DOOLEY, JAMES EDWARD
Name: James Edward Dooley
Rank/Branch: Lieutenant (JG)/USN
Unit: Attack Squadron 163, USS ORISKANY (CVA 34)
Date of Birth: 14 November 1942 (Middlebury VT)
Home City of Record: Manchester Center VT
Date of Loss: 22 October 1967
Country of Loss: North Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 205100N 1064000E (XH860893)
Status (in 1973): Missing In Action
Category: 5
Acft/Vehicle/Ground: A4E
Refno: 0872
Other Personnel In Incident: (none missing)
Source: Compiled by Homecoming II Project 01 April 1990 from one or more of
the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence
with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W.
NETWORK 2008.
REMARKS:
SYNOPSIS: When Douglas Aircraft created the A4 Skyhawk the intent was to
provide the Navy and Marine Corps with an inexpensive, lightweight attack
and ground support aircraft. The design emphasized low-speed control and
stability during take-off and landing as well as strength enough for
catapult launch and carrier landings. The plane was so compact that it did
not need folding wings for aboardship storage and handling. In spite of its
diminutive size, the A4 packed a devastating punch and performed well where
speed and maneuverability were essential.
LTJG James E. Dooley was a pilot assigned to Attack Squadron 163 onboard the
USS ORISKANY. On October 22, 1967, Dooley was flying an A4E aircraft in the
second division of Attack Squadron 163. The aircraft was on a strike mission
over North Vietnam. The target was the Haiphong railroad yard.
It is believed that Dooley's aircraft hit anti-aircraft fire as he pulled
off the target. Witnesses observed his aircraft straight and level and
streaming fuel while heading eastward toward open water at approximately
6,000 feet. The aircraft then commenced a gradual descent heading toward the
water and crashed. The aircraft impacted in the water in a nose and wing
down attitude about one mile from land. A thorough search of the area was
conducted by the strike group but there was no evidence of a survivor. There
was no parachute seen, nor any radio transmissions from the target area to
the site of impact. The surrounding land area was densely populated and if
he had ejected he most certainly would have been captured immediately.
James E. Dooley was placed in a status of Missing in Action. After six
years, and following the end of the war, Dooley's status was changed to
Presumed Killed in Action because there was no evidence that he was alive.
Nearly 2500 Americans are missing in Southeast Asia. Unlike the MIAs from
other wars, most of these men can be accounted for. Tragically, thousands of
reports have been received, and continue to be received, that indicate
Americans are still captive in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.
Whether James Dooley survived the crash of his plane or died that day in
October 1967 is not known. What is apparent, however, is that someone knows
what happened to James Dooley. Someone knows what happened to the others who
disappeared. Even though men are alive and held captive, the U.S. has been
unable to secure their freedom. Even though American aircraft litter the
countryside of Vietnam, the U.S. has been unable to investigate these sites.
For those men and their families, the war is not over.
----------------------------------
Nigel Caethorne's BAMBOO CAGE
Page 261
Chapter 21
The Women Who Wait
The long years must have taken a savage toll on the men who still live in a
bamboo cage in Vietnam or Laos. It has also taken a terrible toll on the
wives and families of the missing men who know that their loved ones are
alive, but will probably never return to them......

