciation of ...
10/12/18
 
I had a forensic genealogist call me that tracked me down and was wanting to know if we would consider contributing DNA to the POW MIA Agency ...
 
 
... island, and in July, 2013, History Flight, Inc. found remains in Cemetery #33 and turned them over to Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).
 
So he set up a POW MIA table in his restaurant's window. ... "It's usually 'that's really cool you have a POW table,' and they know what it means, they ...
 
 
Then, in July 2013, History Flight Inc. found remains in the same area and turned them into the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA).
 
But thanks to modern technology and the US Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, his family has found closure. In December 1941 ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 October, 2018 11:28
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Fireman 2nd Class George C. Ford, accounted for on April 30, 2018, will

be buried October 20 in Glidden, Iowa.

 

Ford, 25, of Lidderdale, Iowa, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, George E. Ford, is available for interviews at (337) 322-5570.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Ford on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ford was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Ford. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Ford.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for identification.

 

To identify Ford's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,799 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Ford's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Ford's persoonel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XhDBEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 October, 2018 09:36
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Maryland Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. James I. Jubb, accounted for on Jan. 25, 2018, will be buried Oct.

17 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

 

Jubb, 21, of Eastport, Maryland, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Jubb on file.

 

Media interested in attending the funeral should contact Arlington National

Cemetery Public Affairs at 703-614-0024.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In August 1950, Jubb was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry

Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, his unit suffered heavy losses while

fighting units of the North Korean People's Army in the vicinity of the

Naktong River, South Korea.  Jubb was reported missing in action on Aug. 10,

1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit.  His remains were later

declared unrecoverable.

 

In October 1951, the Army Graves Registration Services recovered four sets

of unidentified American remains from a mountain near Ohang, South Korea,

which is located east of the Naktong River.  One set of remains, designated

"Unknown X-2160" could not be identified and were subsequently interred at

the National Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu.

 

In 2017, based on research regarding two individuals who remained

unaccounted-for from Jubb's unit, analysts from DPAA determined that Unknown

X-2160 could likely be identified.  DPAA disinterred Unknown X-2160 in

October 2017 and sent the remains to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Jubb's remains, scientists used dental and anthropological

analysis, as well as chest radiograph comparison, which matched his records.

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Today, 7,677 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Jubb's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu along with the others who are missing

from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Jubb's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000cV30HEAS

 

 

10/11/18
 

 
His work frequently brings him in contact with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Darcy expressed some frustration with the pace of the ...

 

 
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Armed Forces Medical Examiner System scientists identified Carlsen using DNA, dental, anthropological ...

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Account Agency, which identified Doyle's remains, reports that from December 1941 to June 1944, naval personnel recovered ...

 

 
The National Museum of History of Romania (MNIR) has signed a collaboration agreement with the United States Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

 

 
The team, which included a forensic scientist and a historian, were from the Defense POW/MIA Accountancy Agency whose mission is to provide the ...
10/10/18
 
In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo, Franklin Damann, deputy lab director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) Identification laboratory, ...
 
His work frequently brings him in contact with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, or DPAA. Darcy expressed some frustration with the pace of ...
 
On June, 2015, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) began exhuming remains from the Punchbowl for identification. Campbell was ...
 
 
The DOD's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency continues to accelerate the identifications of service member remains, thanks to a variety of factors ...
 
... as they attempted to secure the island over several days of intense fighting, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency website.

From: Prichard, Charles L CIV DPAA OC (US) <charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil>

Sent: 10 October, 2018 16:51
To: Prichard, Charles L CIV DPAA OC (US) <charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil>
Subject: DPAA Accounts for 203 Missing Personnel in Fiscal Year 2018

DPAA Accounts for 203 Missing Personnel in Fiscal Year 2018

Oct. 10, 2018

WASHINGTON-  In Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
(DPAA) accounted for 203 formerly missing persons from past conflicts, the
highest yearly total reached by the agency or its predecessor organizations.
Also, the agency individually identified the remains of three additional
personnel, who were previously accounted for as part of group burials,
reaching another milestone of 206 individual identifications for the FY.

"Providing the families of the missing those long-sought answers with which
they can at least achieve some solace is a profound manifestation of our
nation's steadfast commitment to them and their loved ones.  Because it's a
sacred obligation, if not moral imperative, our over 600 military and
civilian professionals earnestly contribute their talents, dedication, and
passion to the noble mission with which we are entrusted," said DPAA
Director Kelly McKeague.

Broken down by conflict, 10 were accounted for from the Vietnam War, 37 from
the Korean War, and 156 were from World War II.

"Science and technology have expanded exponentially in recent years,
enabling identifications that even five years ago seemed impossible.  We
also attribute the increasing yearly trend to DPAA's expanded use of
partnerships, a more precise management of disinterments, and improvements
in our robust field operations,' said Rear Admiral Jon Kreitz, DPAA's Deputy
Director for Operations.

DPAA's partnerships are strong and extensive.  First, the government
officials and people in each of the countries the agency operates in provide
invaluable assistance and respect to the mission.  Collaborative support
from the four Service Casualty Offices; the Armed Forces Medical Examiner
System and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory; U.S. Indo Pacific
Command, the U.S. European Command and the Defense Intelligence Agency -
Stony Beach; the Department of Veterans Affairs and the American Battle
Monuments Commission cemeteries are also vital.  DPAA's partnering with
non-Federal entities continues to expand agency capacity and capabilities.
Additionally, agency efforts benefit from partnerships with Family Groups
and Veterans Service Organizations.

Today, the DPAA is focused on the research, investigation, recovery, and
identification of the approximately 34,000 (out of approximately 83,000
missing DoD personnel) believed to be recoverable, who were lost in
conflicts from World War II to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account
for DoD personnel still missing and unaccounted-for while serving our
country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at
www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call (703) 699-1169/1193/1420.
# # #

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 9 October, 2018 10:24
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Minnesota Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday, accounted for on July 12, 2018, will be

buried October 15 in Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minnesota.

 

Holliday, 22, of Minneapolis, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His family does not wish to speak with media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Holliday on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1950, Holliday was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th

Cavalry Regiment, 7th Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions

against the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of

South Pyongan Province, North Korea.  Holliday was killed in action on Nov.

30, 1950 and was reportedly buried in the United Nations Military Cemetery

(UNMC) Pyongyang.  As the United Nations' situation with North Korea

worsened, circumstances forced the closure of UNMC Pyongyang on Dec. 3,

1950, and buried remains could not be recovered.

