FRAZIER, PAUL REID

Name: Paul Reid Frazier
Rank/Branch: E5/US Army
Unit: 191st Assault Helicopter Co., 214th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation
Brigade
Date of Birth: 11 March 1949
Home City of Record: Milwaukee WI
Date of Loss: 03 September 1968
Country of Loss: South Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 103441N 1063728E
Status (in 1973): Killed/Body Not Recovered
Category: 5
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: UH1C
Refno: 1270
Other Personnel In Incident: none missing

Source: Compiled from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S.
Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families,
published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK in 1998.

REMARKS:

SYNOPSIS:  On September 3, 1968 Sgt. Frazier was a crewman aboard a UH1C
helicopter (tail #66-66613) which crashed and exploded in South Vietnam.
The site was inspected within 8 hours of the crash.  All personnel aboard
are accounted for except for Sgt. Frazier.  The crash site was inspected on
May 7 and 8, 1973 by JCRC and positively identified as being the aircraft
and site associated with Frazier's death.  No remains were recovered.

On June 29, 1973, JCRC concluded that no remains were recoverable, as
remains were destroyed by explosive ordnance, aircraft fire or removal from
site by other means.  JCRC recommended that no further operations be planned
to recover Frazier unless new information became available and that the case
be closed.

Several reports have been received concerning the location of remains which
may relate to Sgt. Frazier, but to date, no positive correlation has been
made, nor have any remains been recovered.

Sgt. Frazier is among the missing because his body was never returned to
U.S. control.  For his family, his fate is clear.  For others who are
missing, the agony continues.  Many missing were known prisoners.  Many were
in radio contact as they were being approached by enemy troops.  Others
disappeared, leaving a provocative trail that precludes the assumption of
death.

As evidence mounts that hundreds of Americans may still be alive in
Southeast Asia, one remembers men like Sgt. Frazier.  Would he do more than
we have to bring our men home?