------------------------------------------ 
STATEMENT: Tracy E. Usry Special
Investigator, Senate Foreign Relations Committee - Minority Staff
Minnesota State Senate Veterans Affairs Committee February 7, 1991
My name is Tracy E. Usry, I am employed as a Special Investigator for the
minority staff, Foreign Relations Committee, U.S. Senate. I am responsible
for the conduct of the legislative inquiry concerning the Prisoner of
War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) issue, initiated by the Honorable Jesse
Helms, Senior Senator from North Carolina as well as the Honorable Charles
Grassley, Senator from Iowa.  This concern originated with Senator Grassley,
then passed to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, when Senator Helms
became concerned over the controversy as well as the possibility of men
being left in Southeast Asia at the conclusion of US involvement there. ...
One very good example to show how the Defense Department excludes
information that is contrary to their analysis is the case of Navy pilot
LCDR James E. Dooley. It illustrates very well my previous comment about
intelligence analysts disregarding new information. Dooley is listed as
Killed in Action/Body not Recovered by the Defense Intelligence Agency,
however, private researchers believe he was taken prisoner in North Vietnam.
Dooley was not returned or accounted for during Operation Homecoming in
1973. Dooley was shot down October 22, 1967 while on a bombing run near
Hanoi, flying an A-4E aircraft. He crashed south of Do Son, Haiphong
province, North Vietnam. Limited observation by fellow pilots, weather and
the swiftness of the incident may have led to some confusion over whether or
not Dooley survived the crash. In 1973, a returning U.S. POW claimed he saw
Dooley's name written on the wall in a prison cell in Hanoi; two Thai
special forces soldiers also released by the North Vietnamese in 1973,
identified Dooley's photograph as that of a person who was in prison with
them; and a propaganda photograph of captured U.S. pilots in Hanoi, dated
after the Dooley casualty, shows a partial profile of a person that strongly
resembles Dooley. In 1987, a North Vietnamese refugee interviewed by U.S.
intelligence personnel, while in a refugee camp, described the shootdown of
an American jet he witnessed in 1968, in the area of Do Son, Haiphon
Province.  He stated that he saw the pilot bail out with a tri-colored
parachute and try to swim out to sea to escape capture.  While swimming out
to sea, the pilot fired at his pursuers, who were in boats chasing him.
Once captured, the pilot was stripped of his one-piece flight suit and
placed in the sidecar of a motorcycle, then taken away by North Vietnamese
officials to a waiting chinese - made automobile.
An early DOD analyst's evaluation of the source's information noted a number
of discrepancies; the analyst believed the source witnessed the shootdown of
Navy pilot J.M. Hickerson, which occurred in the same general area as
Dooley's shootdown, only two months later.
In April 1989, former POW Hickerson made a written statement pointing out he
had landed on the inside of the peninsula at Do Son, did not even enter the
water, let alone have access to the sea to swim away to avoid capture, did
not fire his pistol, utilized a solid white parachute, was wearing the
traditional two piece Marine Utility uniform and was taken to prison riding
on the back of a bicycle.  JCRC maintains its position that the refugee's
information pertained to the Hickerson crash and not Dooley.  The analyst
refused to change his finding in spite of the other evidence to the contrary
presented to him. This is just one of several examples in which the analysis
is flawed.
In line with the resolution of live sighting reports, is the accountability
of missing through the Presumptive finding of death, which was utilized by
the Defense Department to write off all prisoners listed as missing in Laos.
Authority for "Presumptive Finding of Death" is found in title 5 USC,
Section 5565 through 5566, for civilian employees and Title 37, USC, Section
555 through 557 for U.S. military personnel.  These codes permit the
secretaries of agencies to declare an individual dead after the person has
been missing for 12 months under circumstances indicating he or she may have
died.  Once this declaration is made, surviving spouses, next of kin or
children are entitled to government sponsored death benefits, e.g.,
six-months pay for spouses of deceased military members, government life
insurance, etc.  After a declaration is made, the individual is then removed
from the active roles of the military service or agency responsible for
him/her.
The Dooley example cited previously well illustrates this problem of a
finding of death impacting on the individual file and the welfare of next of
kin also. I wish to cite two additional examples as well.  The first, is
again taken from the "Uncorrelated Information Relating to Missing Americans
in Southeast Asia". A Vietnamese source identified the picture of a U.S.
Marine as a person he saw in North Vietnamese custody.  The interrogator
indicated he thought the source was mistaken because the Marine was
officially listed as Killed In Action/Body Not Recovered. ...
-------------------------------------------
STATEMENT - Harvey J. Andrews, PhD
            Consultant, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
            State of Oklahoma House Veterans Affairs                              Committee
            March 26, 1991
My name is Harvey Andrews.  I am employed as a consultant/researcher for the
minority staff, Foreign Relations Committee, United States Senate. I am
responsible for providing assistance and research for the minority staff's