 

Following the war, during an operation known as "Operation Glory," UN forces

returned approximately 14,000 sets of remains to the Chinese and North

Koreans, and received more than 4,000 sets of remains from isolated burials,

prisoner of war camp cemeteries and temporary UN cemeteries, including UNMC

Pyongyang.  The received remains were turned over to the Central

Identification Unit in Kokura, Japan.

 

None of the returned remains could be associated with Holliday's, and all

unidentified remains, including a set designated "X-16970 OPGLORY" were

interred as Korean War unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

On April 19, 2018, DPAA disinterred "X-16970 OPGLORY" from the Punchbowl and

sent the remains to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Holliday's remains, scientists from DPAA used dental,

anthropological, and chest radiograph comparison analysis which; as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,677 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Holliday's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the other MIAs from the Korean War.  A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Holliday's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004nSaEAI

10/06/18

 
On June 15, 2015, Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency personnel began re-exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for ...
 
Family members of those MIA still suffer ... Recovery Network, a private sector group of historians that works with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
10/05/18

 
... attacked Pearl Harbor will be buried with full military honors in his hometown on Oct. 12, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
The remains of a Linn County veteran who died during the attack on Pearl Harbor are coming home to Laclede. Through the work of the POW/MIA ...
 
According to the release, in 2015, the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the ...
10/04/18

 
After work by the POW/MIA Accounting Agency and DNA Analysis, his remains are coming home to Iowa. Brown, who died at age 24, was originally ...

 

 
After research and historical analysis, historians from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) determined Anderson was a strong candidate ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 October, 2018 12:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Nebraska Soldier Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. Melvin C. Anderson, accounted for on April 30, 2018, will be

buried October 12 in his hometown.

 

Anderson, 31, of Omaha, Nebraska, was killed during World War II.

 

His niece, Joani R. McGinnis, of Shenandoah, Iowa, is available for

interviews at (712) 215-1770.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photos of Anderson on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In November 1944, Anderson was a member of Company C, 803rd Tank Destroyer

Battalion, participating in intense fighting in the Hürtgen Forest.  His

company was deployed as direct fire support for American infantrymen

attacking the town of Grosshau.  Two tank destroyers and six tanks,

including the M10 tank destroyer Anderson was the tank commander on, were

knocked out in the fighting around Grosshau on Nov. 25, 1944.  He was killed

during the battle, though his status was initially listed as missing in

action.  On Dec. 21, 1944, his status was amended to killed in action.

 

In 1947, an American investigation team found remains inside the remnants of

an America tank destroyer near Grosshau.  The remains were later designated

X-6852 Neuville.  Due to the condition of the remains, they were declared

unidentifiable and were interred at United States Military Cemetery

Draguignan, France, today’s Rhone American Cemetery.

 

After thorough research and historical analysis, historians from DPAA

determined Anderson was a strong candidate for association to the remains.

In June 2017, X-6852 Neuville was disinterred and sent to DPAA.

 

To identify Anderson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,910 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Anderson’s name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American

Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the

other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an "unknown" his grave was

meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle

Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 October, 2018 12:30
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Missouri USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Natale I. Torti, accounted for on April 26, 2018, will

be buried October 12 in Jefferson Barracks, Missouri.

 

Torti, 19, of St. Louis, Missouri, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His nephew, Joseph P. Torti, Jr., of St. Louis, is available for interviews

at (314) 487-9189.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Torti on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Torti was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Torti. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Torti.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for identification.

 

To identify Torti's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,810 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Torti's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Torti's personal profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0nEAC

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 October, 2018 12:20
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Tennessee USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 2nd Class William V. Campbell, accounted for on May 9, 2018,

will be buried October 10 in his hometown.

 

Campbell, 20, of Elizabethton, Tennessee, was killed during the attack on

the USS Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His brother, Gene Campbell, of Greenville, South Carolina, is available for

interviews at (864) 616-6397.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Campbell on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Campbell was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Campbell. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Campbell.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for identification.

 

To identify Campbell's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,810 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Campbell's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Campbell's personal profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKdEAK

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 3 October, 2018 12:21
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Missouri USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Harold L. Head, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will

be buried October 10 in Laclede, Missouri.

 

Head, 20, of Browning, Missouri, was killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Head on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Head was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at

Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly

capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,

including Head. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Head.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for

analysis.

 

To identify Head's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,810 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Head's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

10/03/18
 
... Globemaster, and later that month, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and Joint Task Force team conducted a recovery operation at the site.
 
 
The remains were repatriated in early 2018 from North Korea, flown to Hawaii's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency for DNA identification and, ...
10/02/18

BELL TOLLING EVENT

Nationwide bell tolling at 11 a.m. Nov. 11 will honor the 116,516 American men and women who died in World War I. Bells will be rung in places of worship, schools, town halls, public carillons and cemeteries to mark the centennial of the armistice that ended hostilities in what Americans fervently hoped had been “The War to End All Wars.”


https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaFamWeb

The "FamWeb" is an online space for sharing general information with families of missing personnel, such as case synopses and battlefield summaries. As always, family members of missing personnel should stay in contact with their designated casualty officer to get specific details on their missing loved ones and the government's efforts to account for them. If you do not know your casualty office, the following link provides a list of each one: http://www.dpaa.mil/Families/Contact-Information.


 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which makes announcements that remains have been identified, did so for Streetman on Sept. 6. It says ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 1 October, 2018 10:54
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Connecticut USS Oklahoma Sailor To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Water Tender 1st Class Stephen Pepe, accounted for on March 19, 2018,

will be buried October 8 in Bourne, Massachusetts.

 

Pepe, 43, of Bridgeport, Connecticut, was killed during the attack on the

USS Oklahoma in World War II.

 

His niece, Barbara Kovacs, of Plainville, Massachusetts, is available for

interviews at (508) 361-4040.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Pepe on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pepe was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Pepe. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Pepe.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Pepe's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as material and circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,813 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Pepe's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Pepe's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XhSLEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 September, 2018 11:02
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Minnesota Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Sgt. Eugene W. Yost, accounted for on March 28, 2018, will be buried

October 5 in Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minnesota.

 

Yost, 18, of Milaca, Minnesota, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His sister, Elise Ditslear, of Lake Havasu City, Arizona, is available for

interviews at (928) 451-1087.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Yost on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In September 1950, Yost was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th

Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.  Yost's regiment was responsible for

defending the road from Sanju to Taegu in South Korea, and positioned

themselves in bordering hills.  On September 2, the unit received

information that the 19th Regiment North Korea People's Army would attack in

the evening.  During the night, the North Koreans overran the cavalry's

positions.  Yost was last seen on Sept. 3, 1950, and was reported missing in

action when he could not be accounted for. 

