WEBB, RONALD JOHN
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Name: Ronald John Webb
Rank/Branch: O3/United States Air Force
Unit: 390th TFS
Date of Birth: 29 August 1937
Home City of Record: Trenton NJ
Date of Loss: 11 June 1967
Country of Loss: North Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 212600 North  1061800 East
Status (in 1973): Returnee
Category:
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: F4C
Missions: 44
Other Personnel in Incident: Hervey Stockman, returnee
Source: Compiled by P.O.W. NETWORK from one or more of the following: raw
data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA
families, published sources, interviews. Updated 2000.
REMARKS: 730304 RELEASED BY DRV
================================
SOURCE: WE CAME HOME  copyright 1977
Captain and Mrs. Frederic A Wyatt (USNR Ret), Barbara Powers Wyatt, Editor
P.O.W. Publications, 10250 Moorpark St., Toluca Lake, CA 91602
Text is reproduced as found in the original publication (including date and
spelling errors).
RONALD J. WEBB
Major - United States Air Force
Shot Down: June 11, 1967
Released: March 4, 1973
I was born in Trenton, New Jersey on August 29, 1937. As a youngster I
traveled all over the United States. I finished High School in Gary,
Indiana-Class of 1955. My interests include music (I play a violin), all
sports (I was a life guard), traveling, history, and flying-to name a few.
I graduated from Indiana University with a BS in Education and I have a
major in Language Arts (High School English teacher), and a minor in
History. I entered the Air Force in March 1960, being commissioned through
ROTC. I served as a Navigator (KB-50 Tanker) until 1965 when I went on lo
Pilot Training. From there I moved on to F4C training in 1966 and to Da Nang
AB, South Vietnam.
My only daughter, Stephanie Marie, was born December 1964 in El Paso, Texas.
I was  captured on June 11, 1967. For the first three years I was  held at
Camp 4, "The Plantation," in Hanoi.  In June  1970 I was moved to "Little
Vegas" section of the main prison Hoa Lo In December 1970 I was moved to the
section known as "Camp Unity," where I remained (with a short excursion out to
"Skid Row" and back to "Heartbreak") until my release 4 March 1973.
While in Hanoi  I learned a lot about life and about myself I learned a
greater appreciation of our wonderful United States of America I learned a lot
about faith in God, country and family While in I Hanoi,  I met some of the
greatest men I could ever hope to meet Americans of whom their country can he
so proud But they are no different than the millions of fine Americans back
home who never forgot us, never lost faith in us, and who supported us through
their loyalty, patriotism, and support of our great  President
The Vietnam struggle and involvement on the part of the United States  has
been a long, difficult and distasteful one Unfortunately thousands of
outstanding Americans gave their lives - while others are still missing, and
so many  others served their tours over there with proper loyalty, patriotism,
and  honor of American citizenship I deeply regret that our great  nation
suffered so much internal dissension during this conflict, but I do feel we,
as a nation, learned great lessons and achieved much of what we intended.
While in Hanoi I learned a lot about Communism and what a dedicatedly evil
menace it is in our world today.  I understand most profoundly now that this
menace must be fought, controlled, and deteriorated throughout the world
Complacency will not be a safeguard against Communist ideology for it never
rests Maintaining our genuine and true American principles of freedom and
democracy is our strongest combatant-against this very real threat.
Finally, I can't begin to explain how grand it feels to be back - to have
gained a second chance at life. This freedom that we at long last were given
again, was  afforded us through the diligent efforts of so many: from our
faithful families, bracelet wearers, Americans who prayed, wrote letters,
supported the Administration, etc, right on up to our military diplomatic
leaders to Dr. Kissinger, Mr. Rogers, and President Nixon.
It's wonderful to be an American!
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Ronald Webb retired from the United States Air Force as a Colonel. He and
his wife Margie reside in Florida. He has served as an official with the FAA
during the Bush Admistration.