inquiry of the Prisoner of War/Missing In Action (POW/MIA) issue.  The
inquiry was initiated in the Foreign Relations Committee by the Honorable
Jesse Helms, Senior Senator from North Carolina.  During the early stages of
this inquiry, the Honorable Charles Grassley, Senior Senator from Iowa was
the motivating factor for my participation in this issue.  This concern
originated with Senator Grassley's staff, then passed to Senator Helms of
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee when Senator Helms became concerned
over the controversy that there was a possibility that United States
citizens were left behind in Southeast Asia at the conclusion of United
States involvement in the Second Indochina War. ...
To show how the Department of Defense excludes information that is contrary
to their analysis, I'll summarize the case of Navy pilot Lieutenant
Commander (LCDR) James E. Dooley, missing and presumed KIA/BNR.  It is used
to illustrate how intelligence analysts tend to disregard new information.
According to a file provided to this inquiry by interested persons,
then-Lieutenant (jg) Dooley was shot down October 22, 1967 while on a
bombing run near Hanoi while flying an A-4E aircraft.  He crashed south of
Do Son, Haiphong province, North Vietnam.  Limited observation by fellow
pilots, weather and the swiftness of the incident may have led to some
confusion over whether or not Dooley survived the crash.  In 1973, a
returning U.S. POW claimed he saw Dooley's name written on the wall in a
prison cell in Hanoi; two Thai special forces soldiers also released by the
North Vietnamese in 1973, identified Dooley's photograph as that of one of
the persons they saw in prison with them; and a propaganda photograph of
captured U.S. pilots in Hanoi, dated after the Dooley casualty, shows a
partial profile of a person that strongly resembles Dooley.
"In 1987, a North Vietnamese refugee interviewed by U.S. intelligence
personnel, while in a refugee camp in Hong Kong, described the downing of an
American jet he witnessed in 1968, while fishing in the area of Do Son,
Haiphong Province.  The refugee stated that he saw the pilot bail out with a
tri-colored parachute, land in the water on the Tonkin Gulf side of the
peninsula and try to swim out to sea to escape capture. While swimming out
to sea, the pilot fired a pistol at his pursuers, who were in boats chasing
him.  He was finally captured, stripped of his one-piece flight suit, placed
in the sidecar of a motorcycle, and driven across Do San Airfield.  Then the
captured pilot was taken away by North Vietnamese officials to a waiting
Chinese-made automobile.  During this incident, according to the witness,
other American aircraft were flying in the area presumably looking for the
captured pilot.  The witness said the downed jet crashed in the water of the
Tonkin Gulf.
An early DOD analyst's evaluation of the source's information noted a number
of discrepancies; Judged the refugee as incompetent because of his lack of
education and the years since the sighting.  According to the analyst, he
believed the source witnessed the shoot down of Navy pilot J. M. Hickerson,
which occurred in the same general area as Dooley's shootdown, but in
December 1967.  Hickerson survived his crash near Do Son and returned as a
POW in 1973.
In April 1989, after having been informed that the DIA analyst indicated the
refugee in Hong Kong may have witnessed his shootdown and capture in North
Vietnam, former POW Hickerson voluntarily made a written statement regarding
the incident.  Hickerson said, he parachuted near Do Son, landing on the
inside of the peninsula, not the Tonkin Gulf side; could not have swam out
to sea from that location to attempt to avoid capture; did not fire use his
pistol because it was under his flight gear; his parachute was solid white;
wore a two-piece Marine utility uniform rather than a flight suit; and was
taken to prison riding on the back of a bicycle.  He added, that at no time
did he see an airfield, nor was he transported across one after capture.
Additionally, he said the ceiling was less than one thousand feet that day
due to overcast and there were no other U.S. aircraft visible under the low
overcast.  In spite of the new information, the analyst maintains his
position that the refugee's information pertained to the Hickerson crash and
not Dooley's. ...
=================================
[ssrep7.txt 02/09/93]
SMITH 324 COMPELLING CASES ...
North Vietnam            James E. Dooley
                            (0872)
On October 22, 1967, Dooley was the pilot of an A-4E on a combat
mission over Hai Phong.  He was hit by hostile fire while pulling
off from an attack on the Hai Phong railroad yard.  Witnesses
observed the aircraft begin a gradual descent and crash into the
water about a mile offshore.  Search and rescue aircraft could not
locate any sign of a survivor.  He was initially reported missing
in action.  After Operation Homecoming he was declared dead,
remains not recoverable.
Returning U.S. POWs reported either seeing Dooley's name on a wall
or heard he was a prisoner.  Returning U.S. POWs were unable to
report having seen him alive in prison. ...
=====================================
Photocopies or microfilm copies of these articles are available from the
Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service, Washington D.C. 20540.
VOICE: 202-707-5640     FAX 202-707-1771 ...
297 . North Vietnam, pre-1975: Summary Extract/Non-Returnee [concerns seeing
Dooley's name on wall at Plantation Gardens] ...
==========================================
Documents found on CIA popular documents site
www.foia.ucia.gov/
11/30/98
...
LCDR JAMES E DOOLEY USNR-RESULTS OF PHOTO COMPARISON CASE NO (DELETED)-
Pub Date:  January 31, 1971   Pages:  0004 ...