 

In March 1951, remains were found in the vicinity of Tongmyongwon, South

Korea, in an area that corresponded with where Yost's regiment fought.  The

remains, designated Unknown X-742 Tanggok, were unable to be identified and

were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the

Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

On June 12, 2017, Unknown X-742 Tanggok was disinterred from the Punchbowl

and sent to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Leonard's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their assistance

in this recovery.

 

Today, 7,686 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Yost's name is recorded at the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-14201/1169.

 

Yost's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000cdbTEAQ

 
09/26/18
 
... agency like JPAC/DPAA (Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command / Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency) that looks for them. I just started a nonprofit ...
 
“Today remains without a doubt one of America's most committed vigils – the repatriation of our POW and MIA service members,” Ketchum said.
09/25/18
Not Just a Hike: Mountain Climb Helps Gold Star Families Heal
 
Jack Merrill's vision is virtually gone, but he still sees things from a long time ago. Horrible things. Painful things. Historic things. He was a prisoner of ...
 
A Letter to the Mama with the Gold Star
09/24/18

 
Living through 68 years of uncertainty, he told those assembled for a National POW/MIA Recogtion Day ceremony at the National Memorial Ceremony ...
09/23/18



 https://www.facebook.com/groups/ridehome

Andersonville/Macon/Warner Robbins =  The Ride Home 2018 - 1 Gold Star, 30 POW/MIA families, 57 former POWs, 20 widows of  ex-POWs for 3 days of Tribute.


 

 
PALM SPRINGS, Calif.- - People all over the country gathered to recognize prisoners of war and those missing in action. The Palm Springs Air ...
 
Sons of a fallen soldier whose remains were recently returned by North Korea attend a POW/MIA commemoration at Punchbowl. Read More ...
 
According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, more than 82,000 Americans remain missing from WWII, the Korean War, Vietnam War, Cold ...
09/22/18
 
Today marks the observance of National POW/MIA Recognition Day. It's a day our nation sets aside to remember those who were prisoners of war and ...
 
 
A group of students at (then) San Fernando Valley State College are credited with creating POW awareness bracelets after hearing a story about a ...
09/21/18
 
In honor of POW/MIA Recognition Day on September 21, Multimedia Journalist Jillian Angeline went to a DPAA family member update in Philadelphia ...
 
 
I had no clue,” said Butler, one of the longest-held POWs in U.S. history, ... the Tulsa World in advance of National POW/MIA Recognition Day Friday.
 
Closer to home and according to the Defense POW/MIA Accountability Agency, almost 1,000 Oregon veterans remain MIA: 21 WWI, 885 WWII, ...
 
... are typically announced in formal news releases from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which is in charge of searching for missing troops.
 
Friday, Sept. 21, is National POW/MIA Day. Many Americans across the United States pause to remember the sacrifices and service of those who were ...
09/20/18
 
Shortly before the president tweeted, Kelly McKeague, the director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) told reporters two of the 55 ...
 
Master Sergeant Chinn is a well-decorated soldier with more than 18 medals including the silver star which he earned during WWII when he ...
09/19/18

 
Unity is something the Warner Robins Police Department showed people during a dedication to POW/MIA. James Sehorn says he's grateful to be back ...
09/18/18
 
Rodney Chinn said his father received numerous military recognitions, including the Silver Star for saving the lives of six wounded soldiers.
 
 
He received the Silver Star and Bronze Star for his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, and was credited with liberating the Gunskirchen Nazi ...
09/17/18
 
He was recently notified that his father's remains had been identified through DNA and anthropological testing by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
On recognizing the need for a symbol of the country's POW/MIAs, the National League of POW/MIA Families was instrumental in designing a flag to ...
09/16/18
 
So far, researchers with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency have identified the remains of nearly 200 servicemen who died in the surprise ...
 
When Ann Mills-Griffiths sent out her regular National League of POW/MIA Families newsletter this month, she included an announcement that Navy ...
https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2018/09/15/harold-demoss-navy-wwii-after-70-years-fallen-soldier-finally-returns-home-nashville/1221865002/


After 70 years, a fallen soldier finally home

Anita Wadhwani

Nashville Tennessean USA TODAY NETWORK - TENNESSEE
 

At exactly 9:51 a.m. the Delta Airlines flight carrying the remains of the late WWII fighter pilot, Harold DeMoss, touched the ground, draped in an American flag and ushered off the tarmac into a waiting hearse by six Navy personnel wearing their dress whites.

It has been more than 70 years since the 21-year-old Navy Ensign — who left Nashville to join the Navy as a teen, never to return — crashed his plane in a remote outcrop on the Hawaiian island of Oahu....

Yet for all those years, DeMoss’s remains have lain where his plane went down on American soil — just 40 miles from the offices of the Pentagon agency charged with retrieving the remains of all fallen soldiers.

The failures of the agency — now called Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency — to bring home some 83,000 fallen soldiers from wars past has devastated thousands of families and drawn withering criticism from Congress....

Sept. 15, 1993: Kathy Borah Duez of LeRoy and other POW-MIA activists will move their protest and month-long fast to Washington. Her brother was shot down over Laos and may be a prisoner in Vietnam. They are upset at President Clinton’s lifting of the trade embargo against Vietnam.

09/15/18
 
A full military memorial service will be held for Master Sergeant Leonard Kelsey Chinn at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Methodist Church in ...
 
15, 1993: Kathy Borah Duez of LeRoy and other POW-MIA activists will move their protest and month-long fast to Washington. Her brother was shot ...
 
... had been identified through an intricate sequence of DNA and anthropological analyses completed by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency identified the sailor Tuesday as Navy Seaman 1st Class James W. Holzhauer, 23. No hometown was listed ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 September, 2018 09:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Indiana Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Cpl. Morris Meshulam, accounted for on June 4, will be buried September

23 in his hometown.

 

Meshulam, 19, of Indianapolis, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His nephew, Sam Goldstein, is available for interviews at (317) 850-0726.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Meshulam on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

 

In late November 1950, Meshulam was a member of Battery D, 82nd

Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons,) 2nd Infantry

Division.  The Division suffered heavy losses to units of the Chinese

People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) between the towns of Kunu-ri and Sunchon,

North Korea.  Meshulam was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950. 

 

In February 1951, a prisoner of war returned by the CPVF reported that

Meshulam died of cold weather injuries in early January 1951, but could not

give a location to where Meshulam's remains were located.

 

In July 1951, a Korean farmer led a U.S. Army recovery team to a grave in a

field that contained the remains of a U.S. Soldier.  The recovered remains

were sent to the Tanggok United Nations Memorial Cemetery for possible

identification.  The remains, designated Unknown X-1596 were declared

unidentifiable and buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific,

known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In June 2016, DPAA disinterred Unknown X-1596 from the Punchbowl and sent

the remains to the lab for identification.

