REMAINS RETURNED 01/95  IDENTIFIED 10/95

APPLEBY, IVAN DALE

Name: Ivan Dale Appleby
Rank/Branch: O4/US Air Force
Unit: 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Ubon AF TH
Date of Birth: 13 September 1930
Home City of Record: Fresno CA (Family in AZ, CO)
Date of Loss: 07 October 1967
Country of Loss: North Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 204000N 1050800E (WH156796)
Status (in 1973): Missing In Action
Category: 2
Acft/Vehicle/Ground: F4D

Other Personnel In Incident: William R. Austin (Returned POW)

Source: Compiled by Homecoming II Project 31 April 1990 from one or more of
the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence
with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W.
NETWORK.

REMARKS:

SYNOPSIS: Major Ivan D. Appleby was the pilot of an F4D aircraft flying a
photo reconnaissance escort mission over North Vietnam in October 1967. His
backseater was Capt. William R. Austin II. Austin and Appleby were onboard the
lead aircraft in a flight of F4D Phantom fighter jets.

When the flight was over Hoi Binh Province about 25 miles southwest of the
city of Hoi Binh, it encountered intense hostile fire which inflicted heavy
damage to the lead aircraft. The aircraft began burning and went out of
control. One parachute was observed prior to the aircraft crashing into a
hill.

The U.S. later learned that Austin had been captured, but Appleby's fate
remained uncertain. He was listed Missing in Action.

When American prisoners were released in 1973, Austin was among them, but
Appleby was not. In late 1976, based on no information to indicate he was
alive, Appleby was presumptively declared dead.

Nearly 2500 Americans did not come home from the war in Vietnam. Unlike "MIAs"
from previous wars, most of these men and women can be accounted for. Some
hundred were known to be held as prisoners, and some were photographed in
captivity. Others were alive and well the last time they were heard from,
describing an advancing enemy.

Years after our military involvement ended, reports of Americans held captive
continue to mount. Thousands of reports have been received related to
Americans missing in Southeast Asia, and many government officials now believe
that hundreds are still being held prisoner. The U.S. Government continues to
press the Vietnamese for information, as it has for nearly 20 years. The U.S.
views the problem as humanitarian, while the Vietnamese are concerned with
reconstruction aid promised by the United States in signed agreements, but not
delivered. Until we are willing to negotiate for their release, these
Americans will die in communist prisons wondering why their country abandoned
them.

Ivan D. Appleby was promoted to the rank of Colonel during the period he was
maintained missing.

* DIA Homecoming (Egress Recap), April 24, 1973 quotes returnee William Austin
saying "After being hit by SAM, lost hydraulics, aircraft started to roll,
unable to control with rudder or ailerons. Aircraft CO ordered bailout. After
I bailed out, I did not see a chute or hear from Maj. Appleby again. I did
observe what I believe to be the aircraft impact approx 3-5 miles from where I
landed."