======================================================================

National Alliance of Families

For the Return of America’s Missing Servicemen

World War II – Korea – Cold War – Vietnam – Gulf Wars

 

Dolores Alfond --- 425-881-1499

Lynn O’Shea ------ 718-846-4350

 

Web Site -- www.nationalalliance.org

Email ------ lynn@nationalalliance.org

 

 

January 26, 2008            Bits N Pieces             

 

 

The National Alliance of Families mourns the passing of Erma Hasenbeck, mother of one of the 19 New POWs Pfc Paul A. Hasenbeck.    We met Erma only once but that was enough to tell us she was a very special lady.  To her large and extended family we offer our deepest sympathy.

##############

 

Truth Squads – If you’ve been watching the news and reading newspapers lately you have heard a lot about “truth squads.”   Well, we have our own kind of truth squad.   Anytime a politician, regardless of party, makes a statement regarding the POW/MIA issue that is misleading or untrue, we feel obligated to correct the record.

 

Such is the case with a statement made by Senator John McCain.   According to an article by Todd J. Gillman, published January 19th in the Dallas Morning News, Senator McCain is quoted as stating: “There is a record of the POW-MIA commission which unanimously reported that there is no compelling evidence that there's Americans alive in Southeast Asia .  I'm proud of the work that we did on a bipartisan basis.  The recognition of Vietnam . I'm proud of my record there."

 

The “POW-MIA commission” Senator McCain refers to is well known to our readers as the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs.   Equally well known to our readers is the most important conclusion of that committee.

 

The following comes directly from the committee's report, published January 13, 1993.

 

[Begin Quote] -- "In 1976, the Montgomery Committee concluded that because there was no evidence that missing Americans had survived, they must be dead. In 1977, a Defense Department official said that the distinction between Americans still listed as "POW" and those listed as "missing" had become "academic". Nixon, Ford and Carter Administration officials all dismissed the possibility that American POWs had survived in Southeast Asia after Operation Homecoming."

 

"This Committee has uncovered evidence that precludes it from taking the same view. We acknowledge that there is no proof that U.S. POWs survived, but neither is there proof that all of those who did not return had died. There is evidence, moreover, that indicates the possibility of survival, at least for a small number, after Operation Homecoming:

 

First, there are the Americans known or thought possibly to have been alive in captivity who did not come back; we cannot dismiss the chance that some of these known prisoners remained captive past Operation Homecoming.

 

Second, leaders of the Pathet Lao claimed throughout the war that they were holding American prisoners in Laos . Those claims were believed--and, up to a point, validated--at the time; they cannot be dismissed summarily today.

 

Third, U.S. defense and intelligence officials hoped that forty or forty-one prisoners captured in Laos would be released at Operation Homecoming, instead of the twelve who were actually repatriated. These reports were taken seriously enough at the time to prompt recommendations by some officials for military action aimed at gaining the release of the additional prisoners thought to be held.