 

To identify Meshulam's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Meshulam's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with others who are missing from the

Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Meshulam's personnel profile can be found at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000009cBfvEAE

 

From: Bill Fortier <bfortier@usamedia.tv>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 7:40 am
Subject: PLEASE PASS INFO...CA Marine Accounted For From KOREAN WAR To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 
CALIFORNIA MARINE CORPS PFC. ROGER GONZALES TO BE BURIED ON Friday,SEP 21, 2018,
 “NATIONAL POW/MIA RECOGNITION DAY” IN RANCHO PALOS VERDES, CA

 
Please pass the word to groups or individuals in the area who might be interested in showing support
for a fallen warrior from the Korean War who has been returned home for burial.

 

 
MARINE CORPS PRIVATE FIRST CLASS ROGER GONZALES 

 
Service Location:
 
MEMORIAL DAY SITE

Service Time:
 
Friday Sep 21 2018 (National POW/MIA Recognition Day)
10:00 AM 

Concludes At:
 
Green Hills Memorial Park
27501 South Western Avenue
Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 
https://greenhillsmemorial.com/service-details/?sid=40739

 

Phone: 310-521-4333

 
Section: Vista Grande
Lot: 443
 
Grave: C

 
Best to all,

 
Bill
 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 14 September, 2018 09:14
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: California Marine Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales, accounted for on June 4, will be buried

September 21 in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.

 

Gonzales, 20, of San Pedro, California, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His sister, Erminia Salceda, is available for interviews at 310-833-0592.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Gonzales on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late November, 1950, Gonzales was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion,

7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division.  The U.S. X Corps began earnest

operations in the northeast of the Korean Peninsula against enemy units of

the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPFV), which were thought to be

soldiers of the Korean People's Army (KPA).  The X Corps began its

offensive, spearheaded by the 1st Marine Division and the U.S. Army's 31st

Regimental Combat Team, in the area of the Chosin Reservoir.  On Nov. 27,

1950, Gonzales' unit moved northwest from Hagru-ri to Fox Hill at the

Toktong Pass.  In the early hours of November 28, the CPVF attacked and

Gonzales' company sustained heavy casualties.  Gonzales was reported to have

been killed in action on Nov. 29, 1950, and was buried at the base of Fox

Hill.

 

On Sept. 10, 1954, the KPA returned a shipment of 25 sets of remains that

had reportedly been recovered from the west side of the Chosin Reservoir.

The remains were shipped to the Central Identification Unit Kokura in Japan,

for identification.  One set of remains, designated X-15010 was declared

unidentifiable and was interred as an "Unknown" in the National Memorial

Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In June 2016, after further analysis of historical and biological

information relating to X-15010 DPAA disinterred the unknown X-file from the

Punchbowl and sent the remains to the lab for identification.

 

To identify Gonzales' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), DNA analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

material and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Gonzales' name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Gonzales' personal profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000001ZlGYEA0

 


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Kansas POW/MIA
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2018 20:57:46 -0400
From: Ray Calore <rayjcee@aol.com>
To: info@pownetwork.org


 
From Ray Calore:

 
Hi Mary!  I put together some info and pics to update you on what's been happening in Kansas on POW/MIA activities.  First thing is that our past SEVEN governors have signed a POW/MIA Recognition for the state, beginning in the late 1980's:

 
Gov. Mike Hayden -- 1987-91
Gov. Joan Finney ---  1991-95
Gov. Bill Graves -----  1995-2003
Gov. Kathleen Sebelius -- 2003-2009
Gov. Mark Parkinson ----- 2009-2011
Gov. Sam Brownback ---- 2011-2018
Gov. Jeff Colyer -- 2018 to present.

 
That's each year for each governor since 1988.

 
Notice that the current proclamation, which was signed on Aug. 24, 2018 (picture attached),  designates Kansas POW/MIA Recognition WEEK along with National POW/MIA Day.  It's been that way since the beginning, and I update the proclamation every year. There might be other states that do that, but I don't know. 

 
For each signing ceremony, they allow me to invite up to ten other folks to attend. (I usually go over by a few so I can include as many organizations as possible.)  Some of the photos are attached.  Not many.

 
There's a lot more, as you can imagine.  Just want to make sure our state gets its due.  And we all thank you for a lot of your inspiration and work.

 
That's all for now, Mary.  Keep in touch !

 
-- Ray (913) 787-0226

 

09/13/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday it had identified the remains of the young man from Monona. Since the announcement ..
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Bennett's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the cemetery. A rosette will be placed next ...
 
A POW/MIA convocation will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday in the GSW Storm Dome. The public is invited to this free program, where Camp ...
 
 
... in November 1943 on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 September, 2018 09:05
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Ohio Sailor Accounted For From USS Oklahoma To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Navy Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders, accounted for on March 26, will

be buried September 19 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in

Honolulu.

 

Sanders, 38, of Lima, Ohio, was killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma

in World War II.

 

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

 

The Department of Defense has no photos of Sanders on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Sanders was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Sanders. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Sanders.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for identification.

 

To identify Sanders' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which

matched his family, anthropological analysis, which matched his records,

along with circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,823 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Sanders' name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Sanders' personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0gEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 12 September, 2018 09:06
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Idaho Soldier Accounted For From Korean War To Be Buried With Full Military Honors

 

Dear Editor,

 

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, accounted for on July 12, will be buried

September 19 in Silver Creek, Nebraska.

 

Chinn, 34, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was killed during the Korean War.

 

His son, Rodney Chinn, of Columbus, Nebraska, is available for interviews at

(402) 563-4322.

 

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Chinn on file.

 

For more information, contact:

              

               SFC Kristen Duus

               Chief of External Communications

               Public Affairs NCOIC- D.C. Directorate

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

               2300 Defense Pentagon

               Washington, D.C 20301-2300

               (703) 699-1420

               Kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil

              

               OR:

              

               Chuck Prichard, APR

               Director, Public Affairs

               Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)

               (703) 699-1169

               charles.l.prichard.civ@mail.mil

 

/////

 

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat

Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent

Chinese attacks in North Korea.  Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy

forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war

camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea. 

 

Several repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Chinn died April

5, 1941 in Camp 5.

 

On Dec. 14, 1993, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 33 boxes of remains of

servicemen who had died during the Korean War. North Korean documents,

turned over with some of the boxes, indicated that some of the remains were

recovered from the vicinity where POWs from Chinn's unit were believed to

have died.

