ANDERSON, GARETH LAVERNE

Name: Gareth Laverne Anderson
Rank/Branch: O2/United States Navy
Unit: VF 114
Date of Birth:
Home City of Record: Falmouth MA
Date of Loss: 19 May 1967
Country of Loss: North Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 204800 North  1054400 East
Status (in 1973): Returnee
Category:
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: F4B

Other Personnel in Incident: Charles Plumb, returnee

Source: Compiled by P.O.W. NETWORK  from one or more of the following: raw
data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA
families, published sources, interviews.

REMARKS: 730304 RELEASED BY DRV

SYNOPSIS:

Plumb and Anderson werew shot down the following on the birthday of Ho Chi
Minh, May 19, 1967, just south of Hanoi. Joseph Plumb was the pilot, the
radar intercept officer was Gary Anderson. Both were captured immediately.

Plumb recalls the incident: The F4B Phatom lay crumpled in a smouldering
wreckage near the small village. The peasants stripped me of all my flight
gear, blindfolded me, and put me into a pen with a buffalo bull where I got
the opportunity for the first, and hopefully the last time in my life, to
play matador. But having no red cape, I was unable to attract a great deal
of attention from the fairly docile bull. So it was necessary for the
Vietnamese to run around to the aft side of this animal and harass him into
making sweeps upon my innocent body with his horns. I received no permanent
injury. And I look back upon it with more humor than terror.



SOURCE: WE CAME HOME  copyright 1977
Captain and Mrs. Frederic A Wyatt (USNR Ret), Barbara Powers Wyatt, Editor
P.O.W. Publications, 10250 Moorpark St., Toluca Lake, CA 91602
Text is reproduced as found in the original publication (including date and
spelling errors).
UPDATE - 09/95 by the P.O.W. NETWORK, Skidmore, MO

GARETH L. "GARY" ANDERSON
Lieutenant Commander - United States Navy
Shot Down: May 19, 1967
Released: March 4, 1973
         
I have been asked many times in many states why we as POW's are expressing
patriotism, faith in God and country . Were we not coached in our comments
to the public in this regard?
         
No, of course not. We were, however, imbued with a greater appreciation of
our country  and its people. Unfortunately it had to take deprivation and
hardship, to grasp, to accept the fact that we took so many things in our
country, if not our country itself, for granted. Our expressed patriotism
was reflected in our reliance, our admiration in one another rather than
suspicion.
         
A friend reflects far better what I wish to convey:
         
"To those who honor me by public conduct, speaking well of me, cherishing my
coveted sacredness and heritage and above all, pride in me, I award the most
valuable award, which requires allegiance, fidelity, courtesy, compassion,
humanity and more than that, a deep feeling inside of love for my
presence--a red and white standard, with a blue square, filled with
crystal-clear white stars, representing the country which adopted me as its
guardian and protector. For you see, I am the American Flag. My award--the
American Flag Award, is not for the timid."
         
So, it is with honor and pride that we return to our country. The great
nation we have is only because of its people, their values, and their
patriotism.


Gary Anderson died during a military training flight in 1974.

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