 

Fourth, information collected by U.S. intelligence agencies during the last 19 years, in the form of live-sighting, hearsay, and other intelligence reports, raises questions about the possibility that a small number of unidentified U.S. POWs who did not return may have survived in captivity.

 

Finally, even after Operation Homecoming and returnee debriefs, more than 70 Americans were officially listed as POWs based on information gathered prior to the signing of the peace agreement; while the remains of many of these Americans have been repatriated, the fates of some continue unknown to this day."

[End Quote]

 

McCain’s statement that “there is no compelling evidence that there's Americans alive in Southeast Asia” is a far cry from the committee’s conclusion: “…We acknowledge that there is no proof that U.S. POWs survived, but neither is there proof that all of those who did not return had died. There is evidence, moreover, that indicates the possibility of survival, at least for a small number, after Operation Homecoming….” 

 

We should all remember, and remind the media and anyone else who will listen, that John McCain signed the final report of the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs, a report which stated; “There is evidence, moreover, that indicates the possibility of survival, at least for a small number, after Operation Homecoming….” 

 

We’d like to find the reporter that would ask the next question…. Senator McCain, what have you done since 1993 to help learn what happened to that “small number” with evidence that indicated “the possibility of survival?”  We all know the answer to that question…. Nothing!

####################

 

Why We Need H. Res 111 – calling for a Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs in the House of Representatives.    There are many, many reasons but for today, we will offer only one…. James Dooley.

 

####################

 

Is It or Isn’t It -- Our regular readers are well aware of our complaint and the complaint of many POW/MIA family members that reports of unreturned POWs are routinely “re-evaluated” to correlate to a returned POW.

 

One of the most egregious and publicly debated of these “re-evaluations” occurred in the case of Navy LCDR James Dooley, Case 0872.   Dooley was originally report as an over water loss and placed in Category 5 indicating the enemy would have no knowledge as to Dooley’s fate and that his remains were non-recoverable. 

 

In January 1987, a refugee provided a detailed description of the shoot down and capture of a pilot.   According to the source; “he heard an explosion and saw a single person descending under a fully deployed, tri-color parachute (red, white and blue) and land on the beach approximately 50 meters east of the Do Son airfield….  The pilot attempted to evade by swimming out into the water….. No one was wounded or injured during the capture.  The man was escorted to land and was loaded into a sidecar which transported him across the Do Son airfield.   On the west side of the airfield, the man was moved into a Chinese auto which drove away….”

 

The source then provided a physical description of the man stating:  “The pilot appeared to be 24-25 years of age had short, very light brown or blond hair, was approximately 1.8 meters tall, approximately 70 kilograms in weight, was in good physical condition, did not wear eyeglasses, and wore a one piece uniform that had a long zipper in the front and was the color of rice plant leaves.”

 

The biographical site report prepared by the Joint Task Force – Full Accounting (JTF-FA is the predecessor of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command), dated January 27, 1998, James Dooley is described this way:

 

“Race - Caucasian, Sex - male, Hair - Grey - Eyes Blue, Height – 68in/ 1.73 mtre, Weight 150 lb/ 67.99 kg.”   Dooley was one month short of his 25th birthday when shot down.

 

Based on the description of the incident, the pilot, and general time frame the Joint Casualty Resolution Center (JCRC was the predecessor of the Joint Task Force – Full Accounting) the report, designated HK86-102, was correlated to the Dooley loss.

 

If the source was accurate and the JCRC correlation was accurate and there was no reason to doubt either, James Dooley had survived his incident and was captured.  But, the late 1980’s was not a time when the government was looking to add POWs to the list.   Instead, they were looking to remove names using convoluted accounting methods.

 

By July of 1988, “JCRC initiated a complete reevaluation of all incidents which occurred in the area reported by the source….. As a result of this review, we must rescind the correlation…. to Lt. Dooley.  The circumstances of loss described…. more closely relate with Commander Hickerson’s incident.”  [Source – JCRC Message 260812Z  JUL 88]  Hickerson returned during Operation Homecoming in 1973.

 

With a stroke of the pen Jim Dooley was no longer captured and was once again lost at sea.