 

To identify Chinn's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and

autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis, and

circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People's

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,683 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Chinn's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt00000004lh3EAA

 
09/11/18
 
However, according to director of scientific analysis at the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, John Byrd among the undergoing remains ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says Pfc. Leonard A. Tyma's remains were identified using dental, anthropological and chest radiograph ...
 
5, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Gross was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor ...
 
Gross was one of 429 men killed on board the ship when it capsized, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). Gross' remains ...
 
Bishop Bill Would Give Full Arlington Privileges To Enlisted POW and ... National League of POW/ MIA Families, Special Operations Association, ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency identified the sailor in a news release Tuesday as 23-year-old Navy Seaman 1st Class James W.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday that the remains of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood have been ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 11:17
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Oklahoma Soldier Accounted-For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Tech. Sgt. Robert J. Fitzgerrell.  Fitzgerrell,

32, born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was accounted for on September 4.

 

In January 1945, Fitzgerrell was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 311th

Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division.  On Jan. 30, 1945, while engaged

in an attack against enemy forces near Huppenbroich, Germany, Fitzgerrell

stepped on an anti-personnel mine and was killed.  His remains were not

identified by American forces after the battle.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command traveled to

Huppenbroich and extensively searched the Hürtgen Forest, to locate

Fitzgerrell’s remains.  Unable to make a correlation with any remains found

in the area, he was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 15, 1951. 

 

In 2016, a historian from DPAA analyzed documentation of X-6998 Neuville, an

unidentified set of remains recovered from a shallow burial near

Huppenbroich in 1947.  The remains, unable to be identified in 1947, were

subsequently interred at Neuville, present-day Ardennes American Cemetery in

Belgium. 

 

Based upon the original recovery location and evidence from the personal

effects associated with X-6998, the DPAA historian determined that there was

a possible association between the remains and Fitzgerrell.  Following a

comparison of the X-6998 skeletal documentation to Fitzgerrell’s physical

characteristics, a DPAA anthropologist concurred, and DPAA officials

recommended disinterment.  In June 2017, the Department of Defense and

American Battle Monuments Commission disinterred X-6998 and accessioned the

remains to the laboratory for identification

 

To identify Fitzgerrell’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, as well as anthropological analysis, and circumstantial

and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful the American Battle Monuments Commission for their

partnership in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Fitzgerrell’s name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Hombourg,

Belgium, an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the other

MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown, Fitzgerrell’s grave was

meticulously cared for by ABMC for 70 years.  A rosette will be placed next

to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 08:36
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Washington USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

Sir/Ma'am,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Radioman 3rd Class Bruce H. Ellison.  Ellison,

21, born in Poulsbo, Washington, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ellison was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Ellison. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Ellison.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Ellison's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Ellison's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Ellison's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeLEEA0

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 11 September, 2018 08:29
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Virginia USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class James W. Holzhauer.  Holzhauer,

23, of Virginia, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Holzhauer was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma,

which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Holzhauer. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Holzhauer.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Holzhauer's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Holzhauer's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Holzhauer's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeLqEAK

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject:   FW: Full Military Honors Act of 2018 H.R. 6734
Date:   Tue, 11 Sep 2018 08:57:09 -0400
From:   moehog@verizon.net
To:   moehog@verizon.net

 

Good Tuesday Morning!

 

We believe that most of us can/will agree with the statement ‘all men are created equal’ but we also understand that in life, order is necessary to avoid chaos. In the Armed Services and specifically in a combat situation this ‘order’ is a must and its use is a proven life saver. But when should ‘rank/order’ cease to be a measurement of ones life’s accomplishments?

 

Are you aware of the fact that a Sargent or a Private First Class who is captured by the enemy, held against his/her will (POW), repatriated and upon their death is not entitled to the same funeral service that an Officer who had also been a POW? The Officer would be entitled to ‘Full Military Honors’ Funeral Service while the Enlisted person would be entitled to a ‘Funeral Service’.

 

Personally, I agree with Representative Sam Johnson (TX), who was a Prisoner of War (16 April 1966-12 February 1973). His statement in a recent press release announcing the introduction of ‘Full Military Honors Act of 2018’ is copied  in part below:

 

“During my time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton, many of my fellow POWs and I were isolated in cramped cells,” said Rep. Johnson. “We spent months in leg irons, years in leg stocks, and endured extreme starvation and torture. My fellow POWs who served honorably demonstrated the utmost patriotism, but not all of them were eligible for full military honors at their burial, simply due to their rank. I believe this is wrong. ANY veteran who served honorably as a Prisoner of War or whose actions earned them the Medal of Honor has already demonstrated extraordinary dedication to defending Freedom. In return, they deserve to have the country they fought for bestow full military honors if they are eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

If you agree with Representative Johnson thoughts we hope you will contact your Representative  and request they become a Co-Sponsor on this Act, H.R. 6734.

Not sure how to get in touch with your Representative – try this link - https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative

This Bill was brought to the Floor on 7 September and referred to the House Committee on Armed Services - https://armedservices.house.gov/about/members. Is your Representative on this Committee?

 

Time is of the essence! Only a few months until this Congressional session ends. Pro-Active is best.

Being a part of the Solution can be very rewarding!

 

If we can be of any help – just contact us via this email – moehog@verizon.net or our cell – 407 448 1181

 

This is a copy of the Media Release from Rep. Bishop’s Office:


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Annalyse Beaver

Sep 10, 2018

202-805-5619

 


 

  Reps. Bishop, Johnson and Walz Introduce Full Military Honors Act  

WASHINGTON – Congressmen Mike Bishop (MI-08), Sam Johnson (TX-03), and House Veterans’ Affairs Committee Ranking Member Tim Walz (MN-01) today announced the introduction of the bipartisan Full Military Honors Act of 2018 (H.R. 6734) to allow enlisted Medal of Honor recipients and Prisoners of War (POW) who are eligible for burial at Arlington National Cemetery to receive a full military honors burial, which includes an escort platoon, a military band, and a caisson (horse drawn casket) if available. Currently, full military honors are reserved for commissioned officers, warrant officers, and senior non-commissioned officers.

“America’s POWs and Medal of Honor recipients have sacrificed immeasurably in service to the United States – regardless of their rank. So I was shocked to find out that earlier this year a former POW from Michigan, Army Pvt. 1st Class Robert Fletcher was denied a full honors burial at Arlington National Cemetery based solely on his enlisted rank,” said Rep. Bishop. “This has been an issue for too long, and my legislation will ensure those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty are provided the full military honors they have earned for their end of life ceremonies.”