 

As part of an investigation conducted by the Minority Staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee into the POW/MIA issue, the Dooley case came under scrutiny.  Lead investigator for the Minority Staff Tracy Usry became convinced that the enemy, in fact, captured Dooley.   In addition to the report of capture, a returned POW reported either seeing or hearing of Dooley’s name scratched onto a cell wall.   

 

According the “Summary of All Non-Returnees Reported Vol 3 Navy Personnel Not returned from Southeast Asia” based on the debriefing of returned POWs  “Source [returned POW Lenard  Daugherty]  thought Perricone had mentioned seeing Dooley’s name scratched into wall at camp nicknamed Paradise Garden.  Neither Perricone or source had firsthand information.    Addl Info – Apr 73 – No contact.  Either saw name on wall or was told about name by Richard Perricone”

 

Additionally, the refugee report HK86-102 would not go away.   Dooley’s former fiancé contacted Commander Hickerson to confirm that the report did, in fact, describe his incident of loss. 

 

In a letter dated April 24, 1989, Hickerson stated; “My name is Captain J. M. Hickerson, USN (Ret) – POW 22 December 1967 to 14 March 1973.   I do not believe that the captured American pilot, subject of JCRC Report HK86-102, was me.   There are too many discrepancies between the JCRC Report HK86-102 and my capture….”

 

Hickerson went on to detail various and blatant discrepancies which included the following:

           

            “My parachute was all white, not red, white and blue.”

 

            “If I had landed 50 meters from an airfield, I would have been aware of it.”

 

            “I did not attempt to use my pistol.”

 

“I was transported away on the back of a bicycle, not in a sidecar, and I was never in an automobile.”

 

“I was wearing Marine fatigues (2 piece), not a one piece flight suit.”

 

Hickerson ended his letter stating;   “Despite the fact that the location and date of the described capture was approximately mine considering the above, I do not believe that the captured pilot reported in JCRC Report HK86-102, was me.”

 

The Dooley’s case became a linchpin in the final report issued by the Minority Staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Report., commonly referred to as the “Grassley-Helms Report” or simply the “Helms Report.”  

 

It also became a target for the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs and specifically one of its members, Senator John McCain.

 

Senator McCain was more than aggressive in his challenge of the conclusions reached on the Dooley case by the Minority Staffs lead investigator Tracy Usry.   McCain challenged the presentation of information regarding the Dooley case.   Specifically, the information obtained from returned POW Lenard  Daugherty and the way in which it was presented in the Helms Report. 

 

One of the many confrontational exchanges between Senator McCain and Mr. Usry went this way.

 

Senator McCain:  “That has nothing to do with my questions, Mr. Usry.  That was very illuminating.  It has nothing to do with my question.  My question was: Where did you get the information that a U.S. POW, which you state as fact in your report, said he saw Dooley’s name written on the wall of a prison cell in Hanoi ?

 

Mr. Usry:  That’s in the information that’s provided to the family members and I would be more than happy to research that and provide you and answer for the record, Senator.”

 

Senator McCain:  “In other words you do not know at this moment?”

 

Mr. Usry:  “I don’t know every nuance of this report in my head at this particular time, since it was published in May, no sir.”

 

Usry appeared before the committee again, one week later to provide written answers to the questions supplied by the committee.  In the end, despite a vigorous defense of the Dooley case, by Mr. Usry, the challenge to the case led by Senator McCain firmly put Jim Dooley in the water, lost at sea.

 

Why bring this up now?   The reason is simple.  Based on newly found government reports it looks like Jim Dooley may, once again, be out of the water.

 

JPAC Message Traffic dated 24023Z JUN 05 states in part; “The information contained in this article correlates to unresolved case 0872, based on general timeframe, time of day, location and known circumstances.  The date in the article (22 November 1967), however, is one month different than the actual incident date of 22 October 1967.  The translation also states the unit took part in a battle on 22 October 1967, but did not shoot down a U.S. aircraft.  Although there is no record of a shoot down in this area on 22 November 1967, the author of the articles may have inadvertently transposed the dates.”