“During my time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton, many of my fellow POWs and I were isolated in cramped cells,” said Rep. Johnson. “We spent months in leg irons, years in leg stocks, and endured extreme starvation and torture. My fellow POWs who served honorably demonstrated the utmost patriotism, but not all of them were eligible for full military honors at their burial, simply due to their rank. I believe this is wrong. ANY veteran who served honorably as a Prisoner of War or whose actions earned them the Medal of Honor has already demonstrated extraordinary dedication to defending Freedom. In return, they deserve to have the country they fought for bestow full military honors if they are eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. I am grateful for Rep. Mike Bishop’s leadership on this issue, and I’m proud to join him in standing up for the service and sacrifice of our Great Nation’s veterans.”  

“Medal of Honor recipients and POWs have earned and deserve nothing less than full military honors,” said Rep. Walz. “As a retired enlisted soldier of 24 years, I’m proud to join in introducing the Full Military Honors Act. To help ensure we honor the sacrifices these heroes and their families have made for our country, we must pass it without delay.”

Congressman Sam Johnson, a 29-year U.S. Air Force veteran, flew combat missions in both the Korean and Vietnam Wars. On the 25th combat mission of his second tour in Vietnam, Johnson was shot down over North Vietnam and held as a POW for nearly seven years in the “Hanoi Hilton.” While there, his captors labeled him a “diehard” resistor and moved him into solitary confinement in “Alcatraz,” along with ten other POWs including U.S. Senator Jeremiah Denton and Vice Presidential candidate Jim Stockdale.

Congressman Tim Walz, a 24-year veteran of the Army National Guard, is the Ranking Member of the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs and serves on the US-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs. Walz is the highest ranking enlisted soldier ever to serve in Congress.

The Full Military Honors Act of 2018 is endorsed by the American Legion, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Military Officers Association of America, National League of POW/ MIA Families, Special Operations Association, Special Forces Association, and American Fallen Warriors Memorial Foundation. To read letters in support of H.R. 6734, click HERE.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 10 September, 2018 10:26
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Iowa USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Fireman 3rd Class Robert J. Bennett.  Bennett,

18, born in Monona, Iowa, was accounted for on August 13.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Bennett was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Bennett. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Bennett.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Bennett's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Bennett's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.


Bennett's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKKEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>

Sent: 10 September, 2018 10:26

To: Undisclosed recipients:

Subject: Arkansas USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been identified as those of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood.

Lockwood, 21, born in Smithton, Arkansas, was accounted for on July 3.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Lockwood was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Lockwood. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Lockwood.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

 

To identify Lockwood's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Lockwood's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Lockwood's personnel profile can be viewed at https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe00EAC

09/10/18

 
What happens to the POW/MIA monument located at the O'Hare oasis when workers tear down the glass pavilion overhanging the Tri-State Tollway?

 

 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says remains of Navy Reserve Ensign Harold P. DeMoss were accounted for in May and identified through ...

 

 
In coming weeks, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is expected to announce the first two identifications from 55 sets of remains turned over ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday that the remains of Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Clarence M. Lockwood have been ...
 
... was shot down on a mission to Zeitz, Germany on Aug. 16, 1944. Eight of nine crewmembers bailed out safely and were held as prisoners of war.
 
"The IDs will be made officially in the next couple of days," said John Byrd, the director of scientific analysis at the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
... been identified, and the U.S. military will be notifying their families within days, directors for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday.
 
... members among the 55 boxes returned by North Korea this summer, officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accountability Agency said Monday.
09/09/18
 
The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified. The Defense ...
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - The remains of an Illinois native shot down over Germany 74 years ago during World War II have been identified.
09/08/18
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Friday the remains of Water Tender 2nd Class Edgar D. Gross of Athens have been positive ...
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So it does appear that these were all buried together at one point in time," says Greg Berg from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
 
To identify his remains, scientists from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used material and circumstantial evidence. He will be laid to rest in ...
 
The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Sept. 4 that 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk's remains were identified last month using DNA ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Illinois USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class Earl P. Baum.  Baum, 19, born

in Chicago, was accounted for on August 23.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Baum was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Baum. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Baum.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Baum's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72, 866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Baum's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Baum's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XeKHEA0

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:52
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Nebraska USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class Joseph K. Maule.  Maule, 18,

born in Bloomfield, Nebraska, was accounted for on August 8.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Maule was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Maule. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Maule.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Maule's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR)

DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial

evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Maule's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

 

Maule's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe08EAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 13:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Georgia Soldier Accounted For From The Korean War

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been

identified as those of Army Sgt. 1st Class James S. Streetman, Jr.

Streetman, 23, born in Columbus, Georgia, was accounted for on August 31.

 

In July 1950, Streetman was a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment,

24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th ID's Kum

River Line against the Korean People's Army (KPA), near the town of Taejon,

South Korea. The KPA outmaneuvered and overwhelmed Streetman's regiment,

forcing units into a fighting withdrawal through enemy lines. Streetman was

initially reported to have been killed in action on Aug. 14, 1950, however

historical records determined he had been killed July 22, 1950.

 

After the war, the American Graves Registration Services (AGRS) processed

remains from South Korean battlefields for possible identification. Remains

that could not be identified were buried as "Unknowns" in the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

Because no remains could be associated with Streetman, he was declared

non-recoverable.

 

On Oct. 6, 1950, unidentified remains recovered from north of Taejon

designated as Unknown X-162, were interred by the U.S. Army in the former

American Cemetery No. 1, renamed to United States Military Cemetery Taejon.

After attempts to identify the remains were unsuccessful, Unknown X-162 were

declared unidentifiable and were subsequently interred at the National

Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

In 2017, ten sets of remains were disinterred from NMCP, including Unknown

X-162, and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Streetman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Today, 7,686 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams. Streetman's name is recorded on the Courts

of the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu along with the others who are missing

from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate

he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.                                                                   

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 6 September, 2018 07:39
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Wisconsin USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 1st Class George E. Naegle.  Nagle, 22,

born in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, was accounted for on August 27.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Naegle was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Naegle. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Naegle.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Naegle's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Naegle's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.dpaa.mil/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Naegle's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xe0KEAS

 

09/06/18
 
“All they have to do is furnish the table.” The AMVETS will host a formal MIA/POW ceremony at the post, 423 Trenton Ave., at about 5 p.m. Sept. 21.
 
Being left with so many unanswered questions, the suffering continues for America's POW and MIA families long after a loved one's fate has been ...
 
 
There are 190 service members who remain unaccounted for from North Carolina alone, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Wednesday that Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John D. Crouchley Jr. of Providence was identified ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency exhumed the remains of Navy Seaman 1st Class George Naegle, of La Crosse, from the National ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 September, 2018 14:47
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Illinois Airman Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Herbert W. Harms.  Harms,

28, born in Rutland, Illinois, was accounted for on August 31.