“…In addition, in February 1997 the VNOSMP presented a U.S. Team with a photograph annotated with the following:  “Aircraf” wreckage, A4E, piloted by Dooley, James Edward, Rank first Lieutenant, Air force, shot down at Hai Phong 22-10-67, pilot missing.”    The report noted; “The item was found in a military museum.”

 

The message ended saying; “ Despite multiple indicators that the case 0872 aircraft crashed at sea the combination of the above article, which says the aircraft crashed on land, and the photography, which provides evidence of Vietnamese knowledge of the aircraft wreckage and pilot’s name, might warrant further investigation.”

 

A follow-up investigation is described in JPAC message 202010Z NOV 06.   According to the message;

“During the 83rd Joint Field Activity (JFA) (13 October 14 November 2005), a Vietnamese Office for Seeking Missing Persons (VNOSMP) Team conducted advance work for case 0872 pursuant to U.S. requirements.  The VNOSMP team interviewed four witnesses who provided information regarding a number of U.S. aircraft loss incidents in Hai Phong.  Two of the witnesses, Messrs. Dang Duc and Le Van Duc, described the 22 October 1967 shoot down of a U.S. aircraft, possibly correlating to case 0872.   According to Mr. Dang Duc, the pilot of that Aircraft was captured.”

 

In his interview Duc is reported to have stated: “the Enterprise Self-Defense unit along with the militia captured a pilot, who they later turned over to higher authorities.”  Another witness reported his participation “in the capture and turnover of two pilots one from an aircraft that crashed in the ocean in Thuy Trieu village and one from an aircraft that crashed in Lap Le Village.” 

 

Perhaps someone might want to ask Senator McCain about Jim Dooley and the fact that new Vietnamese witnesses are now reporting the capture of a pilot that once again is being correlated to Dooley?   Or, they might want to ask Senator McCain what he will do about bringing Jim Dooley and all our POWs and MIAs home?

##################

 

257 Co-Sponsors for H.Res 111 --That’s right!  Thanks to your efforts H.Res 111 calling for the formation of a Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs in the House of Representatives is so much closer to becoming a reality.

 

We’ve got the votes!   Our next hurtle is getting H.Res 111 out of the Rules committee.  To do this we need to keep the pressure on Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Chairperson of the Rules Committee, Louise McIntosh-Slaughter.    Please send letters to both Speaker Pelosi and Chairperson McIntosh-Slaughter stressing the need for a new look at the POW/MIA issue.    Send your letter to:

 

Honorable Nancy Pelosi                                   Tel: 202-225-0100 or Toll Free at 866-727-4894

Office of the Speaker                                        Fax: 202-225-8259

H-232, US Capitol                                                   202-225-4188

Washington , DC 20515

 

And don’t forget Rules Committee Chairperson

 

Honorable Louise McIntosh-Slaughter

2469 Rayburn Bldg                                          Tel: 202-225-3615 or Toll Free at 866-727-4894

Washington D.C. 20515                                    Fax: 202-225-7822

 

As we work on Speaker Pelosi and Chairperson McIntosh Slaughter, please continue to gather co-sponsors.   For a list of Congressional Representatives visit www.nationalalliance.org/legis/index.htm   Check to see if your representative is a co-sponsor of H.Res 111.   If he or she is not highlighted in red, contact them and ask that they co-sponsor H. Res 111.

######################

 

New Book To Be Released      “Perfidy” -  The Government Cabal That Knowingly Abandoned Our POW’s  And Left Them To Die  by John (Top) Holland is about to be released.   Place your order now!   To Pre-order contact The American Free Press at 202-544-5977 or truthhound2@yahoo.com

 

We haven’t seen the book but based on Top’s many years of experience in the POW/MIA issue, we are sure this will be a great read.

####################

 

South Korea Has a Bold Idea – the President elect of South Korea has elevated the POW issue in his country to  a high national priority.   Don’t laugh!   Unlike his U.S. counterparts over the years, it looks like president-elect Lee Myung-bak means it.

 

An article published in Chosunilbo states:  “As it was being briefed a few days ago by the Defense Ministry, president-elect Lee Myung-bak's Transition Committee said it views resolving the plight of South Korean prisoners of war held in North Korea as a prime responsibility of the state, and the situation demands priority. As a result, the Defense Ministry has decided to consistently raise this issue in military talks with North Korea and to take steps to verify the existence of South Korean POWs in North Korea and seek their return.”

 

“Since 1990, 59 South Korean POWs have fled North Korea and returned to the South. And based on their accounts, around 560 more are still believed to be held. Yet North Korea is refusing to even acknowledge the existence of South Korean POWs there. Their attitude will not change overnight.”

 

“But still, that South Korea has announced that it is its prime responsibility to bring back the POWs is of tremendous significance.  That's because it is a pledge by the government to carry out its basic responsibilities to its people. A country that is incapable of protecting and saving its own people is not worthy of existence. And a country like that has nothing to say to its people who were imprisoned while fighting for their homeland.”

 

A follow-up article stated South Korea was considering sending aid to North Korea for the return of their POWs.  According to the article “The Unification Ministry is considering a West Germany-style offer of economic aid to North Korea in return for the release of South Korean prisoners of war. Before unification, West Germany cajoled East Germany to hand over political prisoners for economic aid.”

 

Seoul believes that there are some 560 South Korean POWs and 480 abduction victims in the North.  An official said his ministry reported to the presidential transition committee four or five ways of offering economic aid to the North to ensure the safety of South Korean POWs and abductees, promote meetings with their relatives in the South, and ultimately achieve their return.”

 

 “The West German government gave some W1.7  trillion (US$1=W937) to East Germany and brought 34,000 political prisoners to the West between 1963 and 1989. Bonn first gave cash but later provided coffee, oil and copper.”

 

“A ministry official said in addition to the West German way, Japanese and U.S.-style solutions were being suggested to the transition team. Japan exercised political pressure and offered rice to the North to bring back some of the Japanese kidnapped by the communist country in the 1960s and 1970s. The U.S. traded the remains of its soldiers in North Korea killed during the Korean War for cash.  North Korea officially denies there are South Korean POW there, using the ambiguous expression “people whose fate became unknown during or after the war" instead of POWs or abduction victims.

 

The only difference between the U.S. approach and the approach under consideration by the South Koreans is that the South Koreans are going after LIVE POWs.

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Officials search for POW/MIAs on Wake Island – in an article by Tech. Sgt. Chris Vadnais, Air Force News Agency reports:  “A team of anthropologists sent by Joint Prisoner of War Missing in Action Accounting Command officials began to dig on Wake Island to determine if they have found World War II prisoners of war.”

 

“When a contractor doing asbestos abatement work on the island discovered what appeared to be human remains, Wake Island officials contacted JPAC.”

 

“Wake Island was the site of a fierce World War II battle, coinciding with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor . American forces surrendered the island on Dec. 23, 1941, and the Japanese held it until September 1945, when a Marine detachment regained control for America .”

 

“The remains may be those of 98 American civilian contractors, who were held as prisoners of war to perform forced labor for the Japanese and then executed in 1943.”

 

"We're looking to see if we have found little bits of human bone or even possibly artifacts that might be related to the incident," he said. "So I'm looking for anything from shells to rounds to buttons, any sort of personal effects, coins, and they really stand out against the background of shell debris."

 

“The job is tantamount to looking for a needle in a haystack, only you're not sure there is a needle in the haystack. It's a tedious process that takes time -- and on this overnight trip, time is the one thing this team doesn't have much of.

 

"We've got five hours of daylight today and maybe three tomorrow," Mr. Berg said. "We're moving at max speed to get this done. We sent out two anthropologists to tackle this because we knew we had such a short period of time."

 

“And after hours of digging and sifting, the team's efforts paid off. After excavating only a one meter square section of earth, they've bagged-and-tagged the lower quarter of the skeleton. They suspect there is more to be found in the area.  They'll fly the remains back to Hickam AFB, where scientists will analyze the remains.”

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Why does Johnie Webb still have his job???