 

In August 1944, Harms served as a B-17 tail gunner with the 569th

Bombardment Squadron, 390th Bombardment Group, 13th Combat Bombardment Wing,

3rd Air Division, 8th Air Force.  On Aug. 16, 1944, Harms' aircraft was

struck by anti-aircraft artillery during a bombardment mission to Zeitz,

Germany.  The aircraft crashed just outside the village of Cauerwitz,

Germany.  Eight of the nine crewmembers of the "Dottie III/Green Banana"

safely bailed out of the aircraft, were captured and held as prisoners of

war before being returned to duty.  None of the surviving crewmembers

reported seeing Harms leave the aircraft, though most believed he jumped

before the crash.  A German report listed Harms as having died in the crash.

 

In June 1947, American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) personnel

disinterred the remains of one unknown American from a corner of the

civilian cemetery in Thierbach, Germany.  According to the Narrative of

Investigation, the AGRC team had learned from the cemetery caretaker that a

plane had crashed and local residents had found remains.  Following the

exhumation, the remains, which could not be identified, were buried at U.S.

Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium, as X-5882 Neuville.  In

1948, the remains were disinterred for reprocessing, and were again declared

unidentifiable.  They were subsequently reburied.

 

In September 1947, an AGRC team visited Cauerwitz, Saxony-Anhalt to

investigate Harms' loss.  The team examined the crash site with the local

Burgermeister (mayor) who told investigators that the aircraft had come from

the direction of Zeitz and some crewmembers parachuted from the aircraft.

The team did not learn about any burials of American casualties in nearby

towns.  The AGRC compared previously collected X-file remains to Harms'

medical records, but a positive match could not be made.  Based on a lack of

information regarding the location of Harms' remains, he was declared

non-recoverable on May 10, 1950.

 

In 2016, based on a request from independent researcher Mr. Christopher

Unitt, a DPAA historian reviewed documents of remains recovered from the

area near Thierbach, including X-5882 Neuville.  Historical documents

indicated that Harms was likely associated with X-5882.

 

Based on the historical analysis, X-5882 was recommended for disinterment.

On Sept. 5, 2017, a team from U.S. Army Regional Mortuary-Europe/Africa

exhumed the remains from Neuville American Cemetery and accessioned the

remains to the laboratory for identification.

 

To identify Harms' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis,

anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the German government, U.S. Army Regional Mortuary

Europe/Africa, the American Battle Monuments Commission and Mr. Christopher

Unitt for their partnerships in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Harms' name is recorded on the Tablets

of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium, along with the others

missing from WWII.  Although interred as an unknown, Harms' grave was

meticulously cared-for for more than 70 years by ABMC.  A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 5 September, 2018 14:50
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Rhode Island Airman Accounted For From World War II

 

Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II, have been

identified as those of Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John D. Crouchley, Jr.

Crouchley, 26, born in Providence, Rhode Island, was accounted for on August

31.

 

In June 1944, Crouchley served as a pilot with the 828th Bombardment

Squadron, 485th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force.  On June 28, 1944,

Crouchley was lost when his B-24H aircraft was shot down and crashed during

a combat mission over Romania.  The nine crewmembers of aircraft parachuted

safely, were captured as prisoners of war in Belgium, and subsequently

returned to duty.  Only Crouchley remained unaccounted for.  Because the

crash occurred in enemy territory, American personnel were not able to

conduct an immediate search, and Bulgaria provided no evidence that his

remains were recovered or buried.  Based on no further information of his

status, he was declared deceased as of June 29, 1945.

 

Following the close of hostilities, the American Graves Registration Command

(AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who

were killed in battle.  Investigators compared Crouchley's medical

information to unidentified remains recovered in Bulgaria, but a positive

match could not be made.  On July 2, 1948, Crouchley's remains were declared

non-recoverable.

 

In 2010, an investigation team of analysts from the Defense POW/Missing

Personnel Office and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (both predecessors

of DPAA) conducted a site survey of the alleged crash site and interviewed

potential witnesses.  The site was consistent with the historical loss

records, as well as eyewitness accounts.  The team recovered weaponry

bearing the serial number that correlated with Crouchley's aircraft.

 

From July to September 2017, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site,

overlooking the village of Churen.  The team recovered possible osseous

remains and material evidence.  The remains were accessioned to the

laboratory for analysis.

 

To identify Crouchley's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to Col. Stanimir Stanev, Bulgarian Army, Retired and the

Bulgarian Government for their partnership in this recovery.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II.  Crouchley's name is recorded on the

Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle

Monuments Commission site in Impruenta, Italy, along with others missing

from WWII.  A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has

been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

09/04/18
 
First Lt. Herman L. Falk of Manhattan was just 22 when he died in a North Korean prisoner of war camp, according to the Defense POW/MIA ...
 
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that Marine Corps Sgt. Millard Odom from Batesville, Arkansas, was officially ...
 
 
The remains of a Marine from Colorado have been identified nearly 80 years after he was killed at Pearl Harbor. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that Pfc. Alva J. Cremean, who served on the U.S.S. Oklahoma, was accounted for as ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 September, 2018 13:18
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas Marine Accounted For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Marine Corps Sgt. Millard Odom.  Odom, 26, born in

Batesville, Arkansas, was accounted for on August 20.

 

In November 1943, Odom was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd

Marines, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff

Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the

Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of

intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were

killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually

annihilated. Odom died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943, during

the first waves of the assault.

 

The battle of Tarawa was a significant victory for the U.S. military because

the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from

which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance

their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

 

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members

who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on

the island.  Odom was reportedly buried in Cemetery #33. The 604th

Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery

operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Odom's remains were not

identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield

Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947.  By

1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National

Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu.

              

On Feb. 27, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-273 from the NMCP, and

sent the remains to the laboratory.

 

To identify Odom's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, dental,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 service members

(approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still

unaccounted for from World War II. Odom's name is recorded on the Tablets of

the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others killed or lost in WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted

for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Marine Corps Service

Casualty office at (800) 847-1597.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at

www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Odom's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000E0tn7EAB

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 4 September, 2018 13:13
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: New York Soldier Accounted For From The Korean War

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been

identified as those of Army 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk.  Falk, 22, of New York,

New York, was accounted for on August 14.

 

In February 1951, Falk was a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment,

2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against

units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an the vicinity of

Changbong-ni, South Korea.  Falk, and half of his platoon, were reported

missing in action on Feb. 12, 1951.

 

Following the war, returning American prisoners of war reported that Falk

died in either April or  May of 1951, while being held as a prisoner of war

at the Suan Bean Camp in North Korea.

 

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes

of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the

remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who died during the war. First

Lieutenant Falk's remains were included in this turnover

 

To identify Falk's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA

(Y-STR) analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as

circumstantial and material evidence.

 

DPAA remains fully prepared to resume recovery operations in the Democratic

Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the

commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and

recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

 

Today, 7,686 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using

modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that

were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North

Korea by American recovery teams.  Falk's name is recorded on the Courts of

the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,

along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Army Service Casualty

office at (800) 892-2490.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Falk's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000wynYBEAY

 


 
The Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Tuesday that 1st Lt. Herman L. Falk's remains were identified last month using ...
09/01/18
Schanberg investigated the work of the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs in 1991 and 1992, of which McCain was a member. In a lengthy ...

 
American officials made the claim during a May meeting of the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs, and experts say it could undermine the ...

 
08/31/18
 
 
Mueller died on May 3, 1951, unable to march farther north. On Aug. 4, 2017, Mueller's stepbrother Greg got a call from the POW/MIA Identification Lab ...
 
Presumed dead, the location of his body remained a mystery until the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency positively identified Duran's remains in ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 30 August, 2018 11:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Minnesota USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Radioman 3rd Class Dante S. Tini.  Tini,19, born

in Virginia, Minnesota, was accounted for on August 13.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tini was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was

moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Tini. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Tini.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Tini's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Tini's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along

with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to

his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA

website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa

or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Tini's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XgBlEAK

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 August, 2018 13:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: South Dakota USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of Navy Seaman 2nd Class Myron K. Lehman.  Lehman, 20,

born in Gann Valley, South Dakota, was accounted for on August 9.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Lehman was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Lehman. 

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Lehman.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Lehman's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis,

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Lehman's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Lehman's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XdzyEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 29 August, 2018 13:10
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Arkansas USS Oklahoma Sailor Accounted-For From World War II

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the

remains of a U.S. serviceman, killed during World War II have been

identified as those of  Navy Seaman 1st Class Richard L. Watson,  Watson,

20, born in Crossett, Arkansas, was accounted for on August 14.

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Watson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which

was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by

Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which

caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths

of 429 crewmen, including Watson.  

 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the

deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu

Cemeteries.

 

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.

personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves

Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from

the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification

Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to

confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in

Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not

be identified as non-recoverable, including Watson.

 

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum

directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On

June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl

for analysis.

 

To identify Watson's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces

Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and

anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. 

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000

died during the war.  Currently there are 72,866 (approximately 26,000 are

assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II.

Watson's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed

next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For information on funeral services, contact the Navy Service Casualty

office at (800) 443-9298.

 

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account

for missing Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the

DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420/1169.

 

Watson's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000Xg9VEAS

 

08/29/18
 
 
As it turns out, those addresses, and corresponding Internet links, all are listed on a single website maintained by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...
 
BAKERSFIELD, California (KBAK/KBFX) — Military officials with The Department of Defense's POW/MIA agency identified the remains of a Bakersfield ...

moe note; although this is a “Blast from the Past” from POW Network please note the original published date is August 2016.

Please remember, that just because a sitting President (Eisenhower, Nixon) say there are NO LIVE POWs being held against their Will – Does NOT make it so. Just because Communist Country Leadership says they have NO Americans in their possession after the signing of the peace treaty/armistice – Does NOT make it so.

In my opinion, they were 20,000 plus left behind at the end of WW II, 1,000 plus left behind after we pulled out of Korea and 300 plus left behind in Indochina after our departure in 1973

Remember the Mission – NOT FORGOTTEN – until they come home or are accounted for.

 

From: POW Network <info@pownetwork.org>
Sent: 24 August, 2018 20:40
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: Blast from the past


https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1657537/kim-jong-un-is-still-holding-elderly-british-and-american-prisoners-of-war-in-death-camps-sixty-years-after-korean-war-experts-claim/

CAGED IN KOREA 

Kim Jong-Un is still holding elderly British and American prisoners of war in death camps SIXTY years after Korean War, experts claim

CIA documents also suggest an unknown number of Western soldiers were abandoned at the end of the war

23rd August 2016,

Updated: 23rd August 2016,

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 11:42
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Marine Killed During World War II Accounted For (Schade, L.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Capt. Lester A. Schade, killed during World War II, was

accounted for on July 26.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614359/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-schade-l/

 

In April 1942, Schade, a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 4th Marine

Regiment, when he was captured by enemy forces and held as a prisoner of war

in the Philippine Islands. On Dec. 14, 1944, more than 1,600 Allied

prisoners were loaded aboard a Japanese transport en route to Japan. The in 1942

ship was attacked by American carrier planes, killing a number of American

prisoners. Survivors were transported aboard two other ships to Formosa,

present day Taiwan, where they were loaded onto another ship, Enoura Maru,

which was also attacked by American carrier planes. According to records

Schade was aboard the Enoura Maru when it was attacked Jan. 9, 1945, and was

listed as missing, presumed dead as a result of the incident.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Schade's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American

Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in the Philippines,

along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his

name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Schade's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt000000OlXjsEAF

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 10:37
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Tech Sgt Carlsen, USMC, Tarawa

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Marine Corps Reserve Tech Sgt. Harry A. Carlsen, killed during World War II,

was accounted for on June 4, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614262/
marine-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-carlsen-h/

 

In November 1943, Carlsen was assigned to Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor

Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against

stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll

of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several

days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors

were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were

virtually annihilated. Carlsen died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20,

1943, during the first waves of the assault.

 

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., and the Department of Veterans

Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Carlsen's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Carlsen's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000QrroEAC

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 08:55
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Jordan, W.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wesley V. Jordan, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 8, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614133/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-jordan-w/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Jordan was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Jordan.

 

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the

Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership

in this mission.

 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days

prior to scheduled funeral services.

 

Jordan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,

along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be

placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

For more information about DPAA, visit www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media

at www.facebook.com/dodpaa, or call 703-699-1420/1169.

 

Jordan's personnel profile can be viewed at

https://dpaa.secure.force.com/dpaaProfile?id=a0Jt0000000XdzgEAC

 

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SFC USARMY DPAA EC (US) <kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil>
Sent: 28 August, 2018 09:38
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed During World War II Accounted For (Shelden, E.)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

 

Navy Fire Controlman Edward J. Shelden, killed during the attack on the USS

Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 26, 2018.

http://www.dpaa.mil/News-Stories/Recent-News-Stories/Article/1614161/
uss-oklahoma-sailor-killed-during-world-war-ii-accounted-for-shelden-e/

 

On Dec. 7, 1941, Shelden was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored

at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese

aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it

to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429

crewmen, including